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Archive for Marzec, 2018

Symfony Blog: Introducing the Symfony 4 certification

Symfony Blog: Introducing the Symfony 4 certification

On the Symfony blog, there’s a new post that introduces a new certification targeted towards the latest release of the framework: the Symfony 4 certification.

Symfony 4 was released in November 2017, alongside new best practices and Symfony Flex, the new way to manage Symfony applications. This new version is so different from Symfony 3 that we’ve decided to introduce a new Symfony 4 certification program.

The Symfony 4 exam consists of 75 questions to be answered in 90 minutes or less and you can take the exam in any of the 4,000 test centers available worldwide. The list of topics covers the most important parts of the core framework, excluding third-party libraries like Doctrine, Monolog, etc. Depending on your results, you’ll get the Advanced Certified badge or the more difficult Expert Certified badge.

They already have the vouchers on sale for the certification so you can take it and add that certification badge to your list. You can find out more about this and other Symfony certifications on the Symfony project certification site.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/26103

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Symfony Blog: Introducing the Symfony 4 certification

Symfony Blog: Introducing the Symfony 4 certification

On the Symfony blog, there’s a new post that introduces a new certification targeted towards the latest release of the framework: the Symfony 4 certification.

Symfony 4 was released in November 2017, alongside new best practices and Symfony Flex, the new way to manage Symfony applications. This new version is so different from Symfony 3 that we’ve decided to introduce a new Symfony 4 certification program.

The Symfony 4 exam consists of 75 questions to be answered in 90 minutes or less and you can take the exam in any of the 4,000 test centers available worldwide. The list of topics covers the most important parts of the core framework, excluding third-party libraries like Doctrine, Monolog, etc. Depending on your results, you’ll get the Advanced Certified badge or the more difficult Expert Certified badge.

They already have the vouchers on sale for the certification so you can take it and add that certification badge to your list. You can find out more about this and other Symfony certifications on the Symfony project certification site.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/26103

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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PHP.net: PHP 7.1.16 & 5.6.35 Released

PHP.net: PHP 7.1.16 & 5.6.35 Released

On the main PHP.net site, they’ve posted announcements about the release of minor versions of PHP 7.1.x and 5.6.x: 7.1.16 and 5.6.35.

The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 5.6.35 [and PHP 7.1.16]. This is a security release. One security bug was fixed in this release. All PHP 5.6 [and 7.1] users are encouraged to upgrade to this version.

The bugfixes included in these releases deal with changes in the FPM handling, ODBC functionality, and Phar building. You can download this latest release from the main downloads page (source) or from the windows.php.net site for the Windows binaries.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/26102

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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PHP.net: PHP 7.1.16 & 5.6.35 Released

PHP.net: PHP 7.1.16 & 5.6.35 Released

On the main PHP.net site, they’ve posted announcements about the release of minor versions of PHP 7.1.x and 5.6.x: 7.1.16 and 5.6.35.

The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 5.6.35 [and PHP 7.1.16]. This is a security release. One security bug was fixed in this release. All PHP 5.6 [and 7.1] users are encouraged to upgrade to this version.

The bugfixes included in these releases deal with changes in the FPM handling, ODBC functionality, and Phar building. You can download this latest release from the main downloads page (source) or from the windows.php.net site for the Windows binaries.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/26102

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (03.30.2018)

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (03.30.2018)

Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/26104

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Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (03.30.2018)

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (03.30.2018)

Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/26104

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (03.30.2018)

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (03.30.2018)

Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/26104

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Matthias Noback: Modelling quantities – an exercise in designing value objects

Matthias Noback: Modelling quantities – an exercise in designing value objects

Matthias Noback has a new post on his site with his thoughts about the design of value objects. He makes use of an example he recently saw in the code he was working with: the idea of "quantities" of items.

I recently came across two interesting methods that were part of a bigger class that I had to redesign. [...] What happens [in the methods] is: we have an order line, which keeps track how much of a certain product has been “ordered”, and then how much of it has been “delivered” so far. It also keeps track of how much is currently still “open”. Changes to these “delivered” and “open” quantities happens when we “process” a delivery, or “undo” a delivery.

I was reminded of a recent blog post by Nicolò Pignatelli where he quoted a question from another programming website. Adopted to the situation at hand: "Which variable type would you use for representing a quantity? Integer, Float or String" It’s a trick question, because all the answers are wrong. Nicolò advises not to use a primitive type value, but to design a value object that can represent a quantity.

He then walks through the process for refactoring this quantity handling out into a value object replacing the current float handling. He recommends applying more thought to how the object will be used and how the different types (open, ordered and delivered) relate to each other. He also includes examples of how to replace the add/subtract operations in the original code while still using value objects as immutable constructs.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/26100

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Matthias Noback: Modelling quantities – an exercise in designing value objects

Matthias Noback: Modelling quantities – an exercise in designing value objects

Matthias Noback has a new post on his site with his thoughts about the design of value objects. He makes use of an example he recently saw in the code he was working with: the idea of "quantities" of items.

I recently came across two interesting methods that were part of a bigger class that I had to redesign. [...] What happens [in the methods] is: we have an order line, which keeps track how much of a certain product has been “ordered”, and then how much of it has been “delivered” so far. It also keeps track of how much is currently still “open”. Changes to these “delivered” and “open” quantities happens when we “process” a delivery, or “undo” a delivery.

I was reminded of a recent blog post by Nicolò Pignatelli where he quoted a question from another programming website. Adopted to the situation at hand: "Which variable type would you use for representing a quantity? Integer, Float or String" It’s a trick question, because all the answers are wrong. Nicolò advises not to use a primitive type value, but to design a value object that can represent a quantity.

He then walks through the process for refactoring this quantity handling out into a value object replacing the current float handling. He recommends applying more thought to how the object will be used and how the different types (open, ordered and delivered) relate to each other. He also includes examples of how to replace the add/subtract operations in the original code while still using value objects as immutable constructs.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/26100

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Pehapkari.cz: Domain-Driven Design, part 8 – Services and Factories

Pehapkari.cz: Domain-Driven Design, part 8 – Services and Factories

The Pehapkari.cz blog has posted the latest article in their "Domain-Driven Design" series of posts covering the focus on the "domain" when developing an application rather than just features. In this latest tutorial, they cover services and factories to help with the encapsulation of functionality…and why they shouldn’t be used.

This article is a reaction to readers’ confusion about services. We’ll cover a domain service and domain factory in this article and when to use them and when not to.

Domain-driven design is about the domain. Domain services and domain factories do not exist in the domain. In general, we shouldn’t use them. They are artificial constructions and this causes a lot of problems with code understanding, maintainability and also a divergence between the domain, the model, and the code.

The article continues the use of the e-commerce example when talking about the ideas of services and factories in the domain. It provides some basic examples (flow diagrams included) and the reasoning why they should not be used and what they could be replaced with.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/26099

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