Jeśli jesteś właścicielem tej strony, możesz wyłączyć reklamę poniżej zmieniając pakiet na PRO lub VIP w panelu naszego hostingu już od 4zł!
Strony WWWSerwery VPSDomenyHostingDarmowy Hosting CBA.pl

Archive for Styczeń, 2018

ZFort.com: The Mexican Standoff of PHP Frameworks

ZFort.com: The Mexican Standoff of PHP Frameworks

On the ZFort.com blog there’s a new post that talks about the "Mexican standoff" between PHP frameworks, covering some of the background behind some of the more popular ones and some of the main differences between them.

PHP is one of the most widely known and potent programming languages used today. However, despite the popularity of PHP, there are many businesses using PHP without making use of a quality PHP framework. This approach slows production time and increases costs. A PHP framework is advantageous because it provides you with modules and codebase to help structure and accelerate the web development process.

[...] For CEOs, CTOs, product owners and those in the tech industry, choosing the right PHP framework can help cut production time and costs. However, every PHP framework is unique. [...] Given the wealth of PHP frameworks available, it is important to conduct solid research in order to find the platform that’s right for you. [We'll] take a look at three of the most popular PHP frameworks (Symfony, Laravel and Yii) and break down which is the best, and why.

The article then goes on to cover three of the more widely used frameworks:

  • Symfony
  • Laravel
  • Yii Framework

For each the author covers some of the origins of the framework and some of the things that it’s best at. Following these there’s a section that briefly compares them and how approachable they are for developers new to frameworks. While they all have their strengths the author recommends Symfony as the framework with "the most long term potential" over the others.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25922

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Andreas Möller: Makefile for lazy developers

Andreas Möller: Makefile for lazy developers

In a post to his site Andreas Möller shares a tool that he uses to get an application up and running quickly, providing a makefile for lazy developers.

Whatever the size of the software project, I believe in, subscribe to, and promote Continuous Integration. Personally, I rely on Travis CI as an automated build system. Regardless of whether an automated build system can be set up and used for a project or not, I prefer to be able to run build steps locally. This prevents stress testing the automated build system and taking away resources from other developers. Also, it gives me more confidence before committing and pushing changes upstream.

[...] For a couple of years now I have been using make, after having been introduced to it when working on a project in 2014. While it has its limitations, it’s short and simple, and most of all, it get’s the job done.

He then talks about the repository he’s created to get up and running quickly that creates a simple Makefile to define several make commands and shortcuts for some common tasks. The make it task is the most used, executing all of the other tasks to ensure that all tests pass, the code is well-structured and generates a coverage report to ensure as much of the code is covered by tests as it should be.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25921

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Andreas Möller: Makefile for lazy developers

Andreas Möller: Makefile for lazy developers

In a post to his site Andreas Möller shares a tool that he uses to get an application up and running quickly, providing a makefile for lazy developers.

Whatever the size of the software project, I believe in, subscribe to, and promote Continuous Integration. Personally, I rely on Travis CI as an automated build system. Regardless of whether an automated build system can be set up and used for a project or not, I prefer to be able to run build steps locally. This prevents stress testing the automated build system and taking away resources from other developers. Also, it gives me more confidence before committing and pushing changes upstream.

[...] For a couple of years now I have been using make, after having been introduced to it when working on a project in 2014. While it has its limitations, it’s short and simple, and most of all, it get’s the job done.

He then talks about the repository he’s created to get up and running quickly that creates a simple Makefile to define several make commands and shortcuts for some common tasks. The make it task is the most used, executing all of the other tasks to ensure that all tests pass, the code is well-structured and generates a coverage report to ensure as much of the code is covered by tests as it should be.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25921

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

CloudWays Blog: Clash Between Top Laravel CMS: OctoberCMS VS AsgardCMS

CloudWays Blog: Clash Between Top Laravel CMS: OctoberCMS VS AsgardCMS

On the Cloudways blog there’s a new post from author Saquib Rizwan that compares two of the most popular Laravel-based content management systems: OctoberCMS VS AsgardCMS.

Web developers and development agencies around the world love rapid application development. To keep up with the fast pace of development and fulfill client requirements within the deadline, developers often use a CMS. Popular CMS options available today include WordPress, Drupal, Joomla, and Magento. There are times when these established players are not up to the task. In such scenarios, developers often need a flexible and customizable CMS that are often created using the Laravel framework.

In this article, I will compare OctoberCMS and AsgardCMS, the top two Laravel powered CMS.

The article starts with a brief overview of each, describing some background and how their architected. It then lists some of the requirements for each, installation methods, GitHub "profile" and the basic features offered. It then gets into the comparison, sharing some of the pros and cons for each CMS. There’s no "winner" in the article as it’s just designed to compare.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25920

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

That Podcast: Episode 44: The One Where We Manage Products

That Podcast: Episode 44: The One Where We Manage Products

That Podcast, hosted by PHP community members Beau Simensen and Dave Marshall, has posted it’s latest episode – Episode #44: The One Where We Manage Products. They’re joined by special guest Christophe Dujarric.

Christophe Dujarric shares his experience with Product Management

Other topics mentioned include a tweet about Bitcoin refunds, sketch collaboration tools,
Laravel Shift and the article "Product Design is not Product Management". You can listen to this latest episode either using the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 directly. Be sure to subscribe to their feed and follow them on Twitter to get updates when the latest shows are released.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25918

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

That Podcast: Episode 44: The One Where We Manage Products

That Podcast: Episode 44: The One Where We Manage Products

That Podcast, hosted by PHP community members Beau Simensen and Dave Marshall, has posted it’s latest episode – Episode #44: The One Where We Manage Products. They’re joined by special guest Christophe Dujarric.

Christophe Dujarric shares his experience with Product Management

Other topics mentioned include a tweet about Bitcoin refunds, sketch collaboration tools,
Laravel Shift and the article "Product Design is not Product Management". You can listen to this latest episode either using the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 directly. Be sure to subscribe to their feed and follow them on Twitter to get updates when the latest shows are released.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25918

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (01.26.2018)

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (01.26.2018)

Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25919

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (01.26.2018)

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (01.26.2018)

Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25919

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Sergey Zhuk: Does Factory Method Violate Open/Closed Principle

Sergey Zhuk: Does Factory Method Violate Open/Closed Principle

Sergey Zhuk has written up a post to his site that wonders if the factory method violates the open/closed principle, a part of the SOLID set of principles for software development.

Consider an application that provides some statistics reports. Reports are present in different formats: JSON for API, HTML for viewing in a browser and pdf for printing on the paper. It has StatisticsController that receives a required format from the request and returns a formatted report. The logic for choosing a formatting strategy is hidden behind the factory.

He works through a code example of using the factory pattern to create this functionality, generating the fomatter from behind the factory. He then talks about adding a new formatter for CSVs and the update to the factory that would come with it. It’s this last change he’s wondering about as the Open/Closed principle states that objects should be open for extension but not modification. While the answer is technically "yes" he explains that the purpose of the factory is to abstract the logic away so you only have to deal with one type of thing rather than making it yourself every time.

According to Open-Closed Principle the “correct” solution would be to create a new factory with the same interface. That said, adherence to this principle should always be weighed against other design principles like KISS and YAGNI.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25917

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Sergey Zhuk: Does Factory Method Violate Open/Closed Principle

Sergey Zhuk: Does Factory Method Violate Open/Closed Principle

Sergey Zhuk has written up a post to his site that wonders if the factory method violates the open/closed principle, a part of the SOLID set of principles for software development.

Consider an application that provides some statistics reports. Reports are present in different formats: JSON for API, HTML for viewing in a browser and pdf for printing on the paper. It has StatisticsController that receives a required format from the request and returns a formatted report. The logic for choosing a formatting strategy is hidden behind the factory.

He works through a code example of using the factory pattern to create this functionality, generating the fomatter from behind the factory. He then talks about adding a new formatter for CSVs and the update to the factory that would come with it. It’s this last change he’s wondering about as the Open/Closed principle states that objects should be open for extension but not modification. While the answer is technically "yes" he explains that the purpose of the factory is to abstract the logic away so you only have to deal with one type of thing rather than making it yourself every time.

According to Open-Closed Principle the “correct” solution would be to create a new factory with the same interface. That said, adherence to this principle should always be weighed against other design principles like KISS and YAGNI.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25917

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>