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Archive for Czerwiec, 2017

Three Devs & A Maybe: Servers, Upgrades and a little Cryptocurrency

Three Devs & A Maybe: Servers, Upgrades and a little Cryptocurrency

The Three Devs and a Maybe podcast, hosted by Michael Budd, Fraser Hart, Lewis Cains and Edd Mann, has posted their latest episode: "Servers, Upgrades and a little Cryptocurrency"

In this weeks episode we start off by discussing Edd’s recent Server build, touching upon the hardware specifications, OS/ZFS-pool choices and monitoring configuration. We then move on to highlight the value in splitting up computational intensive tasks into queued jobs, defensive programming in JavaScript and handling querying ever increasing data-sets. Finally, we talk about keeping on-top of Software/Dependency upgrades, moving over to platforms such as AWS and Ethereum.

You can listen to this latest show either using the in-page audio player or by downloading the show directly as an mp3. If you enjoy it, be sure to subscribe to their feed and follow them on Twitter for updates when new shows are released.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25309

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Three Devs & A Maybe: Servers, Upgrades and a little Cryptocurrency

Three Devs & A Maybe: Servers, Upgrades and a little Cryptocurrency

The Three Devs and a Maybe podcast, hosted by Michael Budd, Fraser Hart, Lewis Cains and Edd Mann, has posted their latest episode: "Servers, Upgrades and a little Cryptocurrency"

In this weeks episode we start off by discussing Edd’s recent Server build, touching upon the hardware specifications, OS/ZFS-pool choices and monitoring configuration. We then move on to highlight the value in splitting up computational intensive tasks into queued jobs, defensive programming in JavaScript and handling querying ever increasing data-sets. Finally, we talk about keeping on-top of Software/Dependency upgrades, moving over to platforms such as AWS and Ethereum.

You can listen to this latest show either using the in-page audio player or by downloading the show directly as an mp3. If you enjoy it, be sure to subscribe to their feed and follow them on Twitter for updates when new shows are released.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25309

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Frederick Vanbrabant: The Broken Windows Theory or "Why Some Projects are Just Destined to Suck"

Frederick Vanbrabant: The Broken Windows Theory or "Why Some Projects are Just Destined to Suck"

Frederick Vanbrabant has posted an interesting article to his site covering the "broken windows" theory, what it is and how it shows that some projects are just destined to suck.

Why is it that most legacy software projects are not really fun to work on? How can we stop that greenfield project to turn into one of those dull big projects? I would argue that it’s all in the foundation.

He starts with a brief description of the "broken windows" theory based on the 1982 definition proposed by James Q. Wilson and George L. Kellin. Basically it states that all it takes is one "broken window" to change the perceived value of something, even if it’s a small thing. He then gets down to the code level and relates it back to some examples from the Slim framework project. In his examples he shows how it might look after a refactor and how removing best practices makes it harder to understand (breaking windows). To help prevent it, he recommends following the Boy Scout rule of leaving the code better than you found it and using automation to help find and fix the issues.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25308

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Frederick Vanbrabant: The Broken Windows Theory or "Why Some Projects are Just Destined to Suck"

Frederick Vanbrabant: The Broken Windows Theory or "Why Some Projects are Just Destined to Suck"

Frederick Vanbrabant has posted an interesting article to his site covering the "broken windows" theory, what it is and how it shows that some projects are just destined to suck.

Why is it that most legacy software projects are not really fun to work on? How can we stop that greenfield project to turn into one of those dull big projects? I would argue that it’s all in the foundation.

He starts with a brief description of the "broken windows" theory based on the 1982 definition proposed by James Q. Wilson and George L. Kellin. Basically it states that all it takes is one "broken window" to change the perceived value of something, even if it’s a small thing. He then gets down to the code level and relates it back to some examples from the Slim framework project. In his examples he shows how it might look after a refactor and how removing best practices makes it harder to understand (breaking windows). To help prevent it, he recommends following the Boy Scout rule of leaving the code better than you found it and using automation to help find and fix the issues.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25308

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Community News: Latest PECL Releases (06.20.2017)

Community News: Latest PECL Releases (06.20.2017)

Latest PECL Releases:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25307

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Community News: Latest PECL Releases (06.20.2017)

Community News: Latest PECL Releases (06.20.2017)

Latest PECL Releases:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25307

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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SitePoint PHP Blog: Being a Full Stack Developer (Update)

SitePoint PHP Blog: Being a Full Stack Developer (Update)

The SitePoint PHP blog has made an update to their "Being a Full Stack Developer" article covering what it means to be "full stack" and various technologies that can be used (or skills to learn) to get there.

A full stack developer who can get from a prototype to full MVP (minimum viable product) is often considered a jack of all trades, master of none, and with good reason. To define the modern full stack developer, we first need to focus on what the full stack developer used to be.

The article talks about what it use to mean (back around the early 2000s) to be "full stack" and some of the things they needed to know. He then goes through the things you’ll need to know now to be considered basically on the same level:

  • [Basic] Server Admin / Devops
  • Cloud [Services]
  • Back End [Development]
  • Front End [Development]
  • Design
  • Logging
  • Mobile

He ends the post by answering the question "is it worth it" to be a full stack developer versus focused on one thing, basically boiling down to two things. First, that most devs aren’t actually full stack (even if they say they are) and that it can help to have this experience to, at the least, be able to approach a wide range of projects easier.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25306

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

SitePoint PHP Blog: Being a Full Stack Developer (Update)

SitePoint PHP Blog: Being a Full Stack Developer (Update)

The SitePoint PHP blog has made an update to their "Being a Full Stack Developer" article covering what it means to be "full stack" and various technologies that can be used (or skills to learn) to get there.

A full stack developer who can get from a prototype to full MVP (minimum viable product) is often considered a jack of all trades, master of none, and with good reason. To define the modern full stack developer, we first need to focus on what the full stack developer used to be.

The article talks about what it use to mean (back around the early 2000s) to be "full stack" and some of the things they needed to know. He then goes through the things you’ll need to know now to be considered basically on the same level:

  • [Basic] Server Admin / Devops
  • Cloud [Services]
  • Back End [Development]
  • Front End [Development]
  • Design
  • Logging
  • Mobile

He ends the post by answering the question "is it worth it" to be a full stack developer versus focused on one thing, basically boiling down to two things. First, that most devs aren’t actually full stack (even if they say they are) and that it can help to have this experience to, at the least, be able to approach a wide range of projects easier.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25306

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

SitePoint PHP Blog: Being a Full Stack Developer (Update)

SitePoint PHP Blog: Being a Full Stack Developer (Update)

The SitePoint PHP blog has made an update to their "Being a Full Stack Developer" article covering what it means to be "full stack" and various technologies that can be used (or skills to learn) to get there.

A full stack developer who can get from a prototype to full MVP (minimum viable product) is often considered a jack of all trades, master of none, and with good reason. To define the modern full stack developer, we first need to focus on what the full stack developer used to be.

The article talks about what it use to mean (back around the early 2000s) to be "full stack" and some of the things they needed to know. He then goes through the things you’ll need to know now to be considered basically on the same level:

  • [Basic] Server Admin / Devops
  • Cloud [Services]
  • Back End [Development]
  • Front End [Development]
  • Design
  • Logging
  • Mobile

He ends the post by answering the question "is it worth it" to be a full stack developer versus focused on one thing, basically boiling down to two things. First, that most devs aren’t actually full stack (even if they say they are) and that it can help to have this experience to, at the least, be able to approach a wide range of projects easier.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25306

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Madisoft Labs: Doctrine sharding

Madisoft Labs: Doctrine sharding

On the Madisoft Labs site they’ve posted a tutorial looking at how to split out your application’s data into shards, showing how to do it using Doctrine in a Symfony application.

In the previous article we explored why sharding by tenant is a very good solution for us. In this article we dig into how to divide our Symfony app by shard. [...] We chose Doctrine as our ORM so let’s see what it offers to us.

First of all you have to note that Doctrine is composed mainly by two different parts: DBAL and ORM. ORM leverages DBAL functionalities and it’s completely transparent for sharding. DBAL is the layer we’re interested in.

The author then walks you through the configuration required to make the sharding work including default and a global connections. Next they show the creation of a ShardChoser class that reads a configuration option provided and pulls in the configuration that matches (from YAML files). Finally the ShardManager class is created to handle the connection pool that also includes a "query all" method allowing for the execution of the same SQL on all shards.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25305

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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