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Archive for Czerwiec, 2017

Symfony Finland: Porting a Symfony 3 application to Flex

Symfony Finland: Porting a Symfony 3 application to Flex

On the Symfony Finland site they’ve posted a retrospective about moving an application from Symfony 3 to Flex including the work that was done in the switch and the performance of the result.

Earlier this year I did some experimenting with a Hybrid state object between Symfony Twig templates and front end JavaScript frameworks. Since that time I did that experiment, the Symfony Flex project has progressed. I thought I would try how to port the state prototype to Symfony Flex.

[...] In my case the application was rather simple and all built in the AppBundle, which is best-practise in Symfony3 for many applications. I mostly had to move files and configurations around and change namespaces.

He starts by spending some time talking about the difference between a Symfony 3 environment and the environment Flex provides. He then goes through the eight or so steps to move from one to the other including file/directory changes and configuration updates. Next comes the look at performance differences between the two. Unsurprisingly Flex came out on top in every measurement he threw at it.

In addition to the new structure, the apparent improvement in performance is obviously welcome. This would likely be even more evident where I could leave more dependencies out, for example in API workloads. This obviously won’t magically push Symfony/PHP into Golang or Node.js territory for raw API throughput, but for existing large code bases it could provide a low-effort boost.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25327

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Symfony Finland: Porting a Symfony 3 application to Flex

Symfony Finland: Porting a Symfony 3 application to Flex

On the Symfony Finland site they’ve posted a retrospective about moving an application from Symfony 3 to Flex including the work that was done in the switch and the performance of the result.

Earlier this year I did some experimenting with a Hybrid state object between Symfony Twig templates and front end JavaScript frameworks. Since that time I did that experiment, the Symfony Flex project has progressed. I thought I would try how to port the state prototype to Symfony Flex.

[...] In my case the application was rather simple and all built in the AppBundle, which is best-practise in Symfony3 for many applications. I mostly had to move files and configurations around and change namespaces.

He starts by spending some time talking about the difference between a Symfony 3 environment and the environment Flex provides. He then goes through the eight or so steps to move from one to the other including file/directory changes and configuration updates. Next comes the look at performance differences between the two. Unsurprisingly Flex came out on top in every measurement he threw at it.

In addition to the new structure, the apparent improvement in performance is obviously welcome. This would likely be even more evident where I could leave more dependencies out, for example in API workloads. This obviously won’t magically push Symfony/PHP into Golang or Node.js territory for raw API throughput, but for existing large code bases it could provide a low-effort boost.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25327

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Symfony Finland: Porting a Symfony 3 application to Flex

Symfony Finland: Porting a Symfony 3 application to Flex

On the Symfony Finland site they’ve posted a retrospective about moving an application from Symfony 3 to Flex including the work that was done in the switch and the performance of the result.

Earlier this year I did some experimenting with a Hybrid state object between Symfony Twig templates and front end JavaScript frameworks. Since that time I did that experiment, the Symfony Flex project has progressed. I thought I would try how to port the state prototype to Symfony Flex.

[...] In my case the application was rather simple and all built in the AppBundle, which is best-practise in Symfony3 for many applications. I mostly had to move files and configurations around and change namespaces.

He starts by spending some time talking about the difference between a Symfony 3 environment and the environment Flex provides. He then goes through the eight or so steps to move from one to the other including file/directory changes and configuration updates. Next comes the look at performance differences between the two. Unsurprisingly Flex came out on top in every measurement he threw at it.

In addition to the new structure, the apparent improvement in performance is obviously welcome. This would likely be even more evident where I could leave more dependencies out, for example in API workloads. This obviously won’t magically push Symfony/PHP into Golang or Node.js territory for raw API throughput, but for existing large code bases it could provide a low-effort boost.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25327

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Symfony Finland: Porting a Symfony 3 application to Flex

Symfony Finland: Porting a Symfony 3 application to Flex

On the Symfony Finland site they’ve posted a retrospective about moving an application from Symfony 3 to Flex including the work that was done in the switch and the performance of the result.

Earlier this year I did some experimenting with a Hybrid state object between Symfony Twig templates and front end JavaScript frameworks. Since that time I did that experiment, the Symfony Flex project has progressed. I thought I would try how to port the state prototype to Symfony Flex.

[...] In my case the application was rather simple and all built in the AppBundle, which is best-practise in Symfony3 for many applications. I mostly had to move files and configurations around and change namespaces.

He starts by spending some time talking about the difference between a Symfony 3 environment and the environment Flex provides. He then goes through the eight or so steps to move from one to the other including file/directory changes and configuration updates. Next comes the look at performance differences between the two. Unsurprisingly Flex came out on top in every measurement he threw at it.

In addition to the new structure, the apparent improvement in performance is obviously welcome. This would likely be even more evident where I could leave more dependencies out, for example in API workloads. This obviously won’t magically push Symfony/PHP into Golang or Node.js territory for raw API throughput, but for existing large code bases it could provide a low-effort boost.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25327

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Cal Evans: Mautic Step 1 – Configuring an Email Service Provider

Cal Evans: Mautic Step 1 – Configuring an Email Service Provider

Cal Evans has continued his series covering Mautic, the PHP based self-hosted marketing automation platform. This is step one in the process with his previous post in the series introducing Mautic and why he’s trying it out.

This is the second post in a series titled “My Journey into Mautic”. If you are starting here, you might get an incomplete picture, you may want to check out the previous articles.

There are two things that really confuse me about Mautic, properly configuring an Email Service Provider (ESP), and segmenting & tagging. We’ll tackle the latter one in a later post, but the former is an important topic. It is also one that I do not fully understand. What is presented here is what I have learned through trial and error. it my be partially or wholly incorrect. If you find something that I’ve gotten wrong, please, by all means, correct me in the comments.

He starts by defining what an ESP service is and what it’s useful for. While he had done the self-hosted email server in the past, he recommends paying for a service these days, deciding for his needs on Mailgun. He covers the difference between transactional and broadcast emails followed by the setup process he followed to get Mailgun up and working with his Mautic install.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25326

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Community News: Latest PEAR Releases (06.26.2017)

Community News: Latest PEAR Releases (06.26.2017)

Latest PEAR Releases:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25325

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Cloudways Blog: Create A Contact Form In Laravel That Sends You An Email

Cloudways Blog: Create A Contact Form In Laravel That Sends You An Email

On the Cloudways blog they’ve posted a tutorial showing you how to create a simple contact form that emails when someone fills it out and the information they submitted.

Laravel is well known for providing multiple solutions for a problem. This is one of the main reasons of the popularity of the framework. Popular Laravel solutions cover routine functionality such as authentication, sessions, routing, and caching.

Contact Us forms are another routine functionality that is a requirement of more or less every website. In this article, I am going to demonstrate how you can easily create a contact form in Laravel with email. To understand the functionality of Laravel mail function. I suggest you read my previous article on sending emails in Laravel.

The author then walks you through the installation of a new Laravel application on the Cloudways service. He then shows how to install the "Form" package (laravelcollective/html) and enable it as a service provider. Next up comes the database configuration and the creation of the table to handle the data submitted via the "Contact Us" form. The model is then created to work with the table, the route is added to show the form (and handle the submission) as well as the matching view and controller. The post wraps up with the commands and configuration you’ll need to send the emails and an example of a "mailable" class to handle the email’s construction.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25324

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Cloudways Blog: Create A Contact Form In Laravel That Sends You An Email

Cloudways Blog: Create A Contact Form In Laravel That Sends You An Email

On the Cloudways blog they’ve posted a tutorial showing you how to create a simple contact form that emails when someone fills it out and the information they submitted.

Laravel is well known for providing multiple solutions for a problem. This is one of the main reasons of the popularity of the framework. Popular Laravel solutions cover routine functionality such as authentication, sessions, routing, and caching.

Contact Us forms are another routine functionality that is a requirement of more or less every website. In this article, I am going to demonstrate how you can easily create a contact form in Laravel with email. To understand the functionality of Laravel mail function. I suggest you read my previous article on sending emails in Laravel.

The author then walks you through the installation of a new Laravel application on the Cloudways service. He then shows how to install the "Form" package (laravelcollective/html) and enable it as a service provider. Next up comes the database configuration and the creation of the table to handle the data submitted via the "Contact Us" form. The model is then created to work with the table, the route is added to show the form (and handle the submission) as well as the matching view and controller. The post wraps up with the commands and configuration you’ll need to send the emails and an example of a "mailable" class to handle the email’s construction.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25324

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

9Lessons.info: Ionic 3 and Angular 4: PHP Restful API User Authentication for Login and Signup

9Lessons.info: Ionic 3 and Angular 4: PHP Restful API User Authentication for Login and Signup

On the 9Lessons.info site they’ve posted a tutorial walking you through the creation of an application using Iconic 3, Angular 4 and a PHP restful API and how to handle user authentication and signup. It’s a continuation from this previous post that kicked off the series.

Today’s post explains how to implement login authentication system for your AngularJS applications. It will show you how to log in with a user and store the user session, so it deals with token based authentication. Since we are using token based authentication, it protects if any unauthorized request is made and notices for a new login if required. This makes your application’s authentication to be more secured compared with any other authentication system. Every user details will be stored in an external database and a PHP based API is used in the backend for handling this authentication. Hope you’ll find it more easily using this as your authentication system in your AngularJS projects.

They assume you’ve worked through the previous post and already have the basic structure of the application set up. They share a screencast showing the process but also include the key details – database tables, code and markup – in the post for those that prefer to follow along that way.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25323

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

9Lessons.info: Ionic 3 and Angular 4: PHP Restful API User Authentication for Login and Signup

9Lessons.info: Ionic 3 and Angular 4: PHP Restful API User Authentication for Login and Signup

On the 9Lessons.info site they’ve posted a tutorial walking you through the creation of an application using Iconic 3, Angular 4 and a PHP restful API and how to handle user authentication and signup. It’s a continuation from this previous post that kicked off the series.

Today’s post explains how to implement login authentication system for your AngularJS applications. It will show you how to log in with a user and store the user session, so it deals with token based authentication. Since we are using token based authentication, it protects if any unauthorized request is made and notices for a new login if required. This makes your application’s authentication to be more secured compared with any other authentication system. Every user details will be stored in an external database and a PHP based API is used in the backend for handling this authentication. Hope you’ll find it more easily using this as your authentication system in your AngularJS projects.

They assume you’ve worked through the previous post and already have the basic structure of the application set up. They share a screencast showing the process but also include the key details – database tables, code and markup – in the post for those that prefer to follow along that way.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25323

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>