Jeśli jesteś właścicielem tej strony, możesz wyłączyć reklamę poniżej zmieniając pakiet na PRO lub VIP w panelu naszego hostingu już od 4zł!

Archive for Kwiecień, 2017

PHP Town Hall Podcast: Episode 53: Developer Relations, Travel, and Bedbugs with Jessica Rose

PHP Town Hall Podcast: Episode 53: Developer Relations, Travel, and Bedbugs with Jessica Rose

The PHP Town Hall podcast, with hosts Amanda Folson and Ben Edmunds, has released its latest episode: Episode #53 – Developer Relations, Travel, and Bedbugs with Jessica Rose
. Jessica is the lead of developer relations at Crate.io, the company that created the CrateDB product.

Jessica talks about some of her own experiences in developer relations along with some of Amanda’s own experiences doing the same in past roles. They also talk about the strain developer relations can put on other parts of peoples’ lives and different perspectives on work. They also talk about programming bootcamps, online training, hammocks and speaking at conferences.

You can catch this latest episode either using the in-page audio or video player or you can download the audio and listen offline. If you enjoy the show you can subscribe to their feed to get the latest episodes as they’re released.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25138

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

CloudWays Blog: Phil Sturgeon Talks About API Development, PHP-FIG, PHP Books And The Future Of PHP

CloudWays Blog: Phil Sturgeon Talks About API Development, PHP-FIG, PHP Books And The Future Of PHP

On the Cloudways blog there’s a new post sharing an interview with Phil Sturgeon with some of his thoughts about API development, the PHP-FIG organization, PHP-related books and the future of the language.

Today we are super excited to have Phil Sturgeon with us for this interview. Phil is a cool dude and an experienced API dev. He has a lot of experience in creating API for different platforms. Right now, he is working at WeWork as a Platform Engineer. He has written an excellent book on creating API, “Build APIs You Won’t Hate”. He has worked with popular PHP tools and frameworks including CodeIgniter, FuelPHP, PyroCMS. Phil also contributed to PHP The Right Way and PHP-FIG.

Phil also speaks at PHP conferences and often mentors budding developers. In this Interview he talks about his development experiences, workflows and experience with API development.

In the interview Phil answers questions about:

  • how he got started in PHP development
  • his opinions on PHP 7.x
  • preferred development workflows
  • his (previous) involvement with the PHP-FIG
  • his speaking and the topics he usually covers

Check out the full interview for answers to these and other questions.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25137

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

CloudWays Blog: Phil Sturgeon Talks About API Development, PHP-FIG, PHP Books And The Future Of PHP

CloudWays Blog: Phil Sturgeon Talks About API Development, PHP-FIG, PHP Books And The Future Of PHP

On the Cloudways blog there’s a new post sharing an interview with Phil Sturgeon with some of his thoughts about API development, the PHP-FIG organization, PHP-related books and the future of the language.

Today we are super excited to have Phil Sturgeon with us for this interview. Phil is a cool dude and an experienced API dev. He has a lot of experience in creating API for different platforms. Right now, he is working at WeWork as a Platform Engineer. He has written an excellent book on creating API, “Build APIs You Won’t Hate”. He has worked with popular PHP tools and frameworks including CodeIgniter, FuelPHP, PyroCMS. Phil also contributed to PHP The Right Way and PHP-FIG.

Phil also speaks at PHP conferences and often mentors budding developers. In this Interview he talks about his development experiences, workflows and experience with API development.

In the interview Phil answers questions about:

  • how he got started in PHP development
  • his opinions on PHP 7.x
  • preferred development workflows
  • his (previous) involvement with the PHP-FIG
  • his speaking and the topics he usually covers

Check out the full interview for answers to these and other questions.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25137

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

CloudWays Blog: Phil Sturgeon Talks About API Development, PHP-FIG, PHP Books And The Future Of PHP

CloudWays Blog: Phil Sturgeon Talks About API Development, PHP-FIG, PHP Books And The Future Of PHP

On the Cloudways blog there’s a new post sharing an interview with Phil Sturgeon with some of his thoughts about API development, the PHP-FIG organization, PHP-related books and the future of the language.

Today we are super excited to have Phil Sturgeon with us for this interview. Phil is a cool dude and an experienced API dev. He has a lot of experience in creating API for different platforms. Right now, he is working at WeWork as a Platform Engineer. He has written an excellent book on creating API, “Build APIs You Won’t Hate”. He has worked with popular PHP tools and frameworks including CodeIgniter, FuelPHP, PyroCMS. Phil also contributed to PHP The Right Way and PHP-FIG.

Phil also speaks at PHP conferences and often mentors budding developers. In this Interview he talks about his development experiences, workflows and experience with API development.

In the interview Phil answers questions about:

  • how he got started in PHP development
  • his opinions on PHP 7.x
  • preferred development workflows
  • his (previous) involvement with the PHP-FIG
  • his speaking and the topics he usually covers

Check out the full interview for answers to these and other questions.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25137

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

TechBeacon.com: 35 programming habits that make your code smell

TechBeacon.com: 35 programming habits that make your code smell

The Tech Beacon site has posted a list of thirty-five programming habits that make your code "smell", little things that you might do every day without knowing they could be causing issues with the long term maintenance of your code.

Bad habits are hard to break and even harder if you don’t realize that what you’re doing is undermining your work. If you know but don’t care—that would be the worst. But you’re here, aren’t you?

As a programmer, I’ve seen a lot of poor practices, not just around code, but also around teamwork skills. I’ve been guilty of practicing many of these bad habits myself. Here are my top 35 bad programming habits, organized into four categories: code organization, teamwork, writing code, and testing and maintenance.

They’ve broken up the bad habits into different categories to make it a bit easier to consume:

  • Code organization
  • Teamwork
  • Writing code
  • Testing and maintenance

I think just about any developer out there as, at one time or another, fallen into the trap of one or more of these bad habits.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25136

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

TechBeacon.com: 35 programming habits that make your code smell

TechBeacon.com: 35 programming habits that make your code smell

The Tech Beacon site has posted a list of thirty-five programming habits that make your code "smell", little things that you might do every day without knowing they could be causing issues with the long term maintenance of your code.

Bad habits are hard to break and even harder if you don’t realize that what you’re doing is undermining your work. If you know but don’t care—that would be the worst. But you’re here, aren’t you?

As a programmer, I’ve seen a lot of poor practices, not just around code, but also around teamwork skills. I’ve been guilty of practicing many of these bad habits myself. Here are my top 35 bad programming habits, organized into four categories: code organization, teamwork, writing code, and testing and maintenance.

They’ve broken up the bad habits into different categories to make it a bit easier to consume:

  • Code organization
  • Teamwork
  • Writing code
  • Testing and maintenance

I think just about any developer out there as, at one time or another, fallen into the trap of one or more of these bad habits.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25136

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Hackernoon.com: How to configure PHPStorm to use PHP-CS-Fixer

Hackernoon.com: How to configure PHPStorm to use PHP-CS-Fixer

On the Hackernoon site there’s a recent tutorial showing you how to hook the PHP-CS-Fixer tool into PhpStorm for easy execution during development rather than after.

The PHPStorm IDE by JetBrains is probably one of my favorite editors. It has its flaws (constant indexing…) but overall its a great tool for me. However, my focus today is not on PHPStorm per say but rather how to add the awesome functionality of using PHP-CS-Fixer to PHPStorm’s already awesome tools. I am not going to cover the setup of PHP-CS-Fixer because its pretty well covered on the project page. Depending on your platform you will need to make some decisions, namely how you configure the rules of PHP-CS-Fixer. I am currently on Windows but I will try to make sure these instructions work in both *nix and Windows environments.

He then walks you through some prerequisites (both pieces of software installed basically) and the decisions to make based on your platform. He then provides screenshots and descriptions showing where to go in the PhpStorm IDE to add the PHP-CS-Fixer as a new "Tool", the working directory to use and how to set up a keymap to execute the tool. He includes an example of the output when things are correctly configured and working together.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25135

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Hackernoon.com: How to configure PHPStorm to use PHP-CS-Fixer

Hackernoon.com: How to configure PHPStorm to use PHP-CS-Fixer

On the Hackernoon site there’s a recent tutorial showing you how to hook the PHP-CS-Fixer tool into PhpStorm for easy execution during development rather than after.

The PHPStorm IDE by JetBrains is probably one of my favorite editors. It has its flaws (constant indexing…) but overall its a great tool for me. However, my focus today is not on PHPStorm per say but rather how to add the awesome functionality of using PHP-CS-Fixer to PHPStorm’s already awesome tools. I am not going to cover the setup of PHP-CS-Fixer because its pretty well covered on the project page. Depending on your platform you will need to make some decisions, namely how you configure the rules of PHP-CS-Fixer. I am currently on Windows but I will try to make sure these instructions work in both *nix and Windows environments.

He then walks you through some prerequisites (both pieces of software installed basically) and the decisions to make based on your platform. He then provides screenshots and descriptions showing where to go in the PhpStorm IDE to add the PHP-CS-Fixer as a new "Tool", the working directory to use and how to set up a keymap to execute the tool. He includes an example of the output when things are correctly configured and working together.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25135

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Hackernoon.com: How to configure PHPStorm to use PHP-CS-Fixer

Hackernoon.com: How to configure PHPStorm to use PHP-CS-Fixer

On the Hackernoon site there’s a recent tutorial showing you how to hook the PHP-CS-Fixer tool into PhpStorm for easy execution during development rather than after.

The PHPStorm IDE by JetBrains is probably one of my favorite editors. It has its flaws (constant indexing…) but overall its a great tool for me. However, my focus today is not on PHPStorm per say but rather how to add the awesome functionality of using PHP-CS-Fixer to PHPStorm’s already awesome tools. I am not going to cover the setup of PHP-CS-Fixer because its pretty well covered on the project page. Depending on your platform you will need to make some decisions, namely how you configure the rules of PHP-CS-Fixer. I am currently on Windows but I will try to make sure these instructions work in both *nix and Windows environments.

He then walks you through some prerequisites (both pieces of software installed basically) and the decisions to make based on your platform. He then provides screenshots and descriptions showing where to go in the PhpStorm IDE to add the PHP-CS-Fixer as a new "Tool", the working directory to use and how to set up a keymap to execute the tool. He includes an example of the output when things are correctly configured and working together.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25135

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

SitePoint PHP Blog: How Privileged Are Programmers? Are You a John, Too?

SitePoint PHP Blog: How Privileged Are Programmers? Are You a John, Too?

On the SitePoint PHP blog Christopher Pitt has written up a new article, a story about "John" a developer caricature that’s all too familiar in the development world and how you can grow up from "being a John". It’s all based on Christopher’s own experiences too.

John was a developer. To be specific, he was a young, white, straight, young, self-taught developer. He wasn’t rare, but he was special. John grew up with a couple parents, who paid for everything he needed.

[...] John got average grades, but it was ok because [according to mum]; “he’s just bored of schooling, and too clever”. He walked right out of high-school and into a programming job. The pay wasn’t great; only enough for a small apartment and modest groceries [for one]. In time he’d earn more. [...] Over the years, John quickly got bored of programming. He loved the thought of the career, but it was all so boring. He moved jobs every year or so, and only then when his idiot bosses stopped seeing how much he mattered to their company.

He talks about his own past, how he realized he was a "John" and how he made the conscious decision to grow up and out of that situation. He talks about those being born into comfort and how they’re not always forced to grow up or to really struggle. He mentions other common "John" points of view ("we can always just move jobs" or "meetings are just a distraction"). He’s angry with himself for seeing so much of his previous life in these examples. He’s also angry to see these same patterns in other developers around him, other "Johns" that treat him the same way with excuses, failed promises and delays.

I think of all these clever little things I could do, to force John to work. All these processes and mantras and check-lists. Then I despair. The only thing that’s going to make John realise he is wasting away is wasting away enough to fall through his safety net. He’s going to have to grow up on his own, and maybe then he’ll pay it forward to his future employers and clients.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25134

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>