Jeśli jesteś właścicielem tej strony, możesz wyłączyć reklamę poniżej zmieniając pakiet na PRO lub VIP w panelu naszego hostingu już od 4zł!

Archive for Styczeń, 2017

Scotch.io: Laravel Random Keys with Keygen

Scotch.io: Laravel Random Keys with Keygen

On the Scotch.io site they’ve posted a new Laravel-related tutorial covering the use of the keygen package to generate random keys via four generator types. These keys can be used for just about anything in your application and can be customized to fit your length and complexity requirements. One thing to note, however, is that the strings it generates are random but should not be considered strong enough to use for actual encryption purposes.

When developing applications, it is usually common to see randomness come into play – and as a result, many programming languages have built-in random generation mechanisms.

[...] When your application is required to generate very simple random character sequences like those enumerated above, then the Keygen package is a good option to go for. Keygen is a PHP package for generating simple random character sequences of any desired length and it ships with four generators, namely: numeric, alphanumeric, token and bytes.

For their example they chose to create a simple REST API service that allows for user creation, viewing users and generating a random (temporary) password using the Keygen package. They start by helping you get the package installed (via Composer) and adding an alias to your Laravel config for "Keygen" to make it easier to access. They then create the user model and add in a "setEmailAttribute" method to verify the email value submitted (for format and uniqueness). Next up is the route definition for the "user" endpoints, creation of the API controller and implementing the Keygen tool to create a random eight digit code for the user. They also include a few strategies to ensure the code generated (and the resulting hash) is unique across all users. The reminder of the post shows the full user creation, and implementing the remaining methods required to view the user’s details.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24854

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Scotch.io: Laravel Random Keys with Keygen

Scotch.io: Laravel Random Keys with Keygen

On the Scotch.io site they’ve posted a new Laravel-related tutorial covering the use of the keygen package to generate random keys via four generator types. These keys can be used for just about anything in your application and can be customized to fit your length and complexity requirements. One thing to note, however, is that the strings it generates are random but should not be considered strong enough to use for actual encryption purposes.

When developing applications, it is usually common to see randomness come into play – and as a result, many programming languages have built-in random generation mechanisms.

[...] When your application is required to generate very simple random character sequences like those enumerated above, then the Keygen package is a good option to go for. Keygen is a PHP package for generating simple random character sequences of any desired length and it ships with four generators, namely: numeric, alphanumeric, token and bytes.

For their example they chose to create a simple REST API service that allows for user creation, viewing users and generating a random (temporary) password using the Keygen package. They start by helping you get the package installed (via Composer) and adding an alias to your Laravel config for "Keygen" to make it easier to access. They then create the user model and add in a "setEmailAttribute" method to verify the email value submitted (for format and uniqueness). Next up is the route definition for the "user" endpoints, creation of the API controller and implementing the Keygen tool to create a random eight digit code for the user. They also include a few strategies to ensure the code generated (and the resulting hash) is unique across all users. The reminder of the post shows the full user creation, and implementing the remaining methods required to view the user’s details.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24854

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Arpatech.com: 9 Things You Should Need to Know About PHP 7

Arpatech.com: 9 Things You Should Need to Know About PHP 7

The Arpatech.com blog has a new post sharing their list of top nine things to know about PHP 7 with some brief explanations for each. It’s not an in-depth coverage of the features in this latest major release of the language but it does give a nice overview for those not familiar with what really changed.

If you are a web developer or a website owner, and you love to use CMS that are PHP-enabled like WordPress, Drupal, Joomla or Magento, you should rejoice to hear that according to official PHP timetable, PHP 7 which was released on 3 December 2015, is now ready for the production use.

Yes you heard it right! PHP 7 is out to use. We are going to tell all the great things you need to know about PHP 7.

They’ve included several types of topics in their list, both code and performance related:

  • PHPNG, the New Core
  • Double the Speed
  • New Spaceship (<=>) and Null Coalescing (??) Operators
  • Enables Accurate Type Declarations
  • Imports from the Same Namespace

Each item on the list comes with a brief summary of what the improvement offers and, in the case of code-related items, a quick snippet showing it in action.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24853

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Arpatech.com: 9 Things You Should Need to Know About PHP 7

Arpatech.com: 9 Things You Should Need to Know About PHP 7

The Arpatech.com blog has a new post sharing their list of top nine things to know about PHP 7 with some brief explanations for each. It’s not an in-depth coverage of the features in this latest major release of the language but it does give a nice overview for those not familiar with what really changed.

If you are a web developer or a website owner, and you love to use CMS that are PHP-enabled like WordPress, Drupal, Joomla or Magento, you should rejoice to hear that according to official PHP timetable, PHP 7 which was released on 3 December 2015, is now ready for the production use.

Yes you heard it right! PHP 7 is out to use. We are going to tell all the great things you need to know about PHP 7.

They’ve included several types of topics in their list, both code and performance related:

  • PHPNG, the New Core
  • Double the Speed
  • New Spaceship (<=>) and Null Coalescing (??) Operators
  • Enables Accurate Type Declarations
  • Imports from the Same Namespace

Each item on the list comes with a brief summary of what the improvement offers and, in the case of code-related items, a quick snippet showing it in action.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24853

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Arpatech.com: 9 Things You Should Need to Know About PHP 7

Arpatech.com: 9 Things You Should Need to Know About PHP 7

The Arpatech.com blog has a new post sharing their list of top nine things to know about PHP 7 with some brief explanations for each. It’s not an in-depth coverage of the features in this latest major release of the language but it does give a nice overview for those not familiar with what really changed.

If you are a web developer or a website owner, and you love to use CMS that are PHP-enabled like WordPress, Drupal, Joomla or Magento, you should rejoice to hear that according to official PHP timetable, PHP 7 which was released on 3 December 2015, is now ready for the production use.

Yes you heard it right! PHP 7 is out to use. We are going to tell all the great things you need to know about PHP 7.

They’ve included several types of topics in their list, both code and performance related:

  • PHPNG, the New Core
  • Double the Speed
  • New Spaceship (<=>) and Null Coalescing (??) Operators
  • Enables Accurate Type Declarations
  • Imports from the Same Namespace

Each item on the list comes with a brief summary of what the improvement offers and, in the case of code-related items, a quick snippet showing it in action.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24853

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Laravel News: Habits of Highly Productive Tech Teams

Laravel News: Habits of Highly Productive Tech Teams

On the Laravel News site there’s an article posted from Sharon Steed covering some habits of highly productive tech teams including topics like trust, meetings and understanding roles.

There’s always a lot of talk about “culture” on tech teams. And that makes sense: managers generally hire people that will fit in well with the group they’ve assembled because they know there’s more to work than just doing the job. Being able to get along with your coworkers, being reliable, and looking the part are also important. A big part of building a solid company culture is about creating an environment which helps your employees be productive. Unfortunately, a lot of what we do in tech has the opposite effect.

She talks about the role of perks in an effective workforce and how, despite some seeming very nice on the outside, can cause burnout as it encourages longer work hours than normal. From there she moves into some suggestions about "meeting culture" and some of the major drawbacks to meetings (including how they can distract from "real, paying work"). There’s a nice flow chart included in the post too that can help you determine if a meeting is really necessary or not. From there she goes on to talk about the other two topics mentioned above – employees knowing and understanding their roles and fostering trust between them through things like delegation and effective listening.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24852

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Matthew Weier O’Phinney: PSR-7 Request and Method Utilities

Matthew Weier O’Phinney: PSR-7 Request and Method Utilities

Matthew Weier O’Phinney has written up a new post for his site covering PSR-7 request and method utilities and a package that contains some handy tools to help with just that.

Some time ago, a few folks floated the idea of creating a utility repository related to the PSR-7 psr/http-message package, but containing some useful bits such as constants for HTTP request methods and status codes.

Six months ago, we released it… but didn’t publicize it. I remembered that fact today while writing some unit tests that were utilizing the package, and thought I’d finally write it up.

The package is fig/http-message-util, and is available via Composer and Packagist.

He goes on to describe the two interfaces it provides (RequestMethod and StatusCode) and what they’re designed to help with. He includes an example of middleware written using these interfaces, defining allowed methods and returning a "method not allowed" status code – based on a constant – in the response message object. He ends the post with two quick points to note in this example: how the interfaces are used and his use of aliases to make using the interfaces just a bit shorter.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24851

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Matthew Weier O’Phinney: PSR-7 Request and Method Utilities

Matthew Weier O’Phinney: PSR-7 Request and Method Utilities

Matthew Weier O’Phinney has written up a new post for his site covering PSR-7 request and method utilities and a package that contains some handy tools to help with just that.

Some time ago, a few folks floated the idea of creating a utility repository related to the PSR-7 psr/http-message package, but containing some useful bits such as constants for HTTP request methods and status codes.

Six months ago, we released it… but didn’t publicize it. I remembered that fact today while writing some unit tests that were utilizing the package, and thought I’d finally write it up.

The package is fig/http-message-util, and is available via Composer and Packagist.

He goes on to describe the two interfaces it provides (RequestMethod and StatusCode) and what they’re designed to help with. He includes an example of middleware written using these interfaces, defining allowed methods and returning a "method not allowed" status code – based on a constant – in the response message object. He ends the post with two quick points to note in this example: how the interfaces are used and his use of aliases to make using the interfaces just a bit shorter.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24851

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (01.27.2017)

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (01.27.2017)

Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24850

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (01.27.2017)

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (01.27.2017)

Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24850

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>