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Archive for Listopad, 2016

Joe Ferguson: Use Laravel Shift for your next upgrade

Joe Ferguson: Use Laravel Shift for your next upgrade

In this new post to his site Joe Ferguson takes a look at Laravel Shift, an automated service that makes it easier to upgrade your Laravel-based application quickly.

I’ve had an eye on LaravelShift.com since it first made it’s way across my twitter feed some time ago. I’ve also had the pleasure of meeting and talking with it’s creator Jason McCreary at a few conferences over the past year. I think it’s really awesome when community members are able to take a product to market that not only scratches their own itch, but can provide value to the rest of the community as well.

[...] I built NerdsAreDrinking on Laravel 5.1 because that was the current version at the time. We have seen two more release since: 5.2 and 5.3. The upgrade process isn’t terrible however there is a lot you may need to take into account. Rather than upgrade from 5.1 to 5.2 and then 5.2 to 5.3 I decided to use Laravel Shift to do the 5.1 to 5.2 upgrade for me.

Joe then talks some about his experience using the service and was impressed at the speed of the service to create the required Pull Request for the update. He includes a link to the PR so you can see what the upgrade looks like too. He feels like the money spent (around $11 USD) was well invested and would definitely use the service again.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24625

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Joe Ferguson: Use Laravel Shift for your next upgrade

Joe Ferguson: Use Laravel Shift for your next upgrade

In this new post to his site Joe Ferguson takes a look at Laravel Shift, an automated service that makes it easier to upgrade your Laravel-based application quickly.

I’ve had an eye on LaravelShift.com since it first made it’s way across my twitter feed some time ago. I’ve also had the pleasure of meeting and talking with it’s creator Jason McCreary at a few conferences over the past year. I think it’s really awesome when community members are able to take a product to market that not only scratches their own itch, but can provide value to the rest of the community as well.

[...] I built NerdsAreDrinking on Laravel 5.1 because that was the current version at the time. We have seen two more release since: 5.2 and 5.3. The upgrade process isn’t terrible however there is a lot you may need to take into account. Rather than upgrade from 5.1 to 5.2 and then 5.2 to 5.3 I decided to use Laravel Shift to do the 5.1 to 5.2 upgrade for me.

Joe then talks some about his experience using the service and was impressed at the speed of the service to create the required Pull Request for the update. He includes a link to the PR so you can see what the upgrade looks like too. He feels like the money spent (around $11 USD) was well invested and would definitely use the service again.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24625

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
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Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHP (11.24.2016)

Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHP (11.24.2016)

Here’s what was popular in the PHP community one year ago today:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24624

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Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHP (11.24.2016)

Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHP (11.24.2016)

Here’s what was popular in the PHP community one year ago today:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24624

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHP (11.24.2016)

Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHP (11.24.2016)

Here’s what was popular in the PHP community one year ago today:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24624

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
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Paul Jones: The PHP 7 “Request” Extension

Paul Jones: The PHP 7 “Request” Extension

Paul Jones has a new post to his site introducing the "Request" extension he and John Boehr have worked up to make working with HTTP requests in PHP simpler.

You’re tired of dealing with the $_GET, $_POST, etc. superglobals in your PHP 7 application. You wish $_FILES was easer to deal with. You’d prefer to wrap them all in an object to pass around to your class methods, so they’d be easier to test. [...] You could maybe adopt a framework, but why do that for your custom project? Just a pair of server-side request and response objects would make your life so much easer. Why can’t there be set of internal PHP classes for that?

Well, now there is. You can install the request extension from John Boehr and myself to get ServerRequest and ServerReponse objects as if PHP itself provided them.

He gives an example of using the extension to work with both the request and response (ServerRequest and ServerResponse). This includes cookie values, files handling, content length and much more. There’s code examples showing it in use and a link to the repository for the extension where you can find out more.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24623

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Laravel News: New Book: Laravel Up and Running

Laravel News: New Book: Laravel Up and Running

The Laravel News site has a post about the official release of a new Laravel-related book, "Laravel Up and Running" from author and well-known Laravel-er Matt Stauffer.

Matt Stauffer who has been blogging about Laravel since the 5.0 release, the host of the Laravel Podcast, and partner and technical director at Tighten.co has been working on a new Laravel book, Laravel: Up & Running, published by O’Reilly.

The post lists out just some of the topics the book covers including:

  • Tools for gathering, validating, normalizing, and filtering user-provided data
  • PHPUnit, Mockery, and PHPSpec for testing your PHP code
  • Interfaces for file system access, sessions, cookies, caches, and search
  • Laravel’s specialty packages: Scout, Passport, Cashier, Echo, Elixir, Valet, and Socialite

You can order it now from O’Reilly as an ebook but the paperback will follow soon. The post also includes a mini-interview from Matt about the release of his book.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24622

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Community News: Recent posts from PHP Quickfix (11.23.2016)

Community News: Recent posts from PHP Quickfix (11.23.2016)

Recent posts from the PHP Quickfix site:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24621

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Alison Gianotto: Demystifying Custom Auth in Laravel 5

Alison Gianotto: Demystifying Custom Auth in Laravel 5

Alison Gianotto (a.k.a. Snipe) has a new post on her site talking about custom authentication in Laravel-based applications including built-in functionality and how you can override it to your needs.

I’m a big fan of Laravel. I use it in most of my personal and professional projects, and for the most part it really does make coding fun for me again. One of the things Laravel tries to do (similar to Rails) is to build in the most repetitive things a developer would have to do, for example a user registration/login/forgotten password system.

[...] In each of my current Laravel apps, auth works just a tiny bit differently. Add to that the fact that a few of them were pulled forward from Laravel version 4.2, and things can get confusing and messy. [...] Laravel makes this really, really easy – they just don’t document how to do it very well.

She starts by mentioning the "fresh" install version of building out the auth pieces (php artisan make:auth) but points out that, if a more "hybrid" system is needed, a bit more work is required. She shows you the routes that are created in the "make:auth" process and how/where you need to modify things to customize it to your system. She illustrates with some of her own changes including code examples.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24615

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Alison Gianotto: Demystifying Custom Auth in Laravel 5

Alison Gianotto: Demystifying Custom Auth in Laravel 5

Alison Gianotto (a.k.a. Snipe) has a new post on her site talking about custom authentication in Laravel-based applications including built-in functionality and how you can override it to your needs.

I’m a big fan of Laravel. I use it in most of my personal and professional projects, and for the most part it really does make coding fun for me again. One of the things Laravel tries to do (similar to Rails) is to build in the most repetitive things a developer would have to do, for example a user registration/login/forgotten password system.

[...] In each of my current Laravel apps, auth works just a tiny bit differently. Add to that the fact that a few of them were pulled forward from Laravel version 4.2, and things can get confusing and messy. [...] Laravel makes this really, really easy – they just don’t document how to do it very well.

She starts by mentioning the "fresh" install version of building out the auth pieces (php artisan make:auth) but points out that, if a more "hybrid" system is needed, a bit more work is required. She shows you the routes that are created in the "make:auth" process and how/where you need to modify things to customize it to your system. She illustrates with some of her own changes including code examples.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24615

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>