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Archive for Listopad, 2016

SitePoint PHP Blog: Pay the Price for Open Source

SitePoint PHP Blog: Pay the Price for Open Source

The SitePoint PHP blog has a post from the godfather of the PHP community Cal Evans about paying the price for open source – giving back to Open Source projects that you use every day.

Back in the early days of Open Source – when Dinosaurs roamed the earth and Rasmus was a young man – there were two types of open source projects we talked about: those that didn’t cost any money, and those that gave you the freedom to redistribute and modify the code.

[...] Fast forward a few dozen years and here we are, Open Source is now an ecosystem, not a user group that you and five friends attend, or a magazine to which you subscribe. The problem is that most of us have stopped talking about the different types of open source, we just assume it is both.

He talks about how PHP is technically both kinds of free but also points out that open source will potentially die out (as it is now) without one major piece – users contributing back, giving their time and effort to keep it (and related projects) free. He talks about how you can give back, and not necessarily monetarily. He talks about one of his own experiences with giving back (to WordPress) when his work wasn’t accepted, but he also points out that even though it may be rejected it doesn’t mean you should stop.

What ever project you are working with, take the time to give back. Don’t let Open Source die in our generation.

Preserve this great concept; this ecosystem that we have helped build and that has allowed us to build so much. If you are a developer, find your favorite project and give back. If you run a company or a team of developers, give them time on your dime to give back to a project. Help keep the Open Source ecosystem thriving for the next generation of developers.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24630

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SitePoint PHP Blog: Pay the Price for Open Source

SitePoint PHP Blog: Pay the Price for Open Source

The SitePoint PHP blog has a post from the godfather of the PHP community Cal Evans about paying the price for open source – giving back to Open Source projects that you use every day.

Back in the early days of Open Source – when Dinosaurs roamed the earth and Rasmus was a young man – there were two types of open source projects we talked about: those that didn’t cost any money, and those that gave you the freedom to redistribute and modify the code.

[...] Fast forward a few dozen years and here we are, Open Source is now an ecosystem, not a user group that you and five friends attend, or a magazine to which you subscribe. The problem is that most of us have stopped talking about the different types of open source, we just assume it is both.

He talks about how PHP is technically both kinds of free but also points out that open source will potentially die out (as it is now) without one major piece – users contributing back, giving their time and effort to keep it (and related projects) free. He talks about how you can give back, and not necessarily monetarily. He talks about one of his own experiences with giving back (to WordPress) when his work wasn’t accepted, but he also points out that even though it may be rejected it doesn’t mean you should stop.

What ever project you are working with, take the time to give back. Don’t let Open Source die in our generation.

Preserve this great concept; this ecosystem that we have helped build and that has allowed us to build so much. If you are a developer, find your favorite project and give back. If you run a company or a team of developers, give them time on your dime to give back to a project. Help keep the Open Source ecosystem thriving for the next generation of developers.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24630

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Laravel News: Getting started with Watson Personality Insights

Laravel News: Getting started with Watson Personality Insights

On the Laravel News site there’s a post showing an application of the IBM Watson Personality Insights service to discover trends and make predictions about future actions/preferences. They also show how to integrate it into your Laravel-based application thanks to this package.

One of the most important things as a business owner is being able to understand your customers’ needs and wants; such that you are able to offer them a personalized experience. This works great if you know your customers on a personal level, but what if you don’t?

[...] Sure you could send out a survey from your site, then collect a huge amount of data, then process, analyze and finally being able to tell what package fits which user. This seems tiresome and plus people’s tastes and preferences change over time and you would have to repeat this process over and over again each time you want to offer them something new. There has to be a better way, and there is.

The post talks about the services offered by IBM Watson and, more specifically, about Personality Insights. They cover some about what this service offers as related to web preferences and link to a demo application you can use to get more context about its handling. The post wraps up showing how to integrate the package into your application and working with requests/responses to the IBM Watson Personality Insights service.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24629

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Laravel News: Getting started with Watson Personality Insights

Laravel News: Getting started with Watson Personality Insights

On the Laravel News site there’s a post showing an application of the IBM Watson Personality Insights service to discover trends and make predictions about future actions/preferences. They also show how to integrate it into your Laravel-based application thanks to this package.

One of the most important things as a business owner is being able to understand your customers’ needs and wants; such that you are able to offer them a personalized experience. This works great if you know your customers on a personal level, but what if you don’t?

[...] Sure you could send out a survey from your site, then collect a huge amount of data, then process, analyze and finally being able to tell what package fits which user. This seems tiresome and plus people’s tastes and preferences change over time and you would have to repeat this process over and over again each time you want to offer them something new. There has to be a better way, and there is.

The post talks about the services offered by IBM Watson and, more specifically, about Personality Insights. They cover some about what this service offers as related to web preferences and link to a demo application you can use to get more context about its handling. The post wraps up showing how to integrate the package into your application and working with requests/responses to the IBM Watson Personality Insights service.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24629

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document.writeln('’);
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Laravel News: Getting started with Watson Personality Insights

Laravel News: Getting started with Watson Personality Insights

On the Laravel News site there’s a post showing an application of the IBM Watson Personality Insights service to discover trends and make predictions about future actions/preferences. They also show how to integrate it into your Laravel-based application thanks to this package.

One of the most important things as a business owner is being able to understand your customers’ needs and wants; such that you are able to offer them a personalized experience. This works great if you know your customers on a personal level, but what if you don’t?

[...] Sure you could send out a survey from your site, then collect a huge amount of data, then process, analyze and finally being able to tell what package fits which user. This seems tiresome and plus people’s tastes and preferences change over time and you would have to repeat this process over and over again each time you want to offer them something new. There has to be a better way, and there is.

The post talks about the services offered by IBM Watson and, more specifically, about Personality Insights. They cover some about what this service offers as related to web preferences and link to a demo application you can use to get more context about its handling. The post wraps up showing how to integrate the package into your application and working with requests/responses to the IBM Watson Personality Insights service.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24629

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Kinsta.com Blog: What’s New in PHP 7.1.0

Kinsta.com Blog: What’s New in PHP 7.1.0

On the Kinsta blog there’s a post detailing some of the new features that are coming in the next release in the PHP 7 series – PHP 7.10.

The newest version of PHP – 7.1.0 – is already at RC6 (Release Candidate 6) status, which means it will be out soon. After a huge update that took PHP from 5.6 straight to 7.0 increasing speeds considerably, PHP is now focusing on core language features that will help all of us write better code. In this article I’ll take a look at the major additions and features of PHP 7.1.0 which is just around the bend.

Their list of items includes:

  • nullable types
  • iterable and void returns
  • the use of keys in lists
  • number operators and malformed numbers

Each item in the list includes a brief description and some example code show the feature in use where it makes sense. If you’re not overly familiar with what’s coming in PHP 7.1 this is a great guide.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24628

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Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (11.25.2016)

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (11.25.2016)

Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24627

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TutsPlus.com: Building Your Startup: The Dashboard Foundation

TutsPlus.com: Building Your Startup: The Dashboard Foundation

NetTuts.com has continued their "Building Your Startup" series with this latest post focusing on the dashboard for the users of the meeting planner – a "quick look" into the current stats for their account.

For my initial statistics reporting, I focused on simple real-time data and detailed historical data. For example, real-time data would tell you the number of users and meetings built on the system to date and their status.

The historical data would tell you the number of users and meetings completed over time as well as other interesting data—especially growth curves that I and prospective investors may care about.

He then walks through the creation of the dashboard view, gathering together various pieces of real-time and historical data and displaying them in a simple table view. All code and SQL required is included as well as a few screenshots showing the results.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24626

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TutsPlus.com: Building Your Startup: The Dashboard Foundation

TutsPlus.com: Building Your Startup: The Dashboard Foundation

NetTuts.com has continued their "Building Your Startup" series with this latest post focusing on the dashboard for the users of the meeting planner – a "quick look" into the current stats for their account.

For my initial statistics reporting, I focused on simple real-time data and detailed historical data. For example, real-time data would tell you the number of users and meetings built on the system to date and their status.

The historical data would tell you the number of users and meetings completed over time as well as other interesting data—especially growth curves that I and prospective investors may care about.

He then walks through the creation of the dashboard view, gathering together various pieces of real-time and historical data and displaying them in a simple table view. All code and SQL required is included as well as a few screenshots showing the results.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24626

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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TutsPlus.com: Building Your Startup: The Dashboard Foundation

TutsPlus.com: Building Your Startup: The Dashboard Foundation

NetTuts.com has continued their "Building Your Startup" series with this latest post focusing on the dashboard for the users of the meeting planner – a "quick look" into the current stats for their account.

For my initial statistics reporting, I focused on simple real-time data and detailed historical data. For example, real-time data would tell you the number of users and meetings built on the system to date and their status.

The historical data would tell you the number of users and meetings completed over time as well as other interesting data—especially growth curves that I and prospective investors may care about.

He then walks through the creation of the dashboard view, gathering together various pieces of real-time and historical data and displaying them in a simple table view. All code and SQL required is included as well as a few screenshots showing the results.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24626

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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