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Archive for Wrzesień, 2016

Toptal.com: How Much Coding Should Designers Know?

Toptal.com: How Much Coding Should Designers Know?

The Toptal.com site has an interesting post mostly relevant to those out there that straddle the line between design and development. It wonders how much coding should a designer know to get the job done.

Many designers think each discipline should mind their own business, while others see no problem in professionals wearing multiple hats. Many developers see designers who code as a threat, while others see it as a facilitator. This is a hotly debated subject, and although I think some great designers are also superb at coding, I will always defend that the more you focus on a particular area the best you will be at it. But this shouldn’t be a reason for you to miss out on the benefits of having another skill under your belt.

The article then breaks down the benefits of designers learning to code by levels of knowledge:

  • Step 1: Know the basics of HTML and CSS
  • Step 2: Front-end JavaScript and AJAX could make you a unique asset
  • Step 3: Back-end JavaScript might be overkill
  • Step 4: Database Architecture and Software Engineering Won’t Get Designers Anywhere

For each point there’s a brief explanation of the level of knowledge it represents and what he sees as a general designers attitude towards it.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24435

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Toptal.com: How Much Coding Should Designers Know?

Toptal.com: How Much Coding Should Designers Know?

The Toptal.com site has an interesting post mostly relevant to those out there that straddle the line between design and development. It wonders how much coding should a designer know to get the job done.

Many designers think each discipline should mind their own business, while others see no problem in professionals wearing multiple hats. Many developers see designers who code as a threat, while others see it as a facilitator. This is a hotly debated subject, and although I think some great designers are also superb at coding, I will always defend that the more you focus on a particular area the best you will be at it. But this shouldn’t be a reason for you to miss out on the benefits of having another skill under your belt.

The article then breaks down the benefits of designers learning to code by levels of knowledge:

  • Step 1: Know the basics of HTML and CSS
  • Step 2: Front-end JavaScript and AJAX could make you a unique asset
  • Step 3: Back-end JavaScript might be overkill
  • Step 4: Database Architecture and Software Engineering Won’t Get Designers Anywhere

For each point there’s a brief explanation of the level of knowledge it represents and what he sees as a general designers attitude towards it.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24435

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (09.23.2016)

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (09.23.2016)

Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24434

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document.writeln('’);
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Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (09.23.2016)

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (09.23.2016)

Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24434

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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TutsPlus.com: Building Your Startup With PHP: Simplifying Onramp With OAuth

TutsPlus.com: Building Your Startup With PHP: Simplifying Onramp With OAuth

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next part of their "Build Your Startup with PHP" series today. This time they show you how to make it even easier for the users of your site to sign up using OAuth and third-party authentication.

In this tutorial, I’ll guide you through implementing OAuth integration with common social networks to make signing up and repeated usage easier and more efficient. I’ll explore Facebook, Google, Twitter and LinkedIn, the networks I see as being most appropriate to Meeting Planner’s target users.

The tutorial makes use of the Yii framework’s own AuthClient functionality to make the actual requests to the 3rd party services. They help you get it installed via Composer and the configuration changes you’ll need to make for it to be available and functional.

The tutorial then shows how to create developer applications on a few different services: Twitter, Facebook, Google and LinkedIn. They help you update your configuration with the secret keys for each and create a new database update for storing the 3rd party identifiers when the connection is made. Finally they hook it into the user profile and the login page for use by your users.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24433

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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TutsPlus.com: Building Your Startup With PHP: Simplifying Onramp With OAuth

TutsPlus.com: Building Your Startup With PHP: Simplifying Onramp With OAuth

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next part of their "Build Your Startup with PHP" series today. This time they show you how to make it even easier for the users of your site to sign up using OAuth and third-party authentication.

In this tutorial, I’ll guide you through implementing OAuth integration with common social networks to make signing up and repeated usage easier and more efficient. I’ll explore Facebook, Google, Twitter and LinkedIn, the networks I see as being most appropriate to Meeting Planner’s target users.

The tutorial makes use of the Yii framework’s own AuthClient functionality to make the actual requests to the 3rd party services. They help you get it installed via Composer and the configuration changes you’ll need to make for it to be available and functional.

The tutorial then shows how to create developer applications on a few different services: Twitter, Facebook, Google and LinkedIn. They help you update your configuration with the secret keys for each and create a new database update for storing the 3rd party identifiers when the connection is made. Finally they hook it into the user profile and the login page for use by your users.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24433

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

TutsPlus.com: Building Your Startup With PHP: Simplifying Onramp With OAuth

TutsPlus.com: Building Your Startup With PHP: Simplifying Onramp With OAuth

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next part of their "Build Your Startup with PHP" series today. This time they show you how to make it even easier for the users of your site to sign up using OAuth and third-party authentication.

In this tutorial, I’ll guide you through implementing OAuth integration with common social networks to make signing up and repeated usage easier and more efficient. I’ll explore Facebook, Google, Twitter and LinkedIn, the networks I see as being most appropriate to Meeting Planner’s target users.

The tutorial makes use of the Yii framework’s own AuthClient functionality to make the actual requests to the 3rd party services. They help you get it installed via Composer and the configuration changes you’ll need to make for it to be available and functional.

The tutorial then shows how to create developer applications on a few different services: Twitter, Facebook, Google and LinkedIn. They help you update your configuration with the secret keys for each and create a new database update for storing the 3rd party identifiers when the connection is made. Finally they hook it into the user profile and the login page for use by your users.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24433

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

TutsPlus.com: Building Your Startup With PHP: Simplifying Onramp With OAuth

TutsPlus.com: Building Your Startup With PHP: Simplifying Onramp With OAuth

The TutsPlus.com site has posted the next part of their "Build Your Startup with PHP" series today. This time they show you how to make it even easier for the users of your site to sign up using OAuth and third-party authentication.

In this tutorial, I’ll guide you through implementing OAuth integration with common social networks to make signing up and repeated usage easier and more efficient. I’ll explore Facebook, Google, Twitter and LinkedIn, the networks I see as being most appropriate to Meeting Planner’s target users.

The tutorial makes use of the Yii framework’s own AuthClient functionality to make the actual requests to the 3rd party services. They help you get it installed via Composer and the configuration changes you’ll need to make for it to be available and functional.

The tutorial then shows how to create developer applications on a few different services: Twitter, Facebook, Google and LinkedIn. They help you update your configuration with the secret keys for each and create a new database update for storing the 3rd party identifiers when the connection is made. Finally they hook it into the user profile and the login page for use by your users.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24433

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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SitePoint PHP Blog: PHP-FIG Alternatives: The Pros and Cons of Various Visions

SitePoint PHP Blog: PHP-FIG Alternatives: The Pros and Cons of Various Visions

On the SitePoint PHP blog paul Jones has written up some of his own perspective on the PHP-FIG and the work that’s currently being done by the group on restructuring to make the group more effective, learning from past issues.

In his article The Past, Present and Future of the PHP-FIG, Larry Garfield gives a whirlwind tour of his impressions of the FIG, from its founding to one of its possible futures. I encourage you to read it in its entirety before continuing.

Herein, I will attempt to address some of the errors and omissions in Larry’s article, and offer two other possible futures for the FIG.

He starts by talking about the largest change the group is working on – the PHP-FIG 3.0 proposal. He compares the vision of this effort to some of the founding goals and principles of the group as documented in various emails and posts from current (and past) members of the group. Paul also talks about the FIG 2.0 workflow, what PSRs were before/after it was introduced and some of the overall impact that these and other PSRs from the group have had on the wider community.

He wraps up the post with a look at two alternatives he’s proposing for the group’s consideration as a way forward and an alternative to the PHP-FIG v3: independent interop groups and disbanding the PHP-FIG all together.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24432

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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SitePoint PHP Blog: PHP-FIG Alternatives: The Pros and Cons of Various Visions

SitePoint PHP Blog: PHP-FIG Alternatives: The Pros and Cons of Various Visions

On the SitePoint PHP blog paul Jones has written up some of his own perspective on the PHP-FIG and the work that’s currently being done by the group on restructuring to make the group more effective, learning from past issues.

In his article The Past, Present and Future of the PHP-FIG, Larry Garfield gives a whirlwind tour of his impressions of the FIG, from its founding to one of its possible futures. I encourage you to read it in its entirety before continuing.

Herein, I will attempt to address some of the errors and omissions in Larry’s article, and offer two other possible futures for the FIG.

He starts by talking about the largest change the group is working on – the PHP-FIG 3.0 proposal. He compares the vision of this effort to some of the founding goals and principles of the group as documented in various emails and posts from current (and past) members of the group. Paul also talks about the FIG 2.0 workflow, what PSRs were before/after it was introduced and some of the overall impact that these and other PSRs from the group have had on the wider community.

He wraps up the post with a look at two alternatives he’s proposing for the group’s consideration as a way forward and an alternative to the PHP-FIG v3: independent interop groups and disbanding the PHP-FIG all together.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24432

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>