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Archive for Wrzesień, 2016

Reddit.com: How is everyone doing development locally today?

Reddit.com: How is everyone doing development locally today?

On the /r/php subreddit from Reddit.com there’s a post from Spvrtan asking the community what technologies they’re using for local development in their day to day development work.

It’s honestly been over 5 years since I last touched PHP on the back-end. At that time, other than “doing it live”, XAMPP was the top dog for local environments. Is there a new player in the space or should I go with the same? I’ve been working primarily as a front-end engineer for the past few years during my full-time employment roles and touched the back-end on projects I’ve worked on but they’ve all been Java-based.

They also ask what other developers are using for their deployment tools and pipelines. Answers to the post so far include some of the usual tools and methods including:

  • Docker
  • puphpet (for use with Vagrant)
  • Homestead from Laravel

Other comments also mention the manual creation of virtual machines and even support for local installations rather than virtual ones. What’s your development environment like? Head over to the topic and share your own setup too.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24438

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Reddit.com: How is everyone doing development locally today?

Reddit.com: How is everyone doing development locally today?

On the /r/php subreddit from Reddit.com there’s a post from Spvrtan asking the community what technologies they’re using for local development in their day to day development work.

It’s honestly been over 5 years since I last touched PHP on the back-end. At that time, other than “doing it live”, XAMPP was the top dog for local environments. Is there a new player in the space or should I go with the same? I’ve been working primarily as a front-end engineer for the past few years during my full-time employment roles and touched the back-end on projects I’ve worked on but they’ve all been Java-based.

They also ask what other developers are using for their deployment tools and pipelines. Answers to the post so far include some of the usual tools and methods including:

  • Docker
  • puphpet (for use with Vagrant)
  • Homestead from Laravel

Other comments also mention the manual creation of virtual machines and even support for local installations rather than virtual ones. What’s your development environment like? Head over to the topic and share your own setup too.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24438

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Remi Collet: Microsoft SQL Server from PHP

Remi Collet: Microsoft SQL Server from PHP

In this recent post to his site Remi Collet shows you how to set up your PHP installation to allow it to work with a Microsoft SQL Server as it’s data store.

Here is a small comparison of the various solutions to use a [Microsoft SQL Server](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_SQL_Server) database from PHP, on Linux. All the tests have be run on Fedora 23 but should work on RHEL or CentOS version 7.

Several different extensions were tested as a part of making the connection to the SQL server:

  • Using PDO, ODBC and FreeTDS
  • Using PDO, mssql and FreeTDS
  • Using PDO, ODBC and Microsoft® ODBC Driver
  • Using the Microsoft® Driver
  • Using PDO and the Microsoft® Driver

Each item comes with a list of the requirements involved (other modules/extensions), examples of the configuration changes you’ll need to make and some sample code to create the connection.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24437

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Remi Collet: Microsoft SQL Server from PHP

Remi Collet: Microsoft SQL Server from PHP

In this recent post to his site Remi Collet shows you how to set up your PHP installation to allow it to work with a Microsoft SQL Server as it’s data store.

Here is a small comparison of the various solutions to use a [Microsoft SQL Server](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_SQL_Server) database from PHP, on Linux. All the tests have be run on Fedora 23 but should work on RHEL or CentOS version 7.

Several different extensions were tested as a part of making the connection to the SQL server:

  • Using PDO, ODBC and FreeTDS
  • Using PDO, mssql and FreeTDS
  • Using PDO, ODBC and Microsoft® ODBC Driver
  • Using the Microsoft® Driver
  • Using PDO and the Microsoft® Driver

Each item comes with a list of the requirements involved (other modules/extensions), examples of the configuration changes you’ll need to make and some sample code to create the connection.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24437

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Remi Collet: Microsoft SQL Server from PHP

Remi Collet: Microsoft SQL Server from PHP

In this recent post to his site Remi Collet shows you how to set up your PHP installation to allow it to work with a Microsoft SQL Server as it’s data store.

Here is a small comparison of the various solutions to use a [Microsoft SQL Server](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_SQL_Server) database from PHP, on Linux. All the tests have be run on Fedora 23 but should work on RHEL or CentOS version 7.

Several different extensions were tested as a part of making the connection to the SQL server:

  • Using PDO, ODBC and FreeTDS
  • Using PDO, mssql and FreeTDS
  • Using PDO, ODBC and Microsoft® ODBC Driver
  • Using the Microsoft® Driver
  • Using PDO and the Microsoft® Driver

Each item comes with a list of the requirements involved (other modules/extensions), examples of the configuration changes you’ll need to make and some sample code to create the connection.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24437

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Remi Collet: Microsoft SQL Server from PHP

Remi Collet: Microsoft SQL Server from PHP

In this recent post to his site Remi Collet shows you how to set up your PHP installation to allow it to work with a Microsoft SQL Server as it’s data store.

Here is a small comparison of the various solutions to use a [Microsoft SQL Server](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_SQL_Server) database from PHP, on Linux. All the tests have be run on Fedora 23 but should work on RHEL or CentOS version 7.

Several different extensions were tested as a part of making the connection to the SQL server:

  • Using PDO, ODBC and FreeTDS
  • Using PDO, mssql and FreeTDS
  • Using PDO, ODBC and Microsoft® ODBC Driver
  • Using the Microsoft® Driver
  • Using PDO and the Microsoft® Driver

Each item comes with a list of the requirements involved (other modules/extensions), examples of the configuration changes you’ll need to make and some sample code to create the connection.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24437

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

TutsPlus.com: Building a Welcome Page for Your WordPress Product: Code Part 1

TutsPlus.com: Building a Welcome Page for Your WordPress Product: Code Part 1

TutsPlus.com has started off a new series of posts for the WordPress users out there showing you how to build a "welcome page" for your WordPress site and product.

In the first two articles of this series, I wrote about what welcome pages are and how they are helping products improve user experience by connecting the dots, after which I wrote about the WordPress Transients API that I intend to use while building the welcome page.

Coding a welcome page for your WordPress plugin can be a tricky process. The entire concept revolves around redirecting users to a particular page via setting transients and finally deleting them. Let’s start building the welcome page.

They walk you through the creation of a simple plugin that can be used to easily create (and re-create) these "welcome" pages (the final result is here for the impatient). The tutorial the starts off by defining the architecture of the plugin and the workflow that it will follow to generate the page. From there it gets into the code for the plugin itself and related supporting files including the "initializer" that activates the plugin, making it ready for use.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24436

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

TutsPlus.com: Building a Welcome Page for Your WordPress Product: Code Part 1

TutsPlus.com: Building a Welcome Page for Your WordPress Product: Code Part 1

TutsPlus.com has started off a new series of posts for the WordPress users out there showing you how to build a "welcome page" for your WordPress site and product.

In the first two articles of this series, I wrote about what welcome pages are and how they are helping products improve user experience by connecting the dots, after which I wrote about the WordPress Transients API that I intend to use while building the welcome page.

Coding a welcome page for your WordPress plugin can be a tricky process. The entire concept revolves around redirecting users to a particular page via setting transients and finally deleting them. Let’s start building the welcome page.

They walk you through the creation of a simple plugin that can be used to easily create (and re-create) these "welcome" pages (the final result is here for the impatient). The tutorial the starts off by defining the architecture of the plugin and the workflow that it will follow to generate the page. From there it gets into the code for the plugin itself and related supporting files including the "initializer" that activates the plugin, making it ready for use.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24436

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Toptal.com: How Much Coding Should Designers Know?

Toptal.com: How Much Coding Should Designers Know?

The Toptal.com site has an interesting post mostly relevant to those out there that straddle the line between design and development. It wonders how much coding should a designer know to get the job done.

Many designers think each discipline should mind their own business, while others see no problem in professionals wearing multiple hats. Many developers see designers who code as a threat, while others see it as a facilitator. This is a hotly debated subject, and although I think some great designers are also superb at coding, I will always defend that the more you focus on a particular area the best you will be at it. But this shouldn’t be a reason for you to miss out on the benefits of having another skill under your belt.

The article then breaks down the benefits of designers learning to code by levels of knowledge:

  • Step 1: Know the basics of HTML and CSS
  • Step 2: Front-end JavaScript and AJAX could make you a unique asset
  • Step 3: Back-end JavaScript might be overkill
  • Step 4: Database Architecture and Software Engineering Won’t Get Designers Anywhere

For each point there’s a brief explanation of the level of knowledge it represents and what he sees as a general designers attitude towards it.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24435

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Toptal.com: How Much Coding Should Designers Know?

Toptal.com: How Much Coding Should Designers Know?

The Toptal.com site has an interesting post mostly relevant to those out there that straddle the line between design and development. It wonders how much coding should a designer know to get the job done.

Many designers think each discipline should mind their own business, while others see no problem in professionals wearing multiple hats. Many developers see designers who code as a threat, while others see it as a facilitator. This is a hotly debated subject, and although I think some great designers are also superb at coding, I will always defend that the more you focus on a particular area the best you will be at it. But this shouldn’t be a reason for you to miss out on the benefits of having another skill under your belt.

The article then breaks down the benefits of designers learning to code by levels of knowledge:

  • Step 1: Know the basics of HTML and CSS
  • Step 2: Front-end JavaScript and AJAX could make you a unique asset
  • Step 3: Back-end JavaScript might be overkill
  • Step 4: Database Architecture and Software Engineering Won’t Get Designers Anywhere

For each point there’s a brief explanation of the level of knowledge it represents and what he sees as a general designers attitude towards it.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24435

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>