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Archive for Lipiec, 2016

Symfony Blog: Introducing the new Symfony Documentation

Symfony Blog: Introducing the new Symfony Documentation

On the Symfony blog there’s a new post introducing the new project documentation, the result of lots of work from a large number of developers to bring the framework’s documentation up to date.

When the Symfony documentation was started more than 5 years ago, it was just a few short articles written by Fabien. Now, we boast more than 1,000 pages of documentation, a team of 4 maintainers and over 1,000 contributors!

As the project grew, we’ve tried to innovate: adding continuous integration to catch build errors, setup Platform.sh to auto-deploy every pull request and implemented a process so that all new features to Symfony’s core become documented (an amazingly rare feat).

And just like with code, a project must challenge itself continuously to stay ahead of the curve. In this article, we’re thrilled to introduce the new Symfony Documentation: a result of over 150 hours of volunteer work via a secret project codenamed "Project Mercury".

They talk about some of the challenges they faced with the previous version of the documentation and some of the problems they wanted to solve. Instead of splitting things up into three sections ("Book", "Cookbook" and "Components") they opted to break it up into something more approachable for two different categories of users: "Getting Started" and "Guides" (everything else). They share some about how they made this new version happen and the workflow they followed to keep everything (and everyone) in sync.

You can check out this new documentation over on the completely revamped documentation site right now.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24249

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Symfony Blog: Introducing the new Symfony Documentation

Symfony Blog: Introducing the new Symfony Documentation

On the Symfony blog there’s a new post introducing the new project documentation, the result of lots of work from a large number of developers to bring the framework’s documentation up to date.

When the Symfony documentation was started more than 5 years ago, it was just a few short articles written by Fabien. Now, we boast more than 1,000 pages of documentation, a team of 4 maintainers and over 1,000 contributors!

As the project grew, we’ve tried to innovate: adding continuous integration to catch build errors, setup Platform.sh to auto-deploy every pull request and implemented a process so that all new features to Symfony’s core become documented (an amazingly rare feat).

And just like with code, a project must challenge itself continuously to stay ahead of the curve. In this article, we’re thrilled to introduce the new Symfony Documentation: a result of over 150 hours of volunteer work via a secret project codenamed "Project Mercury".

They talk about some of the challenges they faced with the previous version of the documentation and some of the problems they wanted to solve. Instead of splitting things up into three sections ("Book", "Cookbook" and "Components") they opted to break it up into something more approachable for two different categories of users: "Getting Started" and "Guides" (everything else). They share some about how they made this new version happen and the workflow they followed to keep everything (and everyone) in sync.

You can check out this new documentation over on the completely revamped documentation site right now.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24249

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Symfony Blog: Introducing the new Symfony Documentation

Symfony Blog: Introducing the new Symfony Documentation

On the Symfony blog there’s a new post introducing the new project documentation, the result of lots of work from a large number of developers to bring the framework’s documentation up to date.

When the Symfony documentation was started more than 5 years ago, it was just a few short articles written by Fabien. Now, we boast more than 1,000 pages of documentation, a team of 4 maintainers and over 1,000 contributors!

As the project grew, we’ve tried to innovate: adding continuous integration to catch build errors, setup Platform.sh to auto-deploy every pull request and implemented a process so that all new features to Symfony’s core become documented (an amazingly rare feat).

And just like with code, a project must challenge itself continuously to stay ahead of the curve. In this article, we’re thrilled to introduce the new Symfony Documentation: a result of over 150 hours of volunteer work via a secret project codenamed "Project Mercury".

They talk about some of the challenges they faced with the previous version of the documentation and some of the problems they wanted to solve. Instead of splitting things up into three sections ("Book", "Cookbook" and "Components") they opted to break it up into something more approachable for two different categories of users: "Getting Started" and "Guides" (everything else). They share some about how they made this new version happen and the workflow they followed to keep everything (and everyone) in sync.

You can check out this new documentation over on the completely revamped documentation site right now.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24249

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Symfony Blog: Introducing the new Symfony Documentation

Symfony Blog: Introducing the new Symfony Documentation

On the Symfony blog there’s a new post introducing the new project documentation, the result of lots of work from a large number of developers to bring the framework’s documentation up to date.

When the Symfony documentation was started more than 5 years ago, it was just a few short articles written by Fabien. Now, we boast more than 1,000 pages of documentation, a team of 4 maintainers and over 1,000 contributors!

As the project grew, we’ve tried to innovate: adding continuous integration to catch build errors, setup Platform.sh to auto-deploy every pull request and implemented a process so that all new features to Symfony’s core become documented (an amazingly rare feat).

And just like with code, a project must challenge itself continuously to stay ahead of the curve. In this article, we’re thrilled to introduce the new Symfony Documentation: a result of over 150 hours of volunteer work via a secret project codenamed "Project Mercury".

They talk about some of the challenges they faced with the previous version of the documentation and some of the problems they wanted to solve. Instead of splitting things up into three sections ("Book", "Cookbook" and "Components") they opted to break it up into something more approachable for two different categories of users: "Getting Started" and "Guides" (everything else). They share some about how they made this new version happen and the workflow they followed to keep everything (and everyone) in sync.

You can check out this new documentation over on the completely revamped documentation site right now.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24249

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

CloudWays Blog: Josh Lockhart Discusses Slim Framework And Photography

CloudWays Blog: Josh Lockhart Discusses Slim Framework And Photography

The Cloudways blog has posted their latest interview with a member of the PHP community that has made major contributions. This time they talk with Josh Lockhart, the creator of the popular Slim framework and contributor to the PHP: The Right Way guide.

Josh Lockhart is the creator of Slim Micro Framework for PHP, a well known framework for writing powerful API and web apps. He is also managing PHP The Right Way, a project that provides best practices and quality information about PHP in one place. He works as a senior web developer and special project director at New Media Campaigns.

In this interview Josh talks about his experience with PHP. He also describes how he came up with the Slim Framework and offers great advice to PHP newbies.

In the interview Josh answers questions about:

  • his own history and experience in PHP development
  • how he sees PHP has progressed over the years (and where it’s heading)
  • why he created the Slim framework and what makes it different
  • the tools/software he uses to do his work

He also shares some recommendations to beginners with the language and suggests some software for those looking at things like content management systems. The interview finishes up with Josh sharing some about his own passion for photography and his own work environment.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24248

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

CloudWays Blog: Josh Lockhart Discusses Slim Framework And Photography

CloudWays Blog: Josh Lockhart Discusses Slim Framework And Photography

The Cloudways blog has posted their latest interview with a member of the PHP community that has made major contributions. This time they talk with Josh Lockhart, the creator of the popular Slim framework and contributor to the PHP: The Right Way guide.

Josh Lockhart is the creator of Slim Micro Framework for PHP, a well known framework for writing powerful API and web apps. He is also managing PHP The Right Way, a project that provides best practices and quality information about PHP in one place. He works as a senior web developer and special project director at New Media Campaigns.

In this interview Josh talks about his experience with PHP. He also describes how he came up with the Slim Framework and offers great advice to PHP newbies.

In the interview Josh answers questions about:

  • his own history and experience in PHP development
  • how he sees PHP has progressed over the years (and where it’s heading)
  • why he created the Slim framework and what makes it different
  • the tools/software he uses to do his work

He also shares some recommendations to beginners with the language and suggests some software for those looking at things like content management systems. The interview finishes up with Josh sharing some about his own passion for photography and his own work environment.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24248

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Chris Tankersley: My Docker Setup

Chris Tankersley: My Docker Setup

Docker has quickly become one of the tools that have helped make difficult environment setup and thing of the past. Chris Tankersley, a PHP developer and devops practitioner, has shared some about his own PHP Docker workflow in a new post to his site.

When it comes to Docker, I use Docker Compose to set up and link all of my containers together. It’s rare that I have a single container, though many of my Sculpin-based sites live quite comfortably inside of an nginx container, but even those take advantage of volumes.

For his standard three-tier setup he defines a basic docker-compose.yml configuration file with required services (nginx, PHP server, MySQL and Composer), local volume information and the links between them. With that working he uses another script to set up some PHP extensions and Composer as a service (making it a service provides isolation). He also includes the scripts he’s written up to help run a few extra commands and execute the Composer and PHP commands much easier. He wraps the post up talking about how all of this fits into his overall workflow and how it relates to the deployment of the application into other environments.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24247

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Chris Tankersley: My Docker Setup

Chris Tankersley: My Docker Setup

Docker has quickly become one of the tools that have helped make difficult environment setup and thing of the past. Chris Tankersley, a PHP developer and devops practitioner, has shared some about his own PHP Docker workflow in a new post to his site.

When it comes to Docker, I use Docker Compose to set up and link all of my containers together. It’s rare that I have a single container, though many of my Sculpin-based sites live quite comfortably inside of an nginx container, but even those take advantage of volumes.

For his standard three-tier setup he defines a basic docker-compose.yml configuration file with required services (nginx, PHP server, MySQL and Composer), local volume information and the links between them. With that working he uses another script to set up some PHP extensions and Composer as a service (making it a service provides isolation). He also includes the scripts he’s written up to help run a few extra commands and execute the Composer and PHP commands much easier. He wraps the post up talking about how all of this fits into his overall workflow and how it relates to the deployment of the application into other environments.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24247

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Chris Tankersley: My Docker Setup

Chris Tankersley: My Docker Setup

Docker has quickly become one of the tools that have helped make difficult environment setup and thing of the past. Chris Tankersley, a PHP developer and devops practitioner, has shared some about his own PHP Docker workflow in a new post to his site.

When it comes to Docker, I use Docker Compose to set up and link all of my containers together. It’s rare that I have a single container, though many of my Sculpin-based sites live quite comfortably inside of an nginx container, but even those take advantage of volumes.

For his standard three-tier setup he defines a basic docker-compose.yml configuration file with required services (nginx, PHP server, MySQL and Composer), local volume information and the links between them. With that working he uses another script to set up some PHP extensions and Composer as a service (making it a service provides isolation). He also includes the scripts he’s written up to help run a few extra commands and execute the Composer and PHP commands much easier. He wraps the post up talking about how all of this fits into his overall workflow and how it relates to the deployment of the application into other environments.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24247

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Peter Steenbergen: How to use PHP solarium in a Laravel project

Peter Steenbergen: How to use PHP solarium in a Laravel project

In this post to his site Peter Steenbergen shows you how to integrate SOLR searching into your Laravel application via the PHP Solarium library.

This is my second blog in a series about SOLR with the PHP Solarium library. My first blog was about the usage of OR filters to create Multi-Select facets with SOLR. With this blog item I will show you how easy it is to implement the PHP Solarium library in the Laravel framework.

He starts off with a fresh Laravel install and configures it to connect to a local SOLR server (he assumes you already have one running at this point). The he installs the Solarium library through Composer and makes a new service provider to create the client and bind it to the dependency injection container (app). To test the connection he makes a basic controller with one endpoint and an injected version of the Solarium client. With this working, he introduces the code from his previous post allowing for multi-select facet searching to return matching results.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24246

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>