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Archive for Czerwiec, 2016

SitePoint Web Blog: Heroku Alternative: Deploy Apps with Dokku on DigitalOcean

SitePoint Web Blog: Heroku Alternative: Deploy Apps with Dokku on DigitalOcean

On the SitePoint Web blog there’s a new tutorial showing you how to deploy applications with Dokku on DigitalOcean in the same way that you might with Heroku.

When Heroku announced their (quite reasonable) new limits for free apps, I realized that I would have to find another source of hosting for all the small, low-traffic projects that I currently have running on Heroku. [...] Since I have such an unreasonable number of apps running on Heroku, I thought it was high time to try out Dokku. Dokku is a Heroku-like tool that allows you to deploy complex apps by simply pushing with Git.

They start with some of the differences between the Heroku setup and Dokku, mostly that Dokku uses Docker for the deployment and configuration. They then show you how to create a Dokku server on DigitalOcean: setting up the domain, making the application and deploying the app with a push and other datastore plugins.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24137

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
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PHP Town Hall: Episode 50: Low down on PSR-15

PHP Town Hall: Episode 50: Low down on PSR-15

The PHP Town Hall podcast has posted their latest episode (after a bit of hiatus) giving the low down on PSR-15, the proposed PHP-FIG standard for HTTP middleware.

n all star cast this episode, as Ben and Phil are joined by regular guest Anthony Ferrara – thinker of good ideas and long-time part-time side-line contributor to the PHP-FIG, Woody Gilk – one-speed rider & BDFL of Kohana, and Beau Simensen – author of a bunch of stuff including StackPHP.

Here we’re talking about some awesome stuff the PHP-FIG is working on: PSR-15 (HTTP Middleware). [...] We discuss all this, and the reason PSR-7 (HTTP Message) is not enough for the ecosystem to benefit from shareable middleware. [...] Woody provides a bit of the decision-making process in a very tricky aspect of the FIGs job, which is: should standards be built entirely to match existing implementations, or should standards try to improve on the learnings of the existing implementations to better them all as implementations change to support the standard. It’s all a bit chicken and egg, but a very worthy discussion to have.

You can catch this latest episode either through the in-page video player or directly on YouTube. If you enjoy the show, be sure to subscribe to their feed and get the latest as new shoes are released.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24136

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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PHP Town Hall: Episode 50: Low down on PSR-15

PHP Town Hall: Episode 50: Low down on PSR-15

The PHP Town Hall podcast has posted their latest episode (after a bit of hiatus) giving the low down on PSR-15, the proposed PHP-FIG standard for HTTP middleware.

n all star cast this episode, as Ben and Phil are joined by regular guest Anthony Ferrara – thinker of good ideas and long-time part-time side-line contributor to the PHP-FIG, Woody Gilk – one-speed rider & BDFL of Kohana, and Beau Simensen – author of a bunch of stuff including StackPHP.

Here we’re talking about some awesome stuff the PHP-FIG is working on: PSR-15 (HTTP Middleware). [...] We discuss all this, and the reason PSR-7 (HTTP Message) is not enough for the ecosystem to benefit from shareable middleware. [...] Woody provides a bit of the decision-making process in a very tricky aspect of the FIGs job, which is: should standards be built entirely to match existing implementations, or should standards try to improve on the learnings of the existing implementations to better them all as implementations change to support the standard. It’s all a bit chicken and egg, but a very worthy discussion to have.

You can catch this latest episode either through the in-page video player or directly on YouTube. If you enjoy the show, be sure to subscribe to their feed and get the latest as new shoes are released.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24136

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

PHP Town Hall: Episode 50: Low down on PSR-15

PHP Town Hall: Episode 50: Low down on PSR-15

The PHP Town Hall podcast has posted their latest episode (after a bit of hiatus) giving the low down on PSR-15, the proposed PHP-FIG standard for HTTP middleware.

n all star cast this episode, as Ben and Phil are joined by regular guest Anthony Ferrara – thinker of good ideas and long-time part-time side-line contributor to the PHP-FIG, Woody Gilk – one-speed rider & BDFL of Kohana, and Beau Simensen – author of a bunch of stuff including StackPHP.

Here we’re talking about some awesome stuff the PHP-FIG is working on: PSR-15 (HTTP Middleware). [...] We discuss all this, and the reason PSR-7 (HTTP Message) is not enough for the ecosystem to benefit from shareable middleware. [...] Woody provides a bit of the decision-making process in a very tricky aspect of the FIGs job, which is: should standards be built entirely to match existing implementations, or should standards try to improve on the learnings of the existing implementations to better them all as implementations change to support the standard. It’s all a bit chicken and egg, but a very worthy discussion to have.

You can catch this latest episode either through the in-page video player or directly on YouTube. If you enjoy the show, be sure to subscribe to their feed and get the latest as new shoes are released.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24136

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Community News: Recent posts from PHP Quickfix (06.29.2016)

Community News: Recent posts from PHP Quickfix (06.29.2016)

Recent posts from the PHP Quickfix site:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24139

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Community News: Recent posts from PHP Quickfix (06.29.2016)

Community News: Recent posts from PHP Quickfix (06.29.2016)

Recent posts from the PHP Quickfix site:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24139

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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SitePoint PHP Blog: Can Symfony Apps Be Fast on Vagrant? Let’s Check with SuluCMS!

SitePoint PHP Blog: Can Symfony Apps Be Fast on Vagrant? Let’s Check with SuluCMS!

On the SitePoint PHP blog they’ve posted a new tutorial looking at the combination of Symfony applications (well, one specific one) and Vagrant to optimize it for the best performance possible.

In this short tutorial, we’ll set up Sulu, a new Symfony based CMS, and optimize it on a Vagrant environment. Why a dedicated tutorial handling this? Besides the fact that Sulu has a rather complex initialization procedure, it is based on Symfony which is infamously slow on virtual machines with shared filesystems, and thus needs additional optimizations post-install. The performance hacks in this post, while Sulu-specific, can be applied to any Symfony application to make it faster on Vagrant.

The rest of the post walks you through the steps to get the box set up and the Sulu application up and running:

  • New Box and Folder Sharing
  • App Type and Vagrant Boot (configuration)
  • Installing Sulu

Then they get into the speed improvements and "hacks" to make the overall system perform better. They make updates to the log/cache directory fetching, moving the "vendors" folder into the VM (non-synced) and enabling the APC caching on autoloading. The tutorial also includes a few helpful troubleshooting tips of things to check if a problem does happen to pop up.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24135

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

SitePoint PHP Blog: Can Symfony Apps Be Fast on Vagrant? Let’s Check with SuluCMS!

SitePoint PHP Blog: Can Symfony Apps Be Fast on Vagrant? Let’s Check with SuluCMS!

On the SitePoint PHP blog they’ve posted a new tutorial looking at the combination of Symfony applications (well, one specific one) and Vagrant to optimize it for the best performance possible.

In this short tutorial, we’ll set up Sulu, a new Symfony based CMS, and optimize it on a Vagrant environment. Why a dedicated tutorial handling this? Besides the fact that Sulu has a rather complex initialization procedure, it is based on Symfony which is infamously slow on virtual machines with shared filesystems, and thus needs additional optimizations post-install. The performance hacks in this post, while Sulu-specific, can be applied to any Symfony application to make it faster on Vagrant.

The rest of the post walks you through the steps to get the box set up and the Sulu application up and running:

  • New Box and Folder Sharing
  • App Type and Vagrant Boot (configuration)
  • Installing Sulu

Then they get into the speed improvements and "hacks" to make the overall system perform better. They make updates to the log/cache directory fetching, moving the "vendors" folder into the VM (non-synced) and enabling the APC caching on autoloading. The tutorial also includes a few helpful troubleshooting tips of things to check if a problem does happen to pop up.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24135

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

SitePoint PHP Blog: Can Symfony Apps Be Fast on Vagrant? Let’s Check with SuluCMS!

SitePoint PHP Blog: Can Symfony Apps Be Fast on Vagrant? Let’s Check with SuluCMS!

On the SitePoint PHP blog they’ve posted a new tutorial looking at the combination of Symfony applications (well, one specific one) and Vagrant to optimize it for the best performance possible.

In this short tutorial, we’ll set up Sulu, a new Symfony based CMS, and optimize it on a Vagrant environment. Why a dedicated tutorial handling this? Besides the fact that Sulu has a rather complex initialization procedure, it is based on Symfony which is infamously slow on virtual machines with shared filesystems, and thus needs additional optimizations post-install. The performance hacks in this post, while Sulu-specific, can be applied to any Symfony application to make it faster on Vagrant.

The rest of the post walks you through the steps to get the box set up and the Sulu application up and running:

  • New Box and Folder Sharing
  • App Type and Vagrant Boot (configuration)
  • Installing Sulu

Then they get into the speed improvements and "hacks" to make the overall system perform better. They make updates to the log/cache directory fetching, moving the "vendors" folder into the VM (non-synced) and enabling the APC caching on autoloading. The tutorial also includes a few helpful troubleshooting tips of things to check if a problem does happen to pop up.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24135

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

PHP.net: PHP 7.1.0 Alpha 2 Released

PHP.net: PHP 7.1.0 Alpha 2 Released

The PHP development group has officially released the latest alpha in the PHP 7.1.x series of releases. This is an alpha release and is not intended for production use.

The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.1.0 Alpha 2. This is the second alpha release for PHP 7.1.0. All users of PHP are encouraged to test this version carefully, and report any bugs and incompatibilities in the bug tracking system.

[...] For more information on the new features and other changes, you can read the NEWS file, or the UPGRADING file for a complete list of upgrading notes. These files can also be found in the release archive.

You can get this latest alpha release for testing on your own systems from the QA downloads page (for source) and the Windows QA site for the Windows binaries.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24134

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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