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Archive for Czerwiec, 2016

FreeCodeCamp.com: Bill Sourer – Finding Time to Become a Better Developer

FreeCodeCamp.com: Bill Sourer – Finding Time to Become a Better Developer

On the FreeCodeCamp Medium blog Bill Sourer shares some tips you can use to find time to become a better developer in the fast-based, sometimes crazy world of software development.

There’s no time for anything. At least that’s how it feels doesn’t it? No time to learn all the things you think you need to learn to stay ahead of the curve. No time to go back and refactor that ugly piece of code. It works (sort of) and there’s a deadline approaching. No time to write unit tests for everything. No time to write documentation or comments for the next guy who gets stuck maintaining what you wrote. No time to think. No time to breathe. No time!

Well… if you take the time to read this article, I promise you’ll find yourself with more time for what’s important.

He breaks it down into five main tips (here’s a tl;dr for those in a rush):

  • You don’t need to learn every new thing in order to stay relevant.
  • Writing good code takes less time than writing bad code, BUT it doesn’t feel that way.
  • Working 24/7 does NOT make you a hero. Managing expectations does.
  • Not all time spent “improving” code has the same ROI.
  • Scheduled down time makes you more productive.

Each item on the list has a paragraph or three explaining it in a bit more detail. There’s also some other interesting ideas and thoughts in the comments of the post from other readers.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24142

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

FreeCodeCamp.com: Bill Sourer – Finding Time to Become a Better Developer

FreeCodeCamp.com: Bill Sourer – Finding Time to Become a Better Developer

On the FreeCodeCamp Medium blog Bill Sourer shares some tips you can use to find time to become a better developer in the fast-based, sometimes crazy world of software development.

There’s no time for anything. At least that’s how it feels doesn’t it? No time to learn all the things you think you need to learn to stay ahead of the curve. No time to go back and refactor that ugly piece of code. It works (sort of) and there’s a deadline approaching. No time to write unit tests for everything. No time to write documentation or comments for the next guy who gets stuck maintaining what you wrote. No time to think. No time to breathe. No time!

Well… if you take the time to read this article, I promise you’ll find yourself with more time for what’s important.

He breaks it down into five main tips (here’s a tl;dr for those in a rush):

  • You don’t need to learn every new thing in order to stay relevant.
  • Writing good code takes less time than writing bad code, BUT it doesn’t feel that way.
  • Working 24/7 does NOT make you a hero. Managing expectations does.
  • Not all time spent “improving” code has the same ROI.
  • Scheduled down time makes you more productive.

Each item on the list has a paragraph or three explaining it in a bit more detail. There’s also some other interesting ideas and thoughts in the comments of the post from other readers.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24142

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

FreeCodeCamp.com: Bill Sourer – Finding Time to Become a Better Developer

FreeCodeCamp.com: Bill Sourer – Finding Time to Become a Better Developer

On the FreeCodeCamp Medium blog Bill Sourer shares some tips you can use to find time to become a better developer in the fast-based, sometimes crazy world of software development.

There’s no time for anything. At least that’s how it feels doesn’t it? No time to learn all the things you think you need to learn to stay ahead of the curve. No time to go back and refactor that ugly piece of code. It works (sort of) and there’s a deadline approaching. No time to write unit tests for everything. No time to write documentation or comments for the next guy who gets stuck maintaining what you wrote. No time to think. No time to breathe. No time!

Well… if you take the time to read this article, I promise you’ll find yourself with more time for what’s important.

He breaks it down into five main tips (here’s a tl;dr for those in a rush):

  • You don’t need to learn every new thing in order to stay relevant.
  • Writing good code takes less time than writing bad code, BUT it doesn’t feel that way.
  • Working 24/7 does NOT make you a hero. Managing expectations does.
  • Not all time spent “improving” code has the same ROI.
  • Scheduled down time makes you more productive.

Each item on the list has a paragraph or three explaining it in a bit more detail. There’s also some other interesting ideas and thoughts in the comments of the post from other readers.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24142

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

FreeCodeCamp.com: Bill Sourer – Finding Time to Become a Better Developer

FreeCodeCamp.com: Bill Sourer – Finding Time to Become a Better Developer

On the FreeCodeCamp Medium blog Bill Sourer shares some tips you can use to find time to become a better developer in the fast-based, sometimes crazy world of software development.

There’s no time for anything. At least that’s how it feels doesn’t it? No time to learn all the things you think you need to learn to stay ahead of the curve. No time to go back and refactor that ugly piece of code. It works (sort of) and there’s a deadline approaching. No time to write unit tests for everything. No time to write documentation or comments for the next guy who gets stuck maintaining what you wrote. No time to think. No time to breathe. No time!

Well… if you take the time to read this article, I promise you’ll find yourself with more time for what’s important.

He breaks it down into five main tips (here’s a tl;dr for those in a rush):

  • You don’t need to learn every new thing in order to stay relevant.
  • Writing good code takes less time than writing bad code, BUT it doesn’t feel that way.
  • Working 24/7 does NOT make you a hero. Managing expectations does.
  • Not all time spent “improving” code has the same ROI.
  • Scheduled down time makes you more productive.

Each item on the list has a paragraph or three explaining it in a bit more detail. There’s also some other interesting ideas and thoughts in the comments of the post from other readers.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24142

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Freek Van der Herten: A package to log activity in a Laravel app

Freek Van der Herten: A package to log activity in a Laravel app

In a new post to his site Freek Van der Herten shares information about a logging package they’ve developed for Laravel-based applications to make activity logging simpler throughout the app: laravel-activitylog.

n your apps there’s probably a lot going on. Users log in and out, they create, update and delete content, mails get sent and so on. For an administrator of an app these events provide useful insights. In almost every project we make at Spatie we log these events and show them in the admin-section of our site. [...] We made a new package called laravel-activitylog that makes logging activities in a Laravel app a cinch. In this blogpost I’d like to walk you through it.

He then goes through the basics of using the library, complete with code examples:

  • simple activity logging with messaging
  • providing the "acted on" object information
  • logging the information about who the actor was

There’s also a section with details on automatic model logging, making it easier to see the changes on you data without having to log each one individually. He also shows you how to use multiple logs, providing a method to narrow down log records by type.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24141

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Freek Van der Herten: A package to log activity in a Laravel app

Freek Van der Herten: A package to log activity in a Laravel app

In a new post to his site Freek Van der Herten shares information about a logging package they’ve developed for Laravel-based applications to make activity logging simpler throughout the app: laravel-activitylog.

n your apps there’s probably a lot going on. Users log in and out, they create, update and delete content, mails get sent and so on. For an administrator of an app these events provide useful insights. In almost every project we make at Spatie we log these events and show them in the admin-section of our site. [...] We made a new package called laravel-activitylog that makes logging activities in a Laravel app a cinch. In this blogpost I’d like to walk you through it.

He then goes through the basics of using the library, complete with code examples:

  • simple activity logging with messaging
  • providing the "acted on" object information
  • logging the information about who the actor was

There’s also a section with details on automatic model logging, making it easier to see the changes on you data without having to log each one individually. He also shows you how to use multiple logs, providing a method to narrow down log records by type.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24141

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHP (06.30.2016)

Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHP (06.30.2016)

Here’s what was popular in the PHP community one year ago today:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24140

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHP (06.30.2016)

Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHP (06.30.2016)

Here’s what was popular in the PHP community one year ago today:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24140

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHP (06.30.2016)

Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHP (06.30.2016)

Here’s what was popular in the PHP community one year ago today:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24140

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Zend Framework Blog: Zend Framework 3 Released!

Zend Framework Blog: Zend Framework 3 Released!

On the Zend Framework blog they’ve posted an announcement about the release of the latest version of their framework, the Zend Framework v3.

After 17 months of effort, hundreds of releases, tens of thousands of commits by hundreds of contributors, and millions of installs, we’re pleased to announce the immediate availability of Zend Framework 3.

[...] For Zend Framework 2 MVC users, the differences are subtle. [...] Migration from version 2 to version 3 was at the top of our minds, and we have provided a number of forwards compatibility features over the course of ZF3 development, and written migration guides to help you navigate the changes.

They also mention updates to the skeleton application for this latest release including the work they’ve done to make the framework and its components more isolated and have fewer dependencies.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/24138

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>