Jeśli jesteś właścicielem tej strony, możesz wyłączyć reklamę poniżej zmieniając pakiet na PRO lub VIP w panelu naszego hostingu już od 4zł!

Archive for Kwiecień, 2016

Viva64.com: Analysis of PHP7

Viva64.com: Analysis of PHP7

On the Viva64.com site they’ve posted the results of their own evaluation of PHP 7 in terms of both the source of the language itself and the libraries it makes use of.

Sometimes checking a project one more time can be quite amusing. It helps to see which errors were fixed, and which ones got into the code since the time it was last checked. My colleague has already written an article about PHP analysis. As there was a new version released, I decided to check the source code of the interpreter once again, and I wasn’t disappointed – the project had a lot of interesting fragments to look at.

They start with a brief look at PHP 7 including when it was released, some of the features/functionality included and the tool they used to do the analysis. They talk about some of the difficulties in the analysis process and how the widespread user of macros tripped it up a bit. They includes some code examples from PHP’s source and the warnings that their PVS-Studio returned. The post ends with a brief look at the third-party libraries PHP uses and the responsibility the project takes in including them.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23948

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Viva64.com: Analysis of PHP7

Viva64.com: Analysis of PHP7

On the Viva64.com site they’ve posted the results of their own evaluation of PHP 7 in terms of both the source of the language itself and the libraries it makes use of.

Sometimes checking a project one more time can be quite amusing. It helps to see which errors were fixed, and which ones got into the code since the time it was last checked. My colleague has already written an article about PHP analysis. As there was a new version released, I decided to check the source code of the interpreter once again, and I wasn’t disappointed – the project had a lot of interesting fragments to look at.

They start with a brief look at PHP 7 including when it was released, some of the features/functionality included and the tool they used to do the analysis. They talk about some of the difficulties in the analysis process and how the widespread user of macros tripped it up a bit. They includes some code examples from PHP’s source and the warnings that their PVS-Studio returned. The post ends with a brief look at the third-party libraries PHP uses and the responsibility the project takes in including them.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23948

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

TutsPlus.com: How to Authenticate Users With Twitter OAuth 2.0

TutsPlus.com: How to Authenticate Users With Twitter OAuth 2.0

On the TutsPlus.com site they’ve posted a tutorial showing you how to integrate with Twitter’s OAuth authentication through a few simple steps allowing the well known "Log in with Twitter" functionality.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to use Twitter API 1.1 and OAuth 2.0 to authenticate users of your application and publish a test tweet.

To create services which act on behalf of users’ accounts and make it really secure and easy to develop, we need three things: a Twitter application, the REST API and access to the user account To put the pieces together into a working mechanism, we need an authentication framework. As a Twitter standard, the REST API identifies Twitter applications and users using OAuth.

The tutorial starts with a brief description of OAuth for those that aren’t overly familiar with the use of the technology and its flow. They then go through the steps you’ll need to get your app working with Twitter’s OAuth handling:

  • Create the Twitter application
  • Get the OAuth credentials (secret and key)
  • Installing a Twitter library via Composer
  • Configuring your app with the OAuth credentials
  • Building out the code to send the request to Twitter and receive the resulting callback

Once you receive that callback you’ll have a token you can use to uniquely identify the user and interact with the Twitter API on their behalf. The post ends with some related links to other resources with more details about the Twitter API, their OAuth handling and other Twitter libraries.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23947

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

TutsPlus.com: How to Authenticate Users With Twitter OAuth 2.0

TutsPlus.com: How to Authenticate Users With Twitter OAuth 2.0

On the TutsPlus.com site they’ve posted a tutorial showing you how to integrate with Twitter’s OAuth authentication through a few simple steps allowing the well known "Log in with Twitter" functionality.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to use Twitter API 1.1 and OAuth 2.0 to authenticate users of your application and publish a test tweet.

To create services which act on behalf of users’ accounts and make it really secure and easy to develop, we need three things: a Twitter application, the REST API and access to the user account To put the pieces together into a working mechanism, we need an authentication framework. As a Twitter standard, the REST API identifies Twitter applications and users using OAuth.

The tutorial starts with a brief description of OAuth for those that aren’t overly familiar with the use of the technology and its flow. They then go through the steps you’ll need to get your app working with Twitter’s OAuth handling:

  • Create the Twitter application
  • Get the OAuth credentials (secret and key)
  • Installing a Twitter library via Composer
  • Configuring your app with the OAuth credentials
  • Building out the code to send the request to Twitter and receive the resulting callback

Once you receive that callback you’ll have a token you can use to uniquely identify the user and interact with the Twitter API on their behalf. The post ends with some related links to other resources with more details about the Twitter API, their OAuth handling and other Twitter libraries.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23947

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

TutsPlus.com: How to Authenticate Users With Twitter OAuth 2.0

TutsPlus.com: How to Authenticate Users With Twitter OAuth 2.0

On the TutsPlus.com site they’ve posted a tutorial showing you how to integrate with Twitter’s OAuth authentication through a few simple steps allowing the well known "Log in with Twitter" functionality.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to use Twitter API 1.1 and OAuth 2.0 to authenticate users of your application and publish a test tweet.

To create services which act on behalf of users’ accounts and make it really secure and easy to develop, we need three things: a Twitter application, the REST API and access to the user account To put the pieces together into a working mechanism, we need an authentication framework. As a Twitter standard, the REST API identifies Twitter applications and users using OAuth.

The tutorial starts with a brief description of OAuth for those that aren’t overly familiar with the use of the technology and its flow. They then go through the steps you’ll need to get your app working with Twitter’s OAuth handling:

  • Create the Twitter application
  • Get the OAuth credentials (secret and key)
  • Installing a Twitter library via Composer
  • Configuring your app with the OAuth credentials
  • Building out the code to send the request to Twitter and receive the resulting callback

Once you receive that callback you’ll have a token you can use to uniquely identify the user and interact with the Twitter API on their behalf. The post ends with some related links to other resources with more details about the Twitter API, their OAuth handling and other Twitter libraries.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23947

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

TutsPlus.com: How to Authenticate Users With Twitter OAuth 2.0

TutsPlus.com: How to Authenticate Users With Twitter OAuth 2.0

On the TutsPlus.com site they’ve posted a tutorial showing you how to integrate with Twitter’s OAuth authentication through a few simple steps allowing the well known "Log in with Twitter" functionality.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to use Twitter API 1.1 and OAuth 2.0 to authenticate users of your application and publish a test tweet.

To create services which act on behalf of users’ accounts and make it really secure and easy to develop, we need three things: a Twitter application, the REST API and access to the user account To put the pieces together into a working mechanism, we need an authentication framework. As a Twitter standard, the REST API identifies Twitter applications and users using OAuth.

The tutorial starts with a brief description of OAuth for those that aren’t overly familiar with the use of the technology and its flow. They then go through the steps you’ll need to get your app working with Twitter’s OAuth handling:

  • Create the Twitter application
  • Get the OAuth credentials (secret and key)
  • Installing a Twitter library via Composer
  • Configuring your app with the OAuth credentials
  • Building out the code to send the request to Twitter and receive the resulting callback

Once you receive that callback you’ll have a token you can use to uniquely identify the user and interact with the Twitter API on their behalf. The post ends with some related links to other resources with more details about the Twitter API, their OAuth handling and other Twitter libraries.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23947

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Symfony Blog: The New Symfony Documentation Search Engine

Symfony Blog: The New Symfony Documentation Search Engine

In an effort to improve their "developer experience" (DX) around using the Symfony framework the development team has introduced new searching functionality to help more effectively find what you’re looking for in the expansive Symfony documentation.

Symfony boasts one of the largest documentation pools ever written for an Open- Source project. Considering the ten different Symfony versions (from 2.0 to master) and including the code samples, Symfony Documentation has around 3.6 million words, more than three times the word count of the entire Harry Potter series.

They share some of the things they learned around creating a search engine ("it’s hard") and what they ultimately ended up using – the Algolia service. The post talks about how they indexed the current documentation and broke it up into "chunks" of meaningful content. They also include the simple Javascript they use that links the search field to the Algolia service and renders the results using a view partial.

The proof of concept for the new search engine was a success and we decided to stop the ElasticSearch integration and stick with Algolia. The new search engine is greatly faster than the previous one and the search results are more accurate and relevant.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23945

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Symfony Blog: The New Symfony Documentation Search Engine

Symfony Blog: The New Symfony Documentation Search Engine

In an effort to improve their "developer experience" (DX) around using the Symfony framework the development team has introduced new searching functionality to help more effectively find what you’re looking for in the expansive Symfony documentation.

Symfony boasts one of the largest documentation pools ever written for an Open- Source project. Considering the ten different Symfony versions (from 2.0 to master) and including the code samples, Symfony Documentation has around 3.6 million words, more than three times the word count of the entire Harry Potter series.

They share some of the things they learned around creating a search engine ("it’s hard") and what they ultimately ended up using – the Algolia service. The post talks about how they indexed the current documentation and broke it up into "chunks" of meaningful content. They also include the simple Javascript they use that links the search field to the Algolia service and renders the results using a view partial.

The proof of concept for the new search engine was a success and we decided to stop the ElasticSearch integration and stick with Algolia. The new search engine is greatly faster than the previous one and the search results are more accurate and relevant.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23945

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Scotch.io: How To Process Tweets in Real-Time with Laravel

Scotch.io: How To Process Tweets in Real-Time with Laravel

The Scotch.io site has a tutorial posted showing you how to combine Laravel and the Twitter Streaming API to process tweets in real time inside your application.

This tutorial will show how to use the Twitter Streaming APIs to process tweets in real-time from a Laravel application. There are a variety of use cases for this: perhaps you want to auto-respond to mentions of your company, run a contest via Twitter, or create support tickets when users complain about your product. For this tutorial, we’ll build a “featured tweets” widget to display approved tweets on our app’s home page.

He starts with an overview of the tools and terms you’ll need to know about for the tutorial and a few notes of things to watch out for. He then describes the overall structure of the application (an app just to show the tweets) and links to a repository for the impatient. He then breaks up the rest of the tutorial into several steps:

  • Creating a new Laravel application and installing the Phirehose library
  • Building a "process tweet" job and matching TwitterStream class to use Phirehose and dispatch the job
  • Make the artisan command to connect to the API and the application you created
  • Configure your queue driver and run the processing command
  • Set up a "Tweet" model to connect the application and database table

He finishes the post showing how to make the ProcessTweet Job useful, set up some basic authentication and pass the currently processed tweets into the default "Welcome" view.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23944

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Scotch.io: How To Process Tweets in Real-Time with Laravel

Scotch.io: How To Process Tweets in Real-Time with Laravel

The Scotch.io site has a tutorial posted showing you how to combine Laravel and the Twitter Streaming API to process tweets in real time inside your application.

This tutorial will show how to use the Twitter Streaming APIs to process tweets in real-time from a Laravel application. There are a variety of use cases for this: perhaps you want to auto-respond to mentions of your company, run a contest via Twitter, or create support tickets when users complain about your product. For this tutorial, we’ll build a “featured tweets” widget to display approved tweets on our app’s home page.

He starts with an overview of the tools and terms you’ll need to know about for the tutorial and a few notes of things to watch out for. He then describes the overall structure of the application (an app just to show the tweets) and links to a repository for the impatient. He then breaks up the rest of the tutorial into several steps:

  • Creating a new Laravel application and installing the Phirehose library
  • Building a "process tweet" job and matching TwitterStream class to use Phirehose and dispatch the job
  • Make the artisan command to connect to the API and the application you created
  • Configure your queue driver and run the processing command
  • Set up a "Tweet" model to connect the application and database table

He finishes the post showing how to make the ProcessTweet Job useful, set up some basic authentication and pass the currently processed tweets into the default "Welcome" view.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23944

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>