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Archive for Luty, 2016

ReadOrListen Podcast: Episode #14 – Diving Into a Laravel Audit

ReadOrListen Podcast: Episode #14 – Diving Into a Laravel Audit

The ReadOrListen podcast has posted their latest episode featuring the reading of a new article by Jesse Schutt about using Laravel Audit to evaluate the current state of a Laravel-based codebase (read by Jack Fruh).

Recently the Zaengle team was asked to look over an existing Laravel application and give a review of the overall state of the code. We were to act as an independent third party, between a new studio who had inherited the codebase, and the client, who was anticipating launching the product.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 of the show directly. You can also subscribe to their feed or follow them on Twitter/Facebook to get more information about new episodes as they’re released.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23704

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Laravel Podcast: Episode #42 – Shots Fired

Laravel Podcast: Episode #42 – Shots Fired

The Laravel Podcast, hosted by Matt Stauffer (with guest hosts Taylor Otwell and Jeffrey Way) has posted its latest episode – Episode #42: ActiveRecord & The School Of Zonda:

In this episode, the crew is joined by Adam Wathan to discuss ActiveRecord and the Eloquent ORM.

Lots of talk around ActiveRecord vs DataMapper and discussing the positives and negatives to each.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3. If you enjoy the show, be sure to subscribe to their feed or follow them on Twitter of the latest show updates.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23703

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Larry Garfield: Composer vs. Linux Distributions: A Mental Model Battle

Larry Garfield: Composer vs. Linux Distributions: A Mental Model Battle

In his latest post Larry Garfield talks about the Composer problem that was recently brought up by the Gentoo linux project and is related to how Composer packages and system-level shared libraries differ.

This is not a new complaint; Other distributions have complained about Composer’s impact before. But fundamentally I think the issue stems from having the wrong mental model of how modern PHP works when viewed from a distribution or sysadmin perspective.

In a recent heated GitHub thread, several people referred to PHP "linking" to 3rd party libraries, as if they were shared C libraries. That is simply not the case. Neither "static linking" nor "dynamic linking" really applies to PHP. From a sysadmin perspective, PHP is closer to highly complicated bash scripts than anything else.

Larry starts with a bit of history on the subject, pointing out the two methods most developers used PHP code: copy/pasted from the web or installed via PEAR. He talks about the common issues with both approaches. He then talks about how modern PHP development and Composer related and how, from a sysadmin perspective, Composer is the "compile" step of PHP and only supports static links. He also makes some suggestions to the distribution packagers around how to handle these system-level Composer dependencies (and how to treat it like a "binary" if needed).

The mistake here is trying to treat dependent packages of modern PHP applications like shared libraries. They’re not. The community has spoken, and PHP simply doesn’t work that way anymore. Fighting that is a losing battle. But by viewing composer as a compiler, distributions can still slot PHP into their typical workflows and get all of the security update ease that they’re looking for.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23702

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Thijs Feryn: Derick Rethans – MongoDB, Xdebug & PHP

Thijs Feryn: Derick Rethans – MongoDB, Xdebug & PHP

Thjis Feryn has posted another in his series of video interviews with members of the PHP community during his travels. In this new episode he talks with Derick Rethans of Xdebug and MongoDb.

Derick Rethans is my guest for this episode. The interview was recorded at PHPBenelux Conference 2016 in the community village.

[...] Derick is a well-known and well-respected member of the PHP community. He is primarily known as the author and maintainer of Xdebug, a debugging extension for PHP. He also developed the DateTime extension. He even wrote a book about it. Derick works for MongoDB where he works on the MongoDB extension and the separate library.

You can catch this episode either via the video (in-page or on YouTube) or for the more audio-inclined over on SoundCloud. Be sure to check out his other interviews while you’re at the site as well.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23690

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var d = new Date();
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Thijs Feryn: Derick Rethans – MongoDB, Xdebug & PHP

Thijs Feryn: Derick Rethans – MongoDB, Xdebug & PHP

Thjis Feryn has posted another in his series of video interviews with members of the PHP community during his travels. In this new episode he talks with Derick Rethans of Xdebug and MongoDb.

Derick Rethans is my guest for this episode. The interview was recorded at PHPBenelux Conference 2016 in the community village.

[...] Derick is a well-known and well-respected member of the PHP community. He is primarily known as the author and maintainer of Xdebug, a debugging extension for PHP. He also developed the DateTime extension. He even wrote a book about it. Derick works for MongoDB where he works on the MongoDB extension and the separate library.

You can catch this episode either via the video (in-page or on YouTube) or for the more audio-inclined over on SoundCloud. Be sure to check out his other interviews while you’re at the site as well.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23690

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
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SitePoint PHP Blog: How to Consume Laravel API with AngularJS

SitePoint PHP Blog: How to Consume Laravel API with AngularJS

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a new tutorial from author Francesco Malatesta that continues their series looking at combining AngularJS and PHP, more specifically Laravel, to create a basic application. In this part of series he builds on the server-side code created in part one and creates the Angular frontend.

In part 1, we built our server part. Now we can build our client. We are going to use AngularJS to make a Single Page Application. We will use a very basic bootstrap template, built on the fly.

The application is simple enough and will consist of three "screens" (not "pages" since it’s a single page application): a login, a signup and a main screen. He walks you through the setup of a standard frontend development environment including tools and software you’ll need to get started. He makes the simple route and Blade template for the single-page app and defines some AngularJS routes for each of the screens. He then includes the code to set up both the signup and login controllers and how to detect if the user is successfully logged in. From there he gets into the functional part of the application: managing the books and the user’s wishlist with the standard CRUD (create, read, update and delete) operations. Screenshots are also included at some spots so you can ensure your progress matches the tutorial.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23689

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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SitePoint PHP Blog: How to Consume Laravel API with AngularJS

SitePoint PHP Blog: How to Consume Laravel API with AngularJS

The SitePoint PHP blog has posted a new tutorial from author Francesco Malatesta that continues their series looking at combining AngularJS and PHP, more specifically Laravel, to create a basic application. In this part of series he builds on the server-side code created in part one and creates the Angular frontend.

In part 1, we built our server part. Now we can build our client. We are going to use AngularJS to make a Single Page Application. We will use a very basic bootstrap template, built on the fly.

The application is simple enough and will consist of three "screens" (not "pages" since it’s a single page application): a login, a signup and a main screen. He walks you through the setup of a standard frontend development environment including tools and software you’ll need to get started. He makes the simple route and Blade template for the single-page app and defines some AngularJS routes for each of the screens. He then includes the code to set up both the signup and login controllers and how to detect if the user is successfully logged in. From there he gets into the functional part of the application: managing the books and the user’s wishlist with the standard CRUD (create, read, update and delete) operations. Screenshots are also included at some spots so you can ensure your progress matches the tutorial.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23689

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Symfony Finland: Going Async in Symfony Controllers

Symfony Finland: Going Async in Symfony Controllers

On the Symfony Finland site Jani Tarvainen has posted a tutorial showing you how to create asynchronous controller handling in a Symfony-based application.

Asynchronous programming has become a synonym for high performance in server side web applications in the recent years. This is largely due to the rising popularity of JavaScript and Node.js, in which everything is async by default. [...] So asynchronous programming does not push your computer into overdrive to enable higher performance. What it can do is help the computer to use it’s resources more efficiently, by removing time spent waiting.

He then talks about PHP’s typical flow model – synchronous and single-threaded. While it does make it simpler to debug/understand it also limits it and can cause higher processing times. Thanks to some other projects, however, asynchronous development with PHP has become more of a reality. He shows how to use one of these projects, Icicle, and its coroutines functionality to make a Symfony controller that handles calls to a sayHello method asynchronously, returning messages in a fraction of the normal processing time.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23688

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Symfony Finland: Going Async in Symfony Controllers

Symfony Finland: Going Async in Symfony Controllers

On the Symfony Finland site Jani Tarvainen has posted a tutorial showing you how to create asynchronous controller handling in a Symfony-based application.

Asynchronous programming has become a synonym for high performance in server side web applications in the recent years. This is largely due to the rising popularity of JavaScript and Node.js, in which everything is async by default. [...] So asynchronous programming does not push your computer into overdrive to enable higher performance. What it can do is help the computer to use it’s resources more efficiently, by removing time spent waiting.

He then talks about PHP’s typical flow model – synchronous and single-threaded. While it does make it simpler to debug/understand it also limits it and can cause higher processing times. Thanks to some other projects, however, asynchronous development with PHP has become more of a reality. He shows how to use one of these projects, Icicle, and its coroutines functionality to make a Symfony controller that handles calls to a sayHello method asynchronously, returning messages in a fraction of the normal processing time.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23688

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Symfony Finland: Going Async in Symfony Controllers

Symfony Finland: Going Async in Symfony Controllers

On the Symfony Finland site Jani Tarvainen has posted a tutorial showing you how to create asynchronous controller handling in a Symfony-based application.

Asynchronous programming has become a synonym for high performance in server side web applications in the recent years. This is largely due to the rising popularity of JavaScript and Node.js, in which everything is async by default. [...] So asynchronous programming does not push your computer into overdrive to enable higher performance. What it can do is help the computer to use it’s resources more efficiently, by removing time spent waiting.

He then talks about PHP’s typical flow model – synchronous and single-threaded. While it does make it simpler to debug/understand it also limits it and can cause higher processing times. Thanks to some other projects, however, asynchronous development with PHP has become more of a reality. He shows how to use one of these projects, Icicle, and its coroutines functionality to make a Symfony controller that handles calls to a sayHello method asynchronously, returning messages in a fraction of the normal processing time.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23688

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>