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Archive for Styczeń, 2016

/Dev/Hell Podcast: Episode 70: Anti-Canuckite Leanings

/Dev/Hell Podcast: Episode 70: Anti-Canuckite Leanings

The /Dev/Hell podcast, hosted by PHP community members Ed Finkler and Chris Hartjes has posted their latest episode: Episode #70: Anti-Canuckite Leanings.

During the discussions for topics for this episode, Chris went to the bathroom for some quiet time. When he came back Ed had asked dedicated grumpy-Canadian hater Amanda Folson to join this episode to talk a bit about the life of a developer evangelist, Greg LeMonde, the Battle for PHP CoC, how Composer saved PHP, and CodeMash.

Along the way Amanda and Ed ganged up on Chris showing their hatred for their peace-loving neighbours north of the 49th parallel and during the aftershow drove him away with talk about audio recording equipment.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player or by downloading the mp3 directly. Be sure to subscribe to their feed to keep up with the latest episodes as they’re released too.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23596

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CloudWays Blog: Co-Founder Of PHPwomen, Ligaya Turmelle Talks About PHP, MySQL And PHPTek

CloudWays Blog: Co-Founder Of PHPwomen, Ligaya Turmelle Talks About PHP, MySQL And PHPTek

The CloudWays blog has posted their latest in their series of interview with members of the PHP community. In their latest they talk with Ligaya Turmelle about PHP Women, Oracle, MySQL and php[tek].

Ligaya Turmelle is a MySQL support engineer at Oracle and a co-founder of PHPwomen. She has also attended Oracle conferences as a speaker. In this interview, she shares her experience as a speaker and has also offered her advice on creating a schema of a database and deploying it.

In the rest of the interview Ligaya answers questions about:

  • When and why she made the switch from PHP to database developer
  • Some of her advice as a speaker to those wanting to speak
  • What some of her key roles are at Oracle working with MySQL
  • Suggestions for optimizing databases and preventing them from becoming "resource hogs"

Be sure to check out the full interview for her answers to these and other questions.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23595

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Rasmus Lerdorf: Upgrading PHP on the EdgeRouter Lite

Rasmus Lerdorf: Upgrading PHP on the EdgeRouter Lite

Rasmus Lerdorf has shared a post to his site detailing how he upgraded his EdgeRouter Lite router (hardware) to use PHP 7 for the uI handling and processing, upgrading it from the PHP 5.4 it came installed with.

After nearly 7 years of service I retired my Asus RT-16 router, which wasn’t really a router, but a re-purposed wifi access point running AdvancedTomato. In its place I got a Ubiquiti EdgeRouter Lite. It is Debian-based and has a dual-core 500MHz 64-Bit MIPS CPU (Cavium Octeon+), 512M of ram and a 4G removable onboard USB stick for < $100. The router is completely open and, in fact, any advanced configuration has to be done from the command line. The Web UI has been improving, but there are still many things you can't do in it. In other words, exactly the type of device I prefer.

He made use of the open platform the router has to upgrade both the PHP installation and a bit of the web UI code to make things work happily with PHP 7. There’s just three steps in his process:

  • Getting a Big-Endian MIPS64 build of PHP 7
  • Configuration (php.ini)
  • Fixing broken stuff

The "broken stuff" in this last item was only a few small changes that needed to be made to the web UI code for raw POST data fetching and session writes. He ends the post with a little summary of the performance post-changes and some about the opcode handling and memory use per request.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23593

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Alfred Nutile: Feature Flags In Laravel

Alfred Nutile: Feature Flags In Laravel

In a post to his site Alfred Nutile has posted a guide to integrating feature flags (toggles) into your Laravel-based application to show and hide features based on different criteria. He makes use of the Atriedes/feature library to handle some of the logic and decisions for him.

We are working on using FeatureFlags or Toggles in our applications. For one we are aiming to do all our work on mainline branch at all times so this would be a key coding discipline to use FeatureFlags so we can hide a feature in progress knowing it will not interfere with the application.

[...] One key thing, as I use this in Laravel, is I will try and mix this with the existing Authorization workflow that is already present. This gives me some already prepared ways to think about this both at the view layer, model layer and controller layer and where to register these states.

He shows how to get the "feature" library installed and integrates it with the Laravel application via two service providers: one for the core flag handling and the other for defining the policies themselves. He includes the code for each of these providers and makes some simple "can see" and "can add" policies for a Twitter field. He also shows the code for the evaluation methods and how to make use of the functionality in a menu (template). He also includes a screencast showing how it all works in a live application.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23592

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Toptal.com: The Vital Guide to PHP Interviewing

Toptal.com: The Vital Guide to PHP Interviewing

On the Toptal PHP blog they’ve posted what they call the "vital guide" to PHP interviewing, a set of questions (and answers) that you could potentially ask a candidate you’re looking to interview for that open PHP role in your organization. Obviously, since interviewing is all relative to the organization, this guide is just that – a series of example questions you could ask to determine overall competency.

Ubiquitous…that is definitely one word you could use to describe PHP in relation to the web. It really is everywhere. [...] But therein lies much of the challenge of finding highly-skilled PHP developers. PHP’s relatively low barrier-to-entry and 20 year history means that PHP developers have become practically as ubiquitous as the technology itself. Yet while many can legitimately claim to “know” PHP, those who are true experts in the language are capable of producing software that is much more scalable, functional, robust, and maintainable.

[...] Toward that goal, this guide offers a sampling of effective questions to help evaluate the breadth and depth of a candidate’s mastery of PHP.

There’s quite a few questions in their guide, touching on a wide range of PHP-related topics both more intermediate and advanced. This includes questions like:

  • "Explain the use and purpose of the global keyword in PHP. Provide an example of a case where its use would be appropriate, as well as one where it would not be."
  • "Describe namespacing in PHP and why it is useful."
  • "Describe the relationship between php://input and $_POST. How would you access the php://input stream?"
  • "Explain the purpose and usage of the __get, __set, __isset, __unset, __call, and __callStatic “magic” methods. When, how, and why (and perhaps why not) should each be used?"
  • "Describe one or more Standard PHP Library (SPL) data structures. Give usage examples."
  • "How does PHP build an array internally?

Each question includes a correct answer (or guidelines to verifying their answer in some of the more open ended questions) so you can ensure the interviewee is competent in the language and its use. Keep in mind, however, that this should not be considered required knowledge for a developer – that’s up to what the organization needs and what level they’re trying to fill.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23586

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var d = new Date();
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document.writeln('’);
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Toptal.com: The Vital Guide to PHP Interviewing

Toptal.com: The Vital Guide to PHP Interviewing

On the Toptal PHP blog they’ve posted what they call the "vital guide" to PHP interviewing, a set of questions (and answers) that you could potentially ask a candidate you’re looking to interview for that open PHP role in your organization. Obviously, since interviewing is all relative to the organization, this guide is just that – a series of example questions you could ask to determine overall competency.

Ubiquitous…that is definitely one word you could use to describe PHP in relation to the web. It really is everywhere. [...] But therein lies much of the challenge of finding highly-skilled PHP developers. PHP’s relatively low barrier-to-entry and 20 year history means that PHP developers have become practically as ubiquitous as the technology itself. Yet while many can legitimately claim to “know” PHP, those who are true experts in the language are capable of producing software that is much more scalable, functional, robust, and maintainable.

[...] Toward that goal, this guide offers a sampling of effective questions to help evaluate the breadth and depth of a candidate’s mastery of PHP.

There’s quite a few questions in their guide, touching on a wide range of PHP-related topics both more intermediate and advanced. This includes questions like:

  • "Explain the use and purpose of the global keyword in PHP. Provide an example of a case where its use would be appropriate, as well as one where it would not be."
  • "Describe namespacing in PHP and why it is useful."
  • "Describe the relationship between php://input and $_POST. How would you access the php://input stream?"
  • "Explain the purpose and usage of the __get, __set, __isset, __unset, __call, and __callStatic “magic” methods. When, how, and why (and perhaps why not) should each be used?"
  • "Describe one or more Standard PHP Library (SPL) data structures. Give usage examples."
  • "How does PHP build an array internally?

Each question includes a correct answer (or guidelines to verifying their answer in some of the more open ended questions) so you can ensure the interviewee is competent in the language and its use. Keep in mind, however, that this should not be considered required knowledge for a developer – that’s up to what the organization needs and what level they’re trying to fill.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23586

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Djordje Kovacevic: PHP cloud hosting comparison (OpenShift vs Heroku vs Fortrabbit)

Djordje Kovacevic: PHP cloud hosting comparison (OpenShift vs Heroku vs Fortrabbit)

In this post to his site Djordje Kovacevic shares the results of his evaluation of hosting providers in the platform-as-a-service arena for hosting PHP applications: OpenShift, Heroku and Fortrabbit.

I want PHP 5.6+, so I did some basic testing of those services to pick cheep and good solution to host my blog. OpenShift because I use it and it’s free for 3 small gears, it was pretty good solution few years ago. Heroku because I used it for Ruby on Rails projects and they support multiple languages (even multiple build packs for one project)! I used FortRabbit too, so I decided to test theirs new apps.

For his testing he used a simple Laravel (v5.2) application with a handful of routes – something simple just to test out the setup and deployment processes. There is a "tl;dr" of the results but he also gets a bit more in-depth on what each service has to offer and some of the pros and cons of each. He also includes the results of some basic performance testing on the instances, linking to the raw output if you’d like to run your own metrics against it.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23585

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Djordje Kovacevic: PHP cloud hosting comparison (OpenShift vs Heroku vs Fortrabbit)

Djordje Kovacevic: PHP cloud hosting comparison (OpenShift vs Heroku vs Fortrabbit)

In this post to his site Djordje Kovacevic shares the results of his evaluation of hosting providers in the platform-as-a-service arena for hosting PHP applications: OpenShift, Heroku and Fortrabbit.

I want PHP 5.6+, so I did some basic testing of those services to pick cheep and good solution to host my blog. OpenShift because I use it and it’s free for 3 small gears, it was pretty good solution few years ago. Heroku because I used it for Ruby on Rails projects and they support multiple languages (even multiple build packs for one project)! I used FortRabbit too, so I decided to test theirs new apps.

For his testing he used a simple Laravel (v5.2) application with a handful of routes – something simple just to test out the setup and deployment processes. There is a "tl;dr" of the results but he also gets a bit more in-depth on what each service has to offer and some of the pros and cons of each. He also includes the results of some basic performance testing on the instances, linking to the raw output if you’d like to run your own metrics against it.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23585

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
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SitePoint PHP Blog: The PHP Channel’s Survey Results and 2016 Plans

SitePoint PHP Blog: The PHP Channel’s Survey Results and 2016 Plans

A while back the SitePoint PHP blog did a survey asking for reader feedback about the content they provide, what they thought was good/bad about it and what they’d like to see more of in the future. In this new post they share some of these results.

On the last day of 2015, we published a survey asking you, the readers, for an opinion about the PHP channel. It was a pretty open survey with mostly freeform answers allowed, so you could tell us literally anything. All in all, we collected 78 responses so far (the survey will remain open indefinitely, in case someone wants to give us more feedback).

On the average satisfaction scale, we scored 7.42 out of 10, and that’s without excluding the potential trolls who voted 1. That’s a very good result, but we’re determined to improve it further.

The rest of the post then gets into the results in detail, talking about:

  • overall satisfaction with the blog and its contents
  • opinions on the newsletter
  • author feedback
  • favorite types of posts
  • their presence on social media

They end the post with a summary of the things people wanted the most out of the site including more demos/practical examples and more PHP 7-related content. While these results are mostly applicable to the SitePoint PHP blog, they also can be applied a bit more widely across the community and on other sites that publish articles with technical content.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23584

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var d = new Date();
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document.writeln('’);
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SitePoint PHP Blog: The PHP Channel’s Survey Results and 2016 Plans

SitePoint PHP Blog: The PHP Channel’s Survey Results and 2016 Plans

A while back the SitePoint PHP blog did a survey asking for reader feedback about the content they provide, what they thought was good/bad about it and what they’d like to see more of in the future. In this new post they share some of these results.

On the last day of 2015, we published a survey asking you, the readers, for an opinion about the PHP channel. It was a pretty open survey with mostly freeform answers allowed, so you could tell us literally anything. All in all, we collected 78 responses so far (the survey will remain open indefinitely, in case someone wants to give us more feedback).

On the average satisfaction scale, we scored 7.42 out of 10, and that’s without excluding the potential trolls who voted 1. That’s a very good result, but we’re determined to improve it further.

The rest of the post then gets into the results in detail, talking about:

  • overall satisfaction with the blog and its contents
  • opinions on the newsletter
  • author feedback
  • favorite types of posts
  • their presence on social media

They end the post with a summary of the things people wanted the most out of the site including more demos/practical examples and more PHP 7-related content. While these results are mostly applicable to the SitePoint PHP blog, they also can be applied a bit more widely across the community and on other sites that publish articles with technical content.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23584

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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