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Archive for Wrzesień, 2015

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (09.25.2015)

Site News: Popular Posts for This Week (09.25.2015)

Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23191

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Culttt.com: Setting the Context in a Laravel Application

Culttt.com: Setting the Context in a Laravel Application

Continuing on their series about context in Laravel applications, the Culttt.com blog has posted the next part talking about setting the context of the application. In this case the term "context" relates to the "operating environment" the request is happening in (not to be confused with the environment, things like the server/software installed).

Last week we looked at managing context in a Laravel application. Context is a very important aspect of a web application as this foundational structure will be relied upon for almost every piece of code. Setting the context usually involves checking against the business rules of the application.

For example, does the current user have access to this group? Does the current task belong to this project? Can this user create a new post in this thread? These kind of foundational business rules need to be addressed whenever a request enters the application.

He starts by talking about the importance of the URL the user is requesting, pointing out that it should be both useful to identify the resource and provide a "sense of hierarchy" for the application. He then shows how to, using the "Guard" handling in Laravel, to define the context and ensure that the user is operating within an allowed context. Full code is included to set up the system and creating the objects to resolve the group and request information into something useful.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23190

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document.writeln('’);
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Culttt.com: Setting the Context in a Laravel Application

Culttt.com: Setting the Context in a Laravel Application

Continuing on their series about context in Laravel applications, the Culttt.com blog has posted the next part talking about setting the context of the application. In this case the term "context" relates to the "operating environment" the request is happening in (not to be confused with the environment, things like the server/software installed).

Last week we looked at managing context in a Laravel application. Context is a very important aspect of a web application as this foundational structure will be relied upon for almost every piece of code. Setting the context usually involves checking against the business rules of the application.

For example, does the current user have access to this group? Does the current task belong to this project? Can this user create a new post in this thread? These kind of foundational business rules need to be addressed whenever a request enters the application.

He starts by talking about the importance of the URL the user is requesting, pointing out that it should be both useful to identify the resource and provide a "sense of hierarchy" for the application. He then shows how to, using the "Guard" handling in Laravel, to define the context and ensure that the user is operating within an allowed context. Full code is included to set up the system and creating the objects to resolve the group and request information into something useful.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23190

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Culttt.com: Setting the Context in a Laravel Application

Culttt.com: Setting the Context in a Laravel Application

Continuing on their series about context in Laravel applications, the Culttt.com blog has posted the next part talking about setting the context of the application. In this case the term "context" relates to the "operating environment" the request is happening in (not to be confused with the environment, things like the server/software installed).

Last week we looked at managing context in a Laravel application. Context is a very important aspect of a web application as this foundational structure will be relied upon for almost every piece of code. Setting the context usually involves checking against the business rules of the application.

For example, does the current user have access to this group? Does the current task belong to this project? Can this user create a new post in this thread? These kind of foundational business rules need to be addressed whenever a request enters the application.

He starts by talking about the importance of the URL the user is requesting, pointing out that it should be both useful to identify the resource and provide a "sense of hierarchy" for the application. He then shows how to, using the "Guard" handling in Laravel, to define the context and ensure that the user is operating within an allowed context. Full code is included to set up the system and creating the objects to resolve the group and request information into something useful.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23190

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r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
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Rob Allen: The beginner’s guide to contributing to a GitHub project

Rob Allen: The beginner’s guide to contributing to a GitHub project

If you’ve ever wanted to contribute to an open source project but didn’t have any idea where to begin, Rob Allen has a few suggestions to help you get started. His guide is a bit more on the technical level than others that talk more about finding a project or community to be a part of, though.

This is a guide to contributing to an open source project that uses GitHub. It’s mostly based on how I’ve seen Zend Framework, Slim Framework and joind.in operate. However, this is a general guide so check your project’s README for specifics.

He walks you through a four step process to getting ready to contribute and make that first submission to the project of your choice:

  • Set up a working copy on your computer
  • Do some work
  • Create the PR (Pull Request)
  • Review by the maintainers

Naturally, some of this depends on the process that the project follows to take in new submissions, either from an issues list or just random buxfixes. It’s a pretty standard GitHub-centric guide to follow though. He also recommends reading this article from Lorna Mitchell about code reviews and what the maintainers of most open source projects will look for in submissions.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23189

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Cees-Jan Kiewiet: Github auth token on TravisCI

Cees-Jan Kiewiet: Github auth token on TravisCI

In a post to his site Cees-Jan Kiewiet shows you how to get an authentication token from GitHub to use in your testing on the Travis-CI continuous integration service.

The composer cache greatly speeds up your composer part of the build by only going to Github for new downloads. When combined with test lowest, current, and highest possible on Travis you only reach out to Github for new versions. Most likely to happen during the highest possible set of builds, but also when you’ve updated composer.*. This normally isn’t an issue unless you hit Github’s rate limit. And since composer is running on a ‘public’ travis box with a ‘public’ IP address that has been use by many builds before it there is a very very high chance it already hit the 60 requests per hour limit.

[...] To counter this problem we have to set a Github authentication token as environment variable in Travis for each project. And update .travis.yml so the token is used by composer.

He walks you through the steps you’ll need to get a token of your very own:

  • Go to the Settings section on your GitHub account
  • Generate a new Personal Access Token
  • Add the token to the Travis-CI account you’re using for your builds
  • Update your .travis.yml configuration with the token information

Each step includes either a screenshot of where to go or the configuration example you’ll need to use (like in the yml file).

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23188

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Stoyan Stefanov: How to write unmaintainable PHP code

Stoyan Stefanov: How to write unmaintainable PHP code

Stoyan Stefanov has reposted an article he wrote for the PHP Advent (now Web Advent) site with a tongue-in-cheek look at how to write unmaintainable code in PHP applications.

With the unemployment rates lately being at the levels that they are, everybody realizes that job security is important. And what’s the best way to keep a job but to be irreplaceable, one way or another. The simple truth is that if no one can maintain the code you write, you have a job for life. Writing unmaintainable code is a special skill that, strangely enough, seem to come quite naturally to certain developers. But for the rest of you, here are some tips and hints to get you started.

He humorously suggests poor practices in your development such as:

  • starting your new job by being vocal about "shifting paradigms" and "enterprise" code
  • making it impossible for someone to change one thing without effecting another
  • ban coding conventions
  • don’t write unit tests
  • not use templating

…and more. It’s a funny piece that has a good message behind it. It’s a perfect example of what not to do in development (and what to avoid if you’re not doing them currently). The interesting thing is that this was originally published in 2009 and just about all of the points in it are still valid today.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23187

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Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHP (09.24.2015)

Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHP (09.24.2015)

Here’s what was popular in the PHP community one year ago today:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23186

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Laravel News: Behind the app: Chrome Weather Extension

Laravel News: Behind the app: Chrome Weather Extension

The Laravel News site has a post talking about a Chrome extension to fetch the weather, created by Tim Leland, that’s powered by a Laravel-based backend application.

Tim Leland has created a new Chrome Extension for getting not only the current weather, but today’s outlook, and a 5-day forecast. The extension automatically calculates your location and viewing the current temperature is as simple glancing at the menu bar. The temperature is always visible and when you click the button it loads the modal window as shown above. It’s simple and intuitive.

The Extension itself uses a Laravel backend and I wanted to find out more how it works.

The rest of the post shares the Q&A with Tim all about the extension. He answers questions about:

  • why he created the extension
  • how it works with the backend to pull the latest weather
  • where Laravel fits into the process

You can find the extension over in the Chrome store and get it installed.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23170

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Laravel News: Behind the app: Chrome Weather Extension

Laravel News: Behind the app: Chrome Weather Extension

The Laravel News site has a post talking about a Chrome extension to fetch the weather, created by Tim Leland, that’s powered by a Laravel-based backend application.

Tim Leland has created a new Chrome Extension for getting not only the current weather, but today’s outlook, and a 5-day forecast. The extension automatically calculates your location and viewing the current temperature is as simple glancing at the menu bar. The temperature is always visible and when you click the button it loads the modal window as shown above. It’s simple and intuitive.

The Extension itself uses a Laravel backend and I wanted to find out more how it works.

The rest of the post shares the Q&A with Tim all about the extension. He answers questions about:

  • why he created the extension
  • how it works with the backend to pull the latest weather
  • where Laravel fits into the process

You can find the extension over in the Chrome store and get it installed.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/23170

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r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
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