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Archive for Czerwiec, 2015

Joe Ferguson: How I use Laravel Homestead everyday

Joe Ferguson: How I use Laravel Homestead everyday

Joe Ferguson has a new post to his site sharing a bit about how he uses Homestead (the Laravel project’s virtual machine offering) in his every day development.

I feel like I’ve been talking about homestead a lot lately. I feel like Vagrant is such an important part of a developer’s workflow. If you are still using MAMP, WAMP, or installing Virtual Machines manually you are wasting so much of your own time (and your clients money) by not using prebuilt development environments. [...] I prefer to have my open source projects contain a Vagrant environment so that any potential contributor can easily clone my repository and run “vagrant up”. [...] The recent changes to Homestead have brought the option to use Homestead exactly as I do, without having to use my own packages or copy and paste files.

He walks you through the simple process of getting a project set up with this Homestead-per-project configuration:

  • Starting a new Project
  • Adding Homestead as a dependency
  • Make the Homestead configuration for this project

Now when a “vagrant up” is run from the project, Vagrant understands to create a Homestead virtual machine instance, import the base box and configure it to be a locally hosted web server for your application. He also includes instructions for using it with non-Laravel applications and how to share the environment.

Link: http://www.joeferguson.me/how-i-use-laravel-homestead-everyday/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22868

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
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Joe Ferguson: How I use Laravel Homestead everyday

Joe Ferguson: How I use Laravel Homestead everyday

Joe Ferguson has a new post to his site sharing a bit about how he uses Homestead (the Laravel project’s virtual machine offering) in his every day development.

I feel like I’ve been talking about homestead a lot lately. I feel like Vagrant is such an important part of a developer’s workflow. If you are still using MAMP, WAMP, or installing Virtual Machines manually you are wasting so much of your own time (and your clients money) by not using prebuilt development environments. [...] I prefer to have my open source projects contain a Vagrant environment so that any potential contributor can easily clone my repository and run “vagrant up”. [...] The recent changes to Homestead have brought the option to use Homestead exactly as I do, without having to use my own packages or copy and paste files.

He walks you through the simple process of getting a project set up with this Homestead-per-project configuration:

  • Starting a new Project
  • Adding Homestead as a dependency
  • Make the Homestead configuration for this project

Now when a “vagrant up” is run from the project, Vagrant understands to create a Homestead virtual machine instance, import the base box and configure it to be a locally hosted web server for your application. He also includes instructions for using it with non-Laravel applications and how to share the environment.

Link: http://www.joeferguson.me/how-i-use-laravel-homestead-everyday/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22868

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Laravel Podcast: Episode 30: Trouble, Trouble, Trouble…

Laravel Podcast: Episode 30: Trouble, Trouble, Trouble…

The Laravel Podcast, hosted by Matt Stauffer (with regular guests Taylor Otwell and Jeffrey Way) has posted their latest episode today – Episode #30: Trouble, Trouble, Trouble….

In this episode, the crew discusses architecture driven religious wars and the recent drama surrounding Apple Music.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player, by downloading the mp3 or by subscribing to their feed to get this and future episodes as they’re released. Be sure to also follow them on Twitter for announcements when new episodes are released.

Link: http://www.laravelpodcast.com/episodes/13327-episode-30-trouble-trouble-trouble
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22867

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Laravel Podcast: Episode 30: Trouble, Trouble, Trouble…

Laravel Podcast: Episode 30: Trouble, Trouble, Trouble…

The Laravel Podcast, hosted by Matt Stauffer (with regular guests Taylor Otwell and Jeffrey Way) has posted their latest episode today – Episode #30: Trouble, Trouble, Trouble….

In this episode, the crew discusses architecture driven religious wars and the recent drama surrounding Apple Music.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page audio player, by downloading the mp3 or by subscribing to their feed to get this and future episodes as they’re released. Be sure to also follow them on Twitter for announcements when new episodes are released.

Link: http://www.laravelpodcast.com/episodes/13327-episode-30-trouble-trouble-trouble
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22867

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
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Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHP

Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHPHere’s what was popular in the PHP community one year ago today:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22866

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHP

Site News: Blast from the Past – One Year Ago in PHPHere’s what was popular in the PHP community one year ago today:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22866

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Kévin Dunglas: Using PSR-7 in Symfony

Kévin Dunglas: Using PSR-7 in Symfony

With the recent acceptance of the PSR-7 HTTP standard by the PHP-FIG, there’s been a lot of articles about using it in various PHP frameworks. In this new post Kevin Douglas looks at the use of it in Symfony, how it relates to the HttpFoundation component and when it will be included in the framework itself.

Back in 2011, Symfony 2 introduced the HttpFoundation component, a PHP library representing HTTP messages with an object oriented API. HttpFoundation is a key in the success of the HTTP-centric approach of Symfony, and it definitely inspirited the PSR-7 specification. However, PSR-7 and HttpFoundation differ fundamentally in two aspects: PSR-7 messages are immutable, mutability is in the DNA of HttpFoundation and in PSR-7, almost everything is stream.

Because of immutability it is very hard to make HttpFoundation embracing PSR-7 without a huge backward compatibility break impacting thousands of existing applications and bundles.

Work was almost immediately started to support the PSR-7 specification in Symfony, however. As a result support will be ready to be included in Symfony 2.7 but, as the rest of the post shows, it can be introduced in versions 2.3 or greater through a “HTTP message bridge” library. He shows how to get this installed in your Symfony application instance and how to use it in your controllers to interact with Requests and Responses. He does point out, though, that while this can bring your release up to PSR-7 status it comes with some overhead that may not be worth it if you’re concerned about performance.

Link: http://dunglas.fr/2015/06/using-psr-7-in-symfony/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22865

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Kévin Dunglas: Using PSR-7 in Symfony

Kévin Dunglas: Using PSR-7 in Symfony

With the recent acceptance of the PSR-7 HTTP standard by the PHP-FIG, there’s been a lot of articles about using it in various PHP frameworks. In this new post Kevin Douglas looks at the use of it in Symfony, how it relates to the HttpFoundation component and when it will be included in the framework itself.

Back in 2011, Symfony 2 introduced the HttpFoundation component, a PHP library representing HTTP messages with an object oriented API. HttpFoundation is a key in the success of the HTTP-centric approach of Symfony, and it definitely inspirited the PSR-7 specification. However, PSR-7 and HttpFoundation differ fundamentally in two aspects: PSR-7 messages are immutable, mutability is in the DNA of HttpFoundation and in PSR-7, almost everything is stream.

Because of immutability it is very hard to make HttpFoundation embracing PSR-7 without a huge backward compatibility break impacting thousands of existing applications and bundles.

Work was almost immediately started to support the PSR-7 specification in Symfony, however. As a result support will be ready to be included in Symfony 2.7 but, as the rest of the post shows, it can be introduced in versions 2.3 or greater through a “HTTP message bridge” library. He shows how to get this installed in your Symfony application instance and how to use it in your controllers to interact with Requests and Responses. He does point out, though, that while this can bring your release up to PSR-7 status it comes with some overhead that may not be worth it if you’re concerned about performance.

Link: http://dunglas.fr/2015/06/using-psr-7-in-symfony/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22865

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Easy Laravel Book: Using Scopes With Laravel 5

Easy Laravel Book: Using Scopes With Laravel 5

The “Easy Laravel Book” website has posted a new tutorial today looking at the use of scopes in Laravel, a packaging method for creating reusable chunks of code for use across the application.

Applying conditions to queries gives you to power to retrieve and present filtered data in every imaginable manner. Some of these conditions will be used more than others, and Laravel provides a solution for cleanly packaging these conditions into easily readable and reusable statements, known as a scope. In this tutorial I’ll show you how to easily integrate scopes into your Laravel models.

He starts with a simple example of a “where” clause made into a method having a name starting with “scope”. This is a hard-coded scope but he also shows an example of the other option, dynamic scopes, allowing for input from the user as a part of the execution. He also shows a quick example of using these same scopes with relations, making them a part of the “find” result chain.

Link: http://www.easylaravelbook.com/blog/2015/06/23/using-scopes-with-laravel-5/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22864

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Easy Laravel Book: Using Scopes With Laravel 5

Easy Laravel Book: Using Scopes With Laravel 5

The “Easy Laravel Book” website has posted a new tutorial today looking at the use of scopes in Laravel, a packaging method for creating reusable chunks of code for use across the application.

Applying conditions to queries gives you to power to retrieve and present filtered data in every imaginable manner. Some of these conditions will be used more than others, and Laravel provides a solution for cleanly packaging these conditions into easily readable and reusable statements, known as a scope. In this tutorial I’ll show you how to easily integrate scopes into your Laravel models.

He starts with a simple example of a “where” clause made into a method having a name starting with “scope”. This is a hard-coded scope but he also shows an example of the other option, dynamic scopes, allowing for input from the user as a part of the execution. He also shows a quick example of using these same scopes with relations, making them a part of the “find” result chain.

Link: http://www.easylaravelbook.com/blog/2015/06/23/using-scopes-with-laravel-5/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22864

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>