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Archive for Kwiecień, 2015

Run Geek Radio: Episode 002 – Approaching speakers, new running shoes, feeling stupid, S3 log [...]

Run Geek Radio: Episode 002 – Approaching speakers, new running shoes, feeling stupid, S3 log [...]

Run Geek Radio, with host and PHP community member Adam Culp, has posted their latest episode: “Episode 002 – Approaching speakers, new running shoes, feeling stupid, S3 log side project, consultant travel, and technical debt”.

In this episode we speak about PHP community and approachability of conference speakers, new running shoes and typical miles that can be run on a pair of shoes before replacing them as well as wear patterns, feeling stupid in skills if they aren’t used often enough, new s3-logs-analyzer side project created to monitor podcast downloads (but can be used for any files on S3), typical travel as a consultant, and what is technical debt and how to tackle it as well as when an application rewrite is OK.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page player or downloading the mp3. If you enjoy the episode, be sure to subscribe to their feed too.

Link: https://rungeekradio.com/episode002/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22650

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Engine Yard Blog: Composer & Continuous Integration

Engine Yard Blog: Composer & Continuous Integration

In a new post to the Engine Yard blog Nils Adermann provides an overview of using Composer with continuous integration, its role in the overall process and some good practices to follow in its use.

Continous Integration (CI) is the practice of continuously (and automatically) testing every change a developer makes. So automated tests become an integral part of the development process providing direct feedback on changes made. [...] Davey Shafik’s article on Composer’s Lock File explains the typical usage of composer install and update. The key takeaway is that developers should run composer update manually to explicitly update individual dependencies while composer install should be used in automated processes. This principle includes automated test environments.

He points out that using the lock file method reproduces the vendor directory exactly as it is in production and what it means for failures in your automated tests. He also talks about methods to improve the build performance to reduce time spent during the generation of the environment, including the use of the Composer cache data. He includes a few flags you can pass to Composer to reduce not only the libraries it installs but also how it fetches their contents.

Link: https://blog.engineyard.com/2015/composer-continuous-integration
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22649

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Dan Miller: Comparing the PHP 7 and Hack Type Systems

Dan Miller: Comparing the PHP 7 and Hack Type Systems

Dan Miller, a core platform engineer at Etsy, has a new post on his personal site sharing his results from a comparison of the variable typing systems between the Hack language (created by Facebook) and what’s coming in PHP7.

One of the exciting things about PHP 7, aside from the incredible performance improvements, is the introduction of scalar type hinting</a coupled with an optional "strict" mode. When reading the RFC I noticed that PHP 7 code written with type hinting begins to look a lot like Hack. I wanted to find out if you could execute the same code in PHP 7 and Hack, and what the differences in execution might be. Here’s what I found out.

He starts by describing his setup (the versions of PHP7 and HHVM he’s using) and shares a few simple examples. He uses the same(ish) code in both and points out some of the differences in what happens when each is executed. He also points out some of the differences in the features between the two (such as Hack not allowing for default arguments with a value of null). He tries a few more complicated things too, like mixing strict and non-strict files, and the findings. He ends the post with some of his overall thoughts of his results and his excitement about what the future holds for PHP7 and the hinting it will provide.

Link: http://www.dmiller.io/blog/2015/4/26/comparing-the-php7-and-hack-type-systems
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22648

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Community News: Recent posts from PHP Quickfix

Community News: Recent posts from PHP QuickfixRecent posts from the PHP Quickfix site:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22647

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Alejandro Celaya: Composer advanced concepts

Alejandro Celaya: Composer advanced concepts

Alejandro Celaya has shared some advanced concepts when using Composer that you may or may not know this popular tool could do.

Composer is The Tool in any modern PHP project. Nowadays I can’t imagine to work without it. It is much more powerful than some people think, easily solving the integration of third party components in our projects, but there are some advanced features that are less known. I’m going to try to explain some of the best practices and mechanisms bundled with composer.

His list of more advanced techniques and concepts includes:

  • Globally installing composer
  • Create the composer.json file (with composer init)
  • Production environments (and flags to customize the installation)
  • Executing CLI scripts

There’s several more items in his list and each includes a description of the feature/practice and commands or code where appropriate.

Link: http://blog.alejandrocelaya.com/2015/04/25/composer-advanced-concepts/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22646

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Symfony Blog: New in Symfony 2.7

Symfony Blog: New in Symfony 2.7

The Symfony blog has been posted spotlights in several of the improvements in the 2.7 release of the framework over on their blog. Each of them describes the changes and includes some sample code showing the new feature in action:

Keep an eye on the Symfony blog for more of these component spotlights and improvements as they’re released.

Link: http://symfony.com/blog/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22645

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DigitalOcean Community Blog: Horizontally Scaling PHP Applications: A Practical Overview

DigitalOcean Community Blog: Horizontally Scaling PHP Applications: A Practical Overview

On the Digital Ocean blog there’s a new post with a “practical overview” of how to effectively scale PHP applications, specifically as it relates to horizontal scaling not vertical.

Shipping a website or application to production has its own challenges, but when it gets the right traction, it’s a great accomplishment. It always feels good to see the visitor numbers going up, doesn’t it? Except, of course, when your traffic increases so much that it crashes your little LAMP stack. [...] But fear not! There are ways to make your PHP application much more reliable and consistent. If the term scalability crossed your mind, you’ve got the right idea.

The article starts with a brief overview of what scalability is and the main difference between horizontal and vertical scaling (scaling out vs scaling up). They then get into a bit more detail about what horizontal scaling is and how it commonly works in relation to the average PHP application (complete with diagrams). They also talk about some things you can do inside your code to help make things flow a bit more smoothly including decoupling between services and user session/file consistency measures. There’s also a bit at the end about load balancing but as that depends a good bit on what technology you’re using and the actual load, they just provide an overview and some links to other articles and tutorials with more information.

Link: https://www.digitalocean.com/company/blog/horizontally-scaling-php-applications/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22635

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DigitalOcean Community Blog: Horizontally Scaling PHP Applications: A Practical Overview

DigitalOcean Community Blog: Horizontally Scaling PHP Applications: A Practical Overview

On the Digital Ocean blog there’s a new post with a “practical overview” of how to effectively scale PHP applications, specifically as it relates to horizontal scaling not vertical.

Shipping a website or application to production has its own challenges, but when it gets the right traction, it’s a great accomplishment. It always feels good to see the visitor numbers going up, doesn’t it? Except, of course, when your traffic increases so much that it crashes your little LAMP stack. [...] But fear not! There are ways to make your PHP application much more reliable and consistent. If the term scalability crossed your mind, you’ve got the right idea.

The article starts with a brief overview of what scalability is and the main difference between horizontal and vertical scaling (scaling out vs scaling up). They then get into a bit more detail about what horizontal scaling is and how it commonly works in relation to the average PHP application (complete with diagrams). They also talk about some things you can do inside your code to help make things flow a bit more smoothly including decoupling between services and user session/file consistency measures. There’s also a bit at the end about load balancing but as that depends a good bit on what technology you’re using and the actual load, they just provide an overview and some links to other articles and tutorials with more information.

Link: https://www.digitalocean.com/company/blog/horizontally-scaling-php-applications/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22635

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Christoph Rumpel: Hello world, I am Laravel (5)

Christoph Rumpel: Hello world, I am Laravel (5)

With Laravel 5 out in the wild, you may be wondering what this new version has to offer either as someone already using the framework or brand new. In this recent post from Christoph Rumpel you can find out some of the highlights of this new release along with some code samples to illustrate.

So there is this thing called Laravel. You may have heard of it already, but you’re not sure what it is actually about? Or you do, but want to know more about it and its great new features in version 5? Great, this post is especially for you! Laravel is at the same time one of the youngest and most popular PHP frameworks out there. So how does this work together? Let us take a closer look at why it is that popular and how it could be of use for you too. We will go through the main functionalities and talk about brand new features in version 5.

He touches on several different topics including: routing, use of the Eloquent ORM, the “artisan” command line tool, controllers, migrations and form request handling. Each section has some example code and a brief description of the feature. Obviously the Laravel documentation is a much more complete resource for each of these topics, but at least this gives you a feel for the framework and what it can do.

Link: http://christoph-rumpel.com/2015/04/hello-world-i-am-laravel/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22634

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Christoph Rumpel: Hello world, I am Laravel (5)

Christoph Rumpel: Hello world, I am Laravel (5)

With Laravel 5 out in the wild, you may be wondering what this new version has to offer either as someone already using the framework or brand new. In this recent post from Christoph Rumpel you can find out some of the highlights of this new release along with some code samples to illustrate.

So there is this thing called Laravel. You may have heard of it already, but you’re not sure what it is actually about? Or you do, but want to know more about it and its great new features in version 5? Great, this post is especially for you! Laravel is at the same time one of the youngest and most popular PHP frameworks out there. So how does this work together? Let us take a closer look at why it is that popular and how it could be of use for you too. We will go through the main functionalities and talk about brand new features in version 5.

He touches on several different topics including: routing, use of the Eloquent ORM, the “artisan” command line tool, controllers, migrations and form request handling. Each section has some example code and a brief description of the feature. Obviously the Laravel documentation is a much more complete resource for each of these topics, but at least this gives you a feel for the framework and what it can do.

Link: http://christoph-rumpel.com/2015/04/hello-world-i-am-laravel/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/22634

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