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Archive for Sierpień, 2014

php[architect]: August 2014 Issue Released – Beyond PHP

php[architect]: August 2014 Issue Released – Beyond PHP

The latest issue of the php[architect] magazine has officially been released – August 2014, Beyond PHP.

In an increasingly multi-hat career environment, most PHP Devs are often asked to knock out some front end development from time-to-time. This is not as unusual as you may think. Having learned coding in the home-baked-what-the-hell-are-we-doing-dot-com 1.0 world, we were often expected to do everything from cradle to grave. While duties are a lot more (and rightfully so) siloed between front and back end developers than in 1998, we are still expected to (at least) understand the different life-cycles of web development and design.

The articles in this month’s issue include a wide range of topics including:

  • “MeteorJS – It’s Not PHP But Darn It’s Cool” (Alan Blount)
  • “Building a Plugin System with Composer” (Maarten Balliauw)
  • “A Modern Front End Through the Eyes of a PHP Developer” (Aurelio De Rosa)
  • “The Confident Coder: What Type Are You?” (Aaron Saray)

You can pick up a copy to call your own (either print or digital) directly from the php[architect] site. If you like the magazine, consider picking up a year subscription too!

Link: http://www.phparch.com/magazine/2014-2/august/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21622

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php[architect]: August 2014 Issue Released – Beyond PHP

php[architect]: August 2014 Issue Released – Beyond PHP

The latest issue of the php[architect] magazine has officially been released – August 2014, Beyond PHP.

In an increasingly multi-hat career environment, most PHP Devs are often asked to knock out some front end development from time-to-time. This is not as unusual as you may think. Having learned coding in the home-baked-what-the-hell-are-we-doing-dot-com 1.0 world, we were often expected to do everything from cradle to grave. While duties are a lot more (and rightfully so) siloed between front and back end developers than in 1998, we are still expected to (at least) understand the different life-cycles of web development and design.

The articles in this month’s issue include a wide range of topics including:

  • “MeteorJS – It’s Not PHP But Darn It’s Cool” (Alan Blount)
  • “Building a Plugin System with Composer” (Maarten Balliauw)
  • “A Modern Front End Through the Eyes of a PHP Developer” (Aurelio De Rosa)
  • “The Confident Coder: What Type Are You?” (Aaron Saray)

You can pick up a copy to call your own (either print or digital) directly from the php[architect] site. If you like the magazine, consider picking up a year subscription too!

Link: http://www.phparch.com/magazine/2014-2/august/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21622

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var d = new Date();
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SitePoint PHP Blog: Build a New App with Laravel and EmberJS in Vagrant

SitePoint PHP Blog: Build a New App with Laravel and EmberJS in Vagrant

The SitePoint PHP blog has kicked off another series of posts today with part one of a series looking at building an application based on the Laravel PHP framework and EmberJS.

Nowadays, everything is turning into a web application. Even simple websites have a mobile app relying on a REST Api. Web applications are accessible everywhere – on a laptop, desktop, tablet, mobile, and recently on wearable devices like smartwatches. Everything is becoming smaller and faster – front ends are becoming separated from back ends, and only communicate with the server through APIs. In this series, we are going to create a photo uploading app. For the front-end, we will use EmberJs and Foundation 5. [...] For the back-end, we will use Laravel. The source code will be available per-part, and in final shape in the final part of this series.

They go with the Laravel Homestead virtual machine (and Vagrant) to make for a quick setup and stable environment. They help you get it all set up to push up to Heroku and get all needed dependencies, both frontend and backend, installed. They also walk you through the setup of the database, configuring the connection and deploying the application to production.

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/build-new-app-laravel-emberjs-vagrant/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21621

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SitePoint PHP Blog: Build a New App with Laravel and EmberJS in Vagrant

SitePoint PHP Blog: Build a New App with Laravel and EmberJS in Vagrant

The SitePoint PHP blog has kicked off another series of posts today with part one of a series looking at building an application based on the Laravel PHP framework and EmberJS.

Nowadays, everything is turning into a web application. Even simple websites have a mobile app relying on a REST Api. Web applications are accessible everywhere – on a laptop, desktop, tablet, mobile, and recently on wearable devices like smartwatches. Everything is becoming smaller and faster – front ends are becoming separated from back ends, and only communicate with the server through APIs. In this series, we are going to create a photo uploading app. For the front-end, we will use EmberJs and Foundation 5. [...] For the back-end, we will use Laravel. The source code will be available per-part, and in final shape in the final part of this series.

They go with the Laravel Homestead virtual machine (and Vagrant) to make for a quick setup and stable environment. They help you get it all set up to push up to Heroku and get all needed dependencies, both frontend and backend, installed. They also walk you through the setup of the database, configuring the connection and deploying the application to production.

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/build-new-app-laravel-emberjs-vagrant/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21621

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Matthias Noback: Symfony2: Event subsystems

Matthias Noback: Symfony2: Event subsystems

In his latest post Mathias Noback takes a look at the Symfony2 event subsystems and the answer to a common problem he’s had with it in the past: circular references.

Recently I realized that some of the problems I encountered in the past could have been easily solved by what I’m about to explain in this post. [...] The problem is: having a complicated graph of service definitions and their dependencies, which causes a ServiceCircularReferenceException, saying ‘Circular reference detected for service “…”, path: “… -> … -> …”.’ Somewhere in the path of services that form the circle you then find the event_dispatcher service.

He shows the wrong way to solve the problem first by injecting a service container into the listener and using services directly from there. In his “entirely different and much better way” he shows a solution that removes dependencies on the main event dispatcher. He shows how to use the event subsystems to avoid this link and gives a more concrete example for domain-related events (with both code and config).

Link: http://php-and-symfony.matthiasnoback.nl/2014/08/symfony2-event-subsystems/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21620

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Matthias Noback: Symfony2: Event subsystems

Matthias Noback: Symfony2: Event subsystems

In his latest post Mathias Noback takes a look at the Symfony2 event subsystems and the answer to a common problem he’s had with it in the past: circular references.

Recently I realized that some of the problems I encountered in the past could have been easily solved by what I’m about to explain in this post. [...] The problem is: having a complicated graph of service definitions and their dependencies, which causes a ServiceCircularReferenceException, saying ‘Circular reference detected for service “…”, path: “… -> … -> …”.’ Somewhere in the path of services that form the circle you then find the event_dispatcher service.

He shows the wrong way to solve the problem first by injecting a service container into the listener and using services directly from there. In his “entirely different and much better way” he shows a solution that removes dependencies on the main event dispatcher. He shows how to use the event subsystems to avoid this link and gives a more concrete example for domain-related events (with both code and config).

Link: http://php-and-symfony.matthiasnoback.nl/2014/08/symfony2-event-subsystems/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21620

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Matthias Noback: Symfony2: Event subsystems

Matthias Noback: Symfony2: Event subsystems

In his latest post Mathias Noback takes a look at the Symfony2 event subsystems and the answer to a common problem he’s had with it in the past: circular references.

Recently I realized that some of the problems I encountered in the past could have been easily solved by what I’m about to explain in this post. [...] The problem is: having a complicated graph of service definitions and their dependencies, which causes a ServiceCircularReferenceException, saying ‘Circular reference detected for service “…”, path: “… -> … -> …”.’ Somewhere in the path of services that form the circle you then find the event_dispatcher service.

He shows the wrong way to solve the problem first by injecting a service container into the listener and using services directly from there. In his “entirely different and much better way” he shows a solution that removes dependencies on the main event dispatcher. He shows how to use the event subsystems to avoid this link and gives a more concrete example for domain-related events (with both code and config).

Link: http://php-and-symfony.matthiasnoback.nl/2014/08/symfony2-event-subsystems/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21620

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Matthew Weier O’Phinney: Testing Code That Emits Output

Matthew Weier O’Phinney: Testing Code That Emits Output

In this latest post to his site Matthew Weier O’Phinney gives his suggestion on how to test (unit test) code that provides some kind of direct output. In his case, his script is outputting header information directly, not as a part of a response string.

Here’s the scenario: you have code that will emit headers and content, for instance, a front controller. How do you test this? The answer is remarkably simple, but non-obvious: namespaces.

He talks some about the use of namespaces in PHP classes (and methods, and constants…) and how things can be importing using them. He gives an example of an object that outputs some header and body information (an “Output” abstract class). He shows how to use the class in a simple test, calling “reset” in the setup and teardown methods and asserting the contents of the headers and body for expected content.

Link: http://mwop.net/blog/2014-08-11-testing-output-generating-code.html
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21619

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Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 08.25.2014

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 08.25.2014Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21618

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Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 08.24.2014

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 08.24.2014Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21617

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