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Archive for Lipiec, 2014

NetTuts.com: Understanding and Working with Data in WordPress

NetTuts.com: Understanding and Working with Data in WordPress

On NetTuts.com there’s a new post for those new to WordPress (or just wanting to figure out more about the internals of the tool) showing how some of the data is structured and how to work with it.

Most WordPress users never come into direct contact with the database and may not even be aware that it’s constantly working to populate their site. When WordPress serves up any kind of page, be that the home page, a single post or page or an archive, it’s accessing the database to bring up content that editors and administrators have added to the site. In this series of tutorials I’ll look in detail at different aspects of the WordPress database.

This post is the first in the series and provides an overview of the database and what kinds of information each one contains. They talk about content types and provide the table structure and relations in a handy graphical form (an ERD). They then go through each of the tables and describe what the data is including link tables, joining the content in different places.

Link: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/understanding-and-working-with-data-in-wordpress–cms-20567
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21497

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Expert Developer: Install PHP CodeSniffer on Windows Machine

Expert Developer: Install PHP CodeSniffer on Windows Machine

On the Expert Developer site there’s a new tutorial showing you how to get the PHP CodeSniffer tool up and working on a Windows installation. PHP CodeSniffer provides functionality to enforce standards and best practices in your application’s development (providing code quality).

In this article we will focus on improving Code Quality. Very first step towards improving code quality is to maintain coding standards across developers. [...] Here we will talk about PHP CodeSniffer, which help us to maintain coding standard across multiple developer. Dealing with CodeSniffer is much easier: create rule set, validate your file against your rule set and get the result immediately. It will immediately show how many mistakes you have made in terms of following coding standards and eventually all developer will start coding as per coding standards you have defined.

There’s two main parts to the article: first is getting PEAR installed (a package manager for PHP) and then using it to install CodeSniffer. Complete instructions and commands are included as well as a few screenshots along the way.

Link: http://www.xpertdeveloper.com/2014/07/install-php-codesniffer-on-windows-machine/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21496

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Sameer Borate: Downloading Gmail attachments in PHP – an update

Sameer Borate: Downloading Gmail attachments in PHP – an update

Sameer Borate has posted an update to a previous post of his about downloading attachments in PHP. In this new post he updates the script to remove any other dependencies other than the IMAP PHP extension.

As mentioned in the earlier post, automatically extracting attachments from Gmail can be important for reasons where you need to process the attached files periodically with a CRON job or need to process the files programmatically. Also it can be useful for automatically archiving important attachments. [The code in this post] is a simple proof-of-concept plain PHP code, devoid of any object-oriented features that extracts attachments from your Gmail account.

The example code makes a request to the Gmail IMAP servers with the given username and password, grabs the first set of emails, parses their attachments to pull them down to the local host. He also includes some searching capability to locate ones only matching certain criteria. A list of the allowed search keywords is also included. He finishes the post with a look at using READONLY mode and fetching the email headers.

Link: http://www.codediesel.com/php/downloading-gmail-attachments-in-php-an-update/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21495

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Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 07.29.2014

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 07.29.2014Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21493

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Inviqa techPortal: "Your code sucks" – Tips on giving feedback

Inviqa techPortal: "Your code sucks" – Tips on giving feedback

If you’re a part of a development team anywhere, chances are at one point or another you’ve asked for someone else to take a look at your code and give their opinions. Maybe it was you looking over a coworker’s latest addition and it was…somewhat lacking. How can you say it in a constructive and nice way? The Inviqa techPortal has some suggestions.

Feedback on performance matters. It not only maintains quality, refines and hones performance, but it can also improve morale and trust, and build relationships. It can stop minor problems from escalating into major capability issues. It’s something that every people manager or team leader should be doing as standard, and yet it’s so hard to get right. For some people, giving good feedback is easy. [...] Delivering negative feedback can be a tricky process so how do you give negative feedback, or (as the much hackneyed phrase would have it) “constructive” feedback?

The post includes a list of six things to think about as you provide feedback to other developers (and even as a manager to your employees). The list suggests things like making it timely, listening to their side of things and setting a plan for resolving the issue.

Link: http://techportal.inviqa.com/2014/07/23/your-code-sucks-tips-on-giving-feedback-2/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21484

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Inviqa techPortal: "Your code sucks" – Tips on giving feedback

Inviqa techPortal: "Your code sucks" – Tips on giving feedback

If you’re a part of a development team anywhere, chances are at one point or another you’ve asked for someone else to take a look at your code and give their opinions. Maybe it was you looking over a coworker’s latest addition and it was…somewhat lacking. How can you say it in a constructive and nice way? The Inviqa techPortal has some suggestions.

Feedback on performance matters. It not only maintains quality, refines and hones performance, but it can also improve morale and trust, and build relationships. It can stop minor problems from escalating into major capability issues. It’s something that every people manager or team leader should be doing as standard, and yet it’s so hard to get right. For some people, giving good feedback is easy. [...] Delivering negative feedback can be a tricky process so how do you give negative feedback, or (as the much hackneyed phrase would have it) “constructive” feedback?

The post includes a list of six things to think about as you provide feedback to other developers (and even as a manager to your employees). The list suggests things like making it timely, listening to their side of things and setting a plan for resolving the issue.

Link: http://techportal.inviqa.com/2014/07/23/your-code-sucks-tips-on-giving-feedback-2/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21484

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SitePoint PHP Blog: 7 More Mistakes Commonly Made by PHP Developers

SitePoint PHP Blog: 7 More Mistakes Commonly Made by PHP Developers

Following several other posts with the “common mistakes PHP developers make” theme, Bruno Skvorc has posted his own list of seven things he sees developers doing over and over.

Back at the end of June, TopTal, the freelance marketplace, published a post about 10 Most Common Mistakes PHP Programmers Make. The list wasn’t exhaustive, but it was well written and pointed out some very interesting pitfalls one should be wary of – even if I wouldn’t personally list the mistakes as very common. I encourage you to give it a thorough read – it has some truly valuable information you should be aware of – especially the first eight points.

His additions to the list of common mistakes includes:

  • Using the mysql extension
  • Not rewriting URLs
  • Assigning in Conditions
  • Being Too Transparent

You can read the full list and summaries of each in the rest of the post.

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/7-mistakes-commonly-made-php-developers/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21483

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SitePoint PHP Blog: 7 More Mistakes Commonly Made by PHP Developers

SitePoint PHP Blog: 7 More Mistakes Commonly Made by PHP Developers

Following several other posts with the “common mistakes PHP developers make” theme, Bruno Skvorc has posted his own list of seven things he sees developers doing over and over.

Back at the end of June, TopTal, the freelance marketplace, published a post about 10 Most Common Mistakes PHP Programmers Make. The list wasn’t exhaustive, but it was well written and pointed out some very interesting pitfalls one should be wary of – even if I wouldn’t personally list the mistakes as very common. I encourage you to give it a thorough read – it has some truly valuable information you should be aware of – especially the first eight points.

His additions to the list of common mistakes includes:

  • Using the mysql extension
  • Not rewriting URLs
  • Assigning in Conditions
  • Being Too Transparent

You can read the full list and summaries of each in the rest of the post.

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/7-mistakes-commonly-made-php-developers/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21483

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PHP.net: PHP 5.4.31 and 5.5.13 Released

PHP.net: PHP 5.4.31 and 5.5.13 Released

The PHP development group has officially released the latest in the PHP 5.4.x and 5.5.x series today: PHP 5.4.31 and PHP 5.5.15

The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 5.4.31 [and PHP 5.5.13[. Over 10 bugs were fixed in this release. All PHP 5.4 users are encouraged to upgrade to this version.

Bugs fixed in these releases include updates to the core language, the built-in CLI server, the PostgreSQL extension and the streams interface. You can view the full list of changes (and related bugs) in the full Changelog. As always, you can download this latest release either from the main downloads page or from windows.php.net for the Windows users.

Link: http://php.net/archive/2014.php#id2014-07-24-2
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21482

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PHP.net: PHP 5.4.31 and 5.5.13 Released

PHP.net: PHP 5.4.31 and 5.5.13 Released

The PHP development group has officially released the latest in the PHP 5.4.x and 5.5.x series today: PHP 5.4.31 and PHP 5.5.15

The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 5.4.31 [and PHP 5.5.13[. Over 10 bugs were fixed in this release. All PHP 5.4 users are encouraged to upgrade to this version.

Bugs fixed in these releases include updates to the core language, the built-in CLI server, the PostgreSQL extension and the streams interface. You can view the full list of changes (and related bugs) in the full Changelog. As always, you can download this latest release either from the main downloads page or from windows.php.net for the Windows users.

Link: http://php.net/archive/2014.php#id2014-07-24-2
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/21482

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