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Archive for Marzec, 2014

Reddit.com: Can anyone suggest a php ecommerce solution that isn’t terrible?

Reddit.com: Can anyone suggest a php ecommerce solution that isn’t terrible?

Over on Reddit.com there’s a good discussion (with plenty of feedback) to a user looking for “a PHP ecommerce solution that isn’t terrible” to replace their aging implementation.

I’ve been using Lemonstand V1 for a couple of years now, it’s been really decent, though they’re zoning it out to make way for V2. They’re moving to a cloud hosted monthly cost, without a lot of core features from V1, which means my agency needs to find an alternative.
Obviously the one that stands out is Magento, but I’ve logged in and clicked around and looks so bad. [...] I have recently found “builtwith.com” which seems to show usage stats for different ecommerce systems, though I cannot seem to find anything very good on that list which looks reliable. The most promising thing I could find was called “Sylius” (http://sylius.org/) which looks fantastic, BUT, it’s newish, and there are no docs, it’s not being supported by a company, it’s only being held up by the community. Can anyone suggest any other alternatives to look into?

The comments to the post range from suggestions of other solutions to attempts to reinforce ones already mentioned:

  • “I’d go with the biggest names in eCommerce for PHP. That will give you the most leverage. We run our own ecommerce software and when your missing a community, features, and market share, it will be a ruff battle selling customers on your solution who are aware of software like Magento.”
  • “No, sorry. No joke. Every ecommerce solution I touched is terrible. And Magento is hell.”
  • “Drupal with the Ubercart module is pretty nice.”
  • “You have checked out OpenCart, haven’t you?”
  • “WooCommerce has been pretty good if you’re on WordPress. Actually similar to Magento.”
  • “In my experience none stand above the rest and all have their drawbacks, especially when you just need to getting something slightly custom up and running. We most recently used CS Cart and it was not terrible.”

Check out the post for more feedback and suggestions.

Link: http://www.reddit.com/r/PHP/comments/21flle/can_anyone_suggest_a_php_ecommerce_solution_that/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20972

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Three Devs and a Maybe Podcast: Web Application Security – Part 2

Three Devs and a Maybe Podcast: Web Application Security – Part 2

The Three Devs and a Maybe podcast has release their latest episode today – Web Application Security – Part 2 (Episode #17).

This week we wrap-up the top ten security risks compiled by OWASP, with discussion on topics including CSRF (Cross Site Request Forgery) and Known Component Vulnerabilities. Also included this week is a brief introduction to Hack and are thoughts on the programming language Go.

If you missed the first part of the series, you can find part one here. You can listen to this latest show by downloading the mp3 or you can subscribe to their feed and get this and other episodes as they’re released.

Link: http://threedevsandamaybe.com/posts/web-application-security-part-2/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20971

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Three Devs and a Maybe Podcast: Web Application Security – Part 2

Three Devs and a Maybe Podcast: Web Application Security – Part 2

The Three Devs and a Maybe podcast has release their latest episode today – Web Application Security – Part 2 (Episode #17).

This week we wrap-up the top ten security risks compiled by OWASP, with discussion on topics including CSRF (Cross Site Request Forgery) and Known Component Vulnerabilities. Also included this week is a brief introduction to Hack and are thoughts on the programming language Go.

If you missed the first part of the series, you can find part one here. You can listen to this latest show by downloading the mp3 or you can subscribe to their feed and get this and other episodes as they’re released.

Link: http://threedevsandamaybe.com/posts/web-application-security-part-2/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20971

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Three Devs and a Maybe Podcast: Web Application Security – Part 2

Three Devs and a Maybe Podcast: Web Application Security – Part 2

The Three Devs and a Maybe podcast has release their latest episode today – Web Application Security – Part 2 (Episode #17).

This week we wrap-up the top ten security risks compiled by OWASP, with discussion on topics including CSRF (Cross Site Request Forgery) and Known Component Vulnerabilities. Also included this week is a brief introduction to Hack and are thoughts on the programming language Go.

If you missed the first part of the series, you can find part one here. You can listen to this latest show by downloading the mp3 or you can subscribe to their feed and get this and other episodes as they’re released.

Link: http://threedevsandamaybe.com/posts/web-application-security-part-2/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20971

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Matthew Weier O’Phinney: Apigility: Using RPC with HAL

Matthew Weier O’Phinney: Apigility: Using RPC with HAL

Matthew Weier O’Phinney has a new post sharing some of the details about using RPC and HAL in the Apigility API tool from Zend. HAL stands for “Hypermedia Access Language” and basically provides a way to define objects in an API and what they relate to.

A few days ago, we released our first beta of Apigility. We’ve started our documentation effort now, and one question has arisen a few times that I want to address: How can you use Hypermedia Application Language (HAL) in RPC services? Hypermedia Application Language is an IETF proposal for how to represent resources and their relations within APIs. Technically, it provides two mediatypes, application/hal+json and application/hal+xml; however, Apigility only provides the JSON variant.

He introduces some of the basics of HAL and includes an example of JSON output showing metadata about the current object such as a full link to the resource. He also includes an example of the “embedded” data, additional related data, other objects, with their own structure and links. He also briefly mentions what RPC is and how it works before getting into how to set up the endpoints in your Apigility API with the help of “ContentNegotiation” functionality.

Link: http://mwop.net/blog/2014-03-26-apigility-rpc-with-hal.html
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20970

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Matthew Weier O’Phinney: Apigility: Using RPC with HAL

Matthew Weier O’Phinney: Apigility: Using RPC with HAL

Matthew Weier O’Phinney has a new post sharing some of the details about using RPC and HAL in the Apigility API tool from Zend. HAL stands for “Hypermedia Access Language” and basically provides a way to define objects in an API and what they relate to.

A few days ago, we released our first beta of Apigility. We’ve started our documentation effort now, and one question has arisen a few times that I want to address: How can you use Hypermedia Application Language (HAL) in RPC services? Hypermedia Application Language is an IETF proposal for how to represent resources and their relations within APIs. Technically, it provides two mediatypes, application/hal+json and application/hal+xml; however, Apigility only provides the JSON variant.

He introduces some of the basics of HAL and includes an example of JSON output showing metadata about the current object such as a full link to the resource. He also includes an example of the “embedded” data, additional related data, other objects, with their own structure and links. He also briefly mentions what RPC is and how it works before getting into how to set up the endpoints in your Apigility API with the help of “ContentNegotiation” functionality.

Link: http://mwop.net/blog/2014-03-26-apigility-rpc-with-hal.html
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20970

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Liip Blog: HHVM and New Relic

Liip Blog: HHVM and New Relic

In this new post to the Liip blog Christian Stocker talks about how they use the popular application and server monitoring service New Relic with the HHVM (despite no official support).

As discussed in one of my last blog posts, we really like New Relic for performance metrics and use it a lot. Unfortunately there isn’t an extension for HHVM (yet) and HHVM is becoming an important part in our setup. But – a big great coincidence – New Relic released an Agent SDK and with that, an example extension for HHVM and WordPress. That was a great start for me to get behind the whole thing.

He talks about writing a HHVM extension and includes an example of the implementation. Christian also talks about the challenges around profiling data and finding out where the requests “spend their time” in the execution. There’s two solutions he suggests, but they each have their tradeoffs (a recompiled/patched version or a performance hit). He provides the extension they’ve built in this github repository.

Link: http://blog.liip.ch/archive/2014/03/27/hhvm-and-new-relic.html
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20969

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Liip Blog: HHVM and New Relic

Liip Blog: HHVM and New Relic

In this new post to the Liip blog Christian Stocker talks about how they use the popular application and server monitoring service New Relic with the HHVM (despite no official support).

As discussed in one of my last blog posts, we really like New Relic for performance metrics and use it a lot. Unfortunately there isn’t an extension for HHVM (yet) and HHVM is becoming an important part in our setup. But – a big great coincidence – New Relic released an Agent SDK and with that, an example extension for HHVM and WordPress. That was a great start for me to get behind the whole thing.

He talks about writing a HHVM extension and includes an example of the implementation. Christian also talks about the challenges around profiling data and finding out where the requests “spend their time” in the execution. There’s two solutions he suggests, but they each have their tradeoffs (a recompiled/patched version or a performance hit). He provides the extension they’ve built in this github repository.

Link: http://blog.liip.ch/archive/2014/03/27/hhvm-and-new-relic.html
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20969

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Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 03.28.2014

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 03.28.2014Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20968

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Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 03.28.2014

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 03.28.2014Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20968

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