Jeśli jesteś właścicielem tej strony, możesz wyłączyć reklamę poniżej zmieniając pakiet na PRO lub VIP w panelu naszego hostingu już od 4zł!

Archive for Październik, 2013

Paul Jones: Publish Your Failures; or, The Way Of All Frameworks

Paul Jones: Publish Your Failures; or, The Way Of All Frameworks

Paul Jones has an interesting post on his site today talking about how how your “framework of choice” will eventually fail even if there is long term support for it. He points to another article about trial and error and emphasizes that (as Richard Feynman has said) failures are just as important as successes.

When it comes to expanding a body of knowledge, the failures are just as important as the successes, perhaps more so in some cases. (Be careful here; they have to be “honest” failures, where you had some reason to believe in advance that it had a good chance of working.) So what is it about the “Pipe Dream” article [here] that impressed me? It is that the the author first signals his tribe membership by mentioning his “framework of choice”, then proceeds to try to do some work outside of that tribe.

Paul goes on to talk about the usefulness of stepping outside of your norm – your framework of choice – and getting a wider perspective on how others do things. He looks at some of the ways that current frameworks could fail in the future and figuring out how well it will deal with it when it does. He points out that several times the failure comes from “subsystem failures” and that systems that allow the swapping out of these components would handle things more gracefully. He gives the example of the Aura framework of this, being highly component-based.

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/4757
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20316

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Paul Jones: Publish Your Failures; or, The Way Of All Frameworks

Paul Jones: Publish Your Failures; or, The Way Of All Frameworks

Paul Jones has an interesting post on his site today talking about how how your “framework of choice” will eventually fail even if there is long term support for it. He points to another article about trial and error and emphasizes that (as Richard Feynman has said) failures are just as important as successes.

When it comes to expanding a body of knowledge, the failures are just as important as the successes, perhaps more so in some cases. (Be careful here; they have to be “honest” failures, where you had some reason to believe in advance that it had a good chance of working.) So what is it about the “Pipe Dream” article [here] that impressed me? It is that the the author first signals his tribe membership by mentioning his “framework of choice”, then proceeds to try to do some work outside of that tribe.

Paul goes on to talk about the usefulness of stepping outside of your norm – your framework of choice – and getting a wider perspective on how others do things. He looks at some of the ways that current frameworks could fail in the future and figuring out how well it will deal with it when it does. He points out that several times the failure comes from “subsystem failures” and that systems that allow the swapping out of these components would handle things more gracefully. He gives the example of the Aura framework of this, being highly component-based.

Link: http://paul-m-jones.com/archives/4757
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20316

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

SitePoint PHP Blog: Building a Web App with Symfony 2: Finalizing

SitePoint PHP Blog: Building a Web App with Symfony 2: Finalizing

On SitePoint’s PHP blog they’ve posted the last part of their series about building a web application with the Symfony2 framework. In this latest part they cover a few more complex things you can do to add features to your application.

In Part 1 and Part 2 of this series, I have covered the basics of using Symfony 2 to develop a functioning web site. In this part of the tutorial, I will cover some more advanced techniques and finish the project with pagination, image watermarks and NativeQuery.

He uses the default image library to add the watermarks (GD) and adds in a new route to view the cover of the book with the watermark applied. He shows how to add simple pagination into the book listing page (via controller attributes) and the use of the NativeQuery Doctrine provides to do more complex queries.

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/building-web-app-symfony-2-finalizing/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20315

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

SitePoint PHP Blog: Building a Web App with Symfony 2: Finalizing

SitePoint PHP Blog: Building a Web App with Symfony 2: Finalizing

On SitePoint’s PHP blog they’ve posted the last part of their series about building a web application with the Symfony2 framework. In this latest part they cover a few more complex things you can do to add features to your application.

In Part 1 and Part 2 of this series, I have covered the basics of using Symfony 2 to develop a functioning web site. In this part of the tutorial, I will cover some more advanced techniques and finish the project with pagination, image watermarks and NativeQuery.

He uses the default image library to add the watermarks (GD) and adds in a new route to view the cover of the book with the watermark applied. He shows how to add simple pagination into the book listing page (via controller attributes) and the use of the NativeQuery Doctrine provides to do more complex queries.

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/building-web-app-symfony-2-finalizing/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20315

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Liip Blog: HHVM with Symfony 2 looks amazing

Liip Blog: HHVM with Symfony 2 looks amazing

On the Liip blog today Christian Stocker shares some of the interesting results he’s found when working with Symfony2 on the HipHop VM (based on Facebook’s work around the HipHop version of optimized PHP). The project recently announced better framework support, so Christian thought he’d give it a try.

We’re currently building a Symfony2 based application, which has pretty high performance requirements (but we can mostly achieve them with varnish), so I went and did some performance tests on that real-life app. [...] In short, the numbers were amazing. I also compared PHP 5.3 with APC against 5.5 with opcache, that alone gave some pretty decent improvements.

He talks about the configuration (hardware and software) he used for the testing and the Apache Bench tool to make the requests. He includes a few tables of the request/response result times comparing the HHVM, PHP 5.3 and PHP 5.5 for:

  • Requests per second, small response

  • Requests per second, middle response
  • Requests per second, large response
  • Median response time in ms, short response
  • Median response time in ms, middle response
  • Median response time in ms, large response

Each also comes with an accompanying graph for those wanting a quick glance version of the results.

Link: http://blog.liip.ch/archive/2013/10/29/hhvm-and-symfony2.html
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20314

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Liip Blog: HHVM with Symfony 2 looks amazing

Liip Blog: HHVM with Symfony 2 looks amazing

On the Liip blog today Christian Stocker shares some of the interesting results he’s found when working with Symfony2 on the HipHop VM (based on Facebook’s work around the HipHop version of optimized PHP). The project recently announced better framework support, so Christian thought he’d give it a try.

We’re currently building a Symfony2 based application, which has pretty high performance requirements (but we can mostly achieve them with varnish), so I went and did some performance tests on that real-life app. [...] In short, the numbers were amazing. I also compared PHP 5.3 with APC against 5.5 with opcache, that alone gave some pretty decent improvements.

He talks about the configuration (hardware and software) he used for the testing and the Apache Bench tool to make the requests. He includes a few tables of the request/response result times comparing the HHVM, PHP 5.3 and PHP 5.5 for:

  • Requests per second, small response

  • Requests per second, middle response
  • Requests per second, large response
  • Median response time in ms, short response
  • Median response time in ms, middle response
  • Median response time in ms, large response

Each also comes with an accompanying graph for those wanting a quick glance version of the results.

Link: http://blog.liip.ch/archive/2013/10/29/hhvm-and-symfony2.html
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20314

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Liip Blog: HHVM with Symfony 2 looks amazing

Liip Blog: HHVM with Symfony 2 looks amazing

On the Liip blog today Christian Stocker shares some of the interesting results he’s found when working with Symfony2 on the HipHop VM (based on Facebook’s work around the HipHop version of optimized PHP). The project recently announced better framework support, so Christian thought he’d give it a try.

We’re currently building a Symfony2 based application, which has pretty high performance requirements (but we can mostly achieve them with varnish), so I went and did some performance tests on that real-life app. [...] In short, the numbers were amazing. I also compared PHP 5.3 with APC against 5.5 with opcache, that alone gave some pretty decent improvements.

He talks about the configuration (hardware and software) he used for the testing and the Apache Bench tool to make the requests. He includes a few tables of the request/response result times comparing the HHVM, PHP 5.3 and PHP 5.5 for:

  • Requests per second, small response

  • Requests per second, middle response
  • Requests per second, large response
  • Median response time in ms, short response
  • Median response time in ms, middle response
  • Median response time in ms, large response

Each also comes with an accompanying graph for those wanting a quick glance version of the results.

Link: http://blog.liip.ch/archive/2013/10/29/hhvm-and-symfony2.html
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20314

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Voices of the ElePHPant: It’s the Booze Talking #5 – PHP Community…again (Part #1)

Voices of the ElePHPant: It’s the Booze Talking #5 – PHP Community…again (Part #1)

The Voices of the ElePHPant podcast has posted their latest episode – another in the “It’s the Booze Talking” series covering the PHP community (part one).

The episode’s guests include Adam Culp, Michelangelo van Dam, Davey Shafik, Eli White, Chris Tankersly and – of course – the infamous Cal Evans as moderator. This session was recorded at this year’s ZendCon conference in Santa Clara.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page player or by downloading the mp3 directly. You can get this and lots more of the ElePHPant by subscribing to their feed too.

Link: http://voicesoftheelephpant.com/2013/10/29/its-the-booze-talking-4-php-community-again-part-1/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20313

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 10.29.2013

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 10.29.2013Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20311

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Community News: Latest PECL Releases for 10.29.2013

Community News: Latest PECL Releases for 10.29.2013Latest PECL Releases:

  • timezonedb 2013.8
    Updated to version 2013.8 (2013h)

  • riak 0.6.2
    - Fixed potential bug in map reduce function
    - Restructured extension sources so php FQN can be mapped directly to source.
    - Changed get output from array to collection, which implements ArrayAccess so it maintains compatability

  • zmq 1.0.9
    - Windows build related fixes

  • zmq 1.0.7
    - Added optional listener socket to ZMQDevice
    - Added support for ZeroMQ 4.x

  • zmq 1.0.8
    - Added config.w32 for Windows builds
    - Removed unused variables and dead code (remicollet)
    - Package tests with the release (remicollet)

  • timezonedb 2013.7
    Updated to version 2013.7 (2013g)

  • lua 1.1.0
    - Fixed #65097 (nApplyCount release missing) (emptyhua at gmail dot com)
    - Trigger E_STRICT when pass an array with index ‘0′ to lua instead of ignoring it
    - added support for callable functions and closures as values returned injected into lua engine (harald at octris dot org)

  • zip 1.12.2
    - fix build with PHP 5.3
    - add –with-libzip configure option to use system libzip
    - move check before dereferencing ptr (Felipe)
    - add LICENSE and LICENSE_libzip
    - fix bug #64342 ZipArchive::addFile() has to check file existance

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20312

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>