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Archive for Wrzesień, 2013

Reddit.com: Question about the relevance of benchmarking

Reddit.com: Question about the relevance of benchmarking

On Reddit.com there’s a new post from someone relatively new to PHP wondering what the relevance of benchmarks is in a time when most performant sites use caching (full page or data) to increase their speed.

I was speaking to another PHP developer today who is a lot smarter than me. I was curious about Static Site Generators taking over the future of the web. [He] told me that most of the time, big sites have a cache that people hit. So people don’t even have to wait for PHP to be interpreted. This begs the question . . . How are performance metrics relevant for different frameworks, when these sites are being cached anyway?

There’s several comments on the post now with a few different opinions like:

  • “Most of the benchmarks you’ll see are dishonest and/or skewed as they don’t paint an accurate picture of what’s going on, or how they would be used in the real world.”
  • “As soon as you start taking too much time to return a page to a user you have a knock-on effect where you develop a queue of other users waiting for their page to be returned as well.”
  • “So far as performance benchmarks go, the framework and language used in your application becomes redundant once you add a caching layer as the page performance is then limited by what caching layer you use.”

  • “as a rule of thumb “logged out users see cached content” “logged in users see uncached content”"

Link: http://www.reddit.com/r/PHP/comments/1n5ygr/i_am_an_idiot_question_about_the_relevance_of
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20172

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Reddit.com: Question about the relevance of benchmarking

Reddit.com: Question about the relevance of benchmarking

On Reddit.com there’s a new post from someone relatively new to PHP wondering what the relevance of benchmarks is in a time when most performant sites use caching (full page or data) to increase their speed.

I was speaking to another PHP developer today who is a lot smarter than me. I was curious about Static Site Generators taking over the future of the web. [He] told me that most of the time, big sites have a cache that people hit. So people don’t even have to wait for PHP to be interpreted. This begs the question . . . How are performance metrics relevant for different frameworks, when these sites are being cached anyway?

There’s several comments on the post now with a few different opinions like:

  • “Most of the benchmarks you’ll see are dishonest and/or skewed as they don’t paint an accurate picture of what’s going on, or how they would be used in the real world.”
  • “As soon as you start taking too much time to return a page to a user you have a knock-on effect where you develop a queue of other users waiting for their page to be returned as well.”
  • “So far as performance benchmarks go, the framework and language used in your application becomes redundant once you add a caching layer as the page performance is then limited by what caching layer you use.”

  • “as a rule of thumb “logged out users see cached content” “logged in users see uncached content”"

Link: http://www.reddit.com/r/PHP/comments/1n5ygr/i_am_an_idiot_question_about_the_relevance_of
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20172

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Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 09.27.2013

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 09.27.2013Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20171

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Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 09.27.2013

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 09.27.2013Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20171

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Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 09.27.2013

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 09.27.2013Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20170

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Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 09.27.2013

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 09.27.2013Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20170

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SitePoint PHP Blog: Creating a Subscription-Based Website with Laravel and Recurly, Part 1

SitePoint PHP Blog: Creating a Subscription-Based Website with Laravel and Recurly, Part 1

On the SitePoint PHP blog there’s a post by Lukas White (part one of a series) showing you how to make a subscription-based website with Laravel and Recurely. Recurly is a subscription billing service that takes case of the recurring billing process.

In this two-part series I’ll show you step-by-step how to create a paid subscription-based membership website using Laravel, a PHP5-based framework, and the Recurly payment processing service. First we’ll start by creating a simple site with basic registration, authentication, and user roles and permissions. Then we’ll add payment processing and tie it into the registration process, allowing people to purchase different membership tiers.

He walks you through the full process (well, the first part of it at least) to getting a new Laravel project up and going and a few other libraries you’ll need to connect to the Recurly service. He creates a simple user table and roles/permissions functionality for the Authority connections. He also shows how to make the basic template, login mechanism and user registration system.

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/creating-subscription-based-website-laravel-recurly-1/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20169

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SitePoint PHP Blog: Creating a Subscription-Based Website with Laravel and Recurly, Part 1

SitePoint PHP Blog: Creating a Subscription-Based Website with Laravel and Recurly, Part 1

On the SitePoint PHP blog there’s a post by Lukas White (part one of a series) showing you how to make a subscription-based website with Laravel and Recurely. Recurly is a subscription billing service that takes case of the recurring billing process.

In this two-part series I’ll show you step-by-step how to create a paid subscription-based membership website using Laravel, a PHP5-based framework, and the Recurly payment processing service. First we’ll start by creating a simple site with basic registration, authentication, and user roles and permissions. Then we’ll add payment processing and tie it into the registration process, allowing people to purchase different membership tiers.

He walks you through the full process (well, the first part of it at least) to getting a new Laravel project up and going and a few other libraries you’ll need to connect to the Recurly service. He creates a simple user table and roles/permissions functionality for the Authority connections. He also shows how to make the basic template, login mechanism and user registration system.

Link: http://www.sitepoint.com/creating-subscription-based-website-laravel-recurly-1/
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20169

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Systems Architect:API-based Web Application with Backbone, Require.js and Slim framework

Systems Architect:API-based Web Application with Backbone, Require.js and Slim framework

On the Systems Architect blog there’s a new post from Lukasz Kujawa about creating a simple API-based application combining Slim, Require.js and Backbone. The result is a single-page application that displays a template and a set of links pulled from the backend.

A single-page application (SPA) was something I’ve been exploring for the last few months. I always liked the idea of moving certain responsibilities to the client’s side. After all, why would you like to waste server’s RAM/CPU to buil a HTML page (and pay for a transfer to deliver it) when a web browser is perfectly capable of doing that on its own?

He’s posted the full example to Github, but he does walk through all the code showing how the parts fit together. He starts with the HTML5 template and Javascript side of things, making a simple Backbone router and a “create” route. The views are rendered via the Lo-Dash templating and injected into the page.

As you can see it’s all quite simple. The only problem is that you have to embrace multiple JavaScript frameworks at once but the boilerplate makes it much easier. What I really like about this setup is the structure. It’s similar to how things are done in the back-end and it should be fine even with big applications.

Link: http://systemsarchitect.net/api-based-web-application-with-backbone-require-js-and-slimmvc-framework
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20168

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Systems Architect:API-based Web Application with Backbone, Require.js and Slim framework

Systems Architect:API-based Web Application with Backbone, Require.js and Slim framework

On the Systems Architect blog there’s a new post from Lukasz Kujawa about creating a simple API-based application combining Slim, Require.js and Backbone. The result is a single-page application that displays a template and a set of links pulled from the backend.

A single-page application (SPA) was something I’ve been exploring for the last few months. I always liked the idea of moving certain responsibilities to the client’s side. After all, why would you like to waste server’s RAM/CPU to buil a HTML page (and pay for a transfer to deliver it) when a web browser is perfectly capable of doing that on its own?

He’s posted the full example to Github, but he does walk through all the code showing how the parts fit together. He starts with the HTML5 template and Javascript side of things, making a simple Backbone router and a “create” route. The views are rendered via the Lo-Dash templating and injected into the page.

As you can see it’s all quite simple. The only problem is that you have to embrace multiple JavaScript frameworks at once but the boilerplate makes it much easier. What I really like about this setup is the structure. It’s similar to how things are done in the back-end and it should be fine even with big applications.

Link: http://systemsarchitect.net/api-based-web-application-with-backbone-require-js-and-slimmvc-framework
Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/20168

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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