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Archive for Marzec, 2013

Ben Ramsey: Introducing Array_column() in PHP 5.5

Ben Ramsey: Introducing Array_column() in PHP 5.5

Ben Ramsey has a new post talking about a feature that will become available in the PHP 5.5.x release series of the language – the array_column function. This function will extract all values from an array matching a given key.

My original patch for array_column() was written for PHP 5.2, but it sat around collecting dust for many years, until April of last year, when PHP moved to git and GitHub. That’s when it became easy enough to apply the patch and send a pull request, which I did. [...] My goal for array_column() was simplicity. Many implement the functionality in different ways, and many call the function by other names (such as “pluck”), but I wanted to keep it simple and recognizable.

He includes an example of some sample data and how the function could be used to pull out the “last_name” field from each of the records and return just those as an array. If you’re interested in seeing the original proposal and the RFC that was created for it, you can see it on the PHP wiki.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19344

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Ben Ramsey: Introducing Array_column() in PHP 5.5

Ben Ramsey: Introducing Array_column() in PHP 5.5

Ben Ramsey has a new post talking about a feature that will become available in the PHP 5.5.x release series of the language – the array_column function. This function will extract all values from an array matching a given key.

My original patch for array_column() was written for PHP 5.2, but it sat around collecting dust for many years, until April of last year, when PHP moved to git and GitHub. That’s when it became easy enough to apply the patch and send a pull request, which I did. [...] My goal for array_column() was simplicity. Many implement the functionality in different ways, and many call the function by other names (such as “pluck”), but I wanted to keep it simple and recognizable.

He includes an example of some sample data and how the function could be used to pull out the “last_name” field from each of the records and return just those as an array. If you’re interested in seeing the original proposal and the RFC that was created for it, you can see it on the PHP wiki.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19344

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
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Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 03.17.2013

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 03.17.2013Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19321

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Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 03.17.2013

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 03.17.2013Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19321

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
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Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 03.16.2013

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 03.16.2013Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19320

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var d = new Date();
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Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 03.16.2013

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 03.16.2013Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19320

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
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DZone.com: From Java to PHP

DZone.com: From Java to PHP

On DZone.com today there’s a new post that welcomes those coming from Java over to PHP with a few recommendations and suggestions about what’s different and some things they might find familiar in the transition.

We are welcoming some new colleagues that come from a Java background in the Onebip team, both from the development and operations field. Here’s a primer on learning PHP in this situation, that you may find useful when introducing similar people in your PHP-based projects.

He breaks it up into a few sections:

  • the “absolute basics” (like the differences in variable handling)
  • things to not care about (like procedural PHP or the installation of Apache+PHP)
  • how to “write to a graph” (things like PDO, DateTime)
  • things to watch out for (like == vs === and some php.ini settings)

He also recommends doing some coding katas with TDD to give you a “crash course” in the language and help you learn from more than just reading.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19319

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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DZone.com: From Java to PHP

DZone.com: From Java to PHP

On DZone.com today there’s a new post that welcomes those coming from Java over to PHP with a few recommendations and suggestions about what’s different and some things they might find familiar in the transition.

We are welcoming some new colleagues that come from a Java background in the Onebip team, both from the development and operations field. Here’s a primer on learning PHP in this situation, that you may find useful when introducing similar people in your PHP-based projects.

He breaks it up into a few sections:

  • the “absolute basics” (like the differences in variable handling)
  • things to not care about (like procedural PHP or the installation of Apache+PHP)
  • how to “write to a graph” (things like PDO, DateTime)
  • things to watch out for (like == vs === and some php.ini settings)

He also recommends doing some coding katas with TDD to give you a “crash course” in the language and help you learn from more than just reading.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19319

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Inviqa techPortal: New Relic for PHP: Web Application Performance Monitoring

Inviqa techPortal: New Relic for PHP: Web Application Performance Monitoring

On the Inviqa techPortal today there’s a new post talking about the New Relic monitoring service and what it has to offer PHP developers and their applications to help them manage things like performance and resources.

The performance of a web application plays a critical role in how an application is perceived by its users. It is important to measure it, identify the causes if it changes and react swiftly to any unexpected changes. This article describes an industry leading tool, New Relic, and how it can be used to monitor and improve your site performance. [...] New Relic is a real-time application monitoring service, providing various metrics about the performance of your production site, covering everything from application database queries through to the time it takes for the end-user to view a page.

They walk you through a “getting started” with the tool and how to get it running on your server – for PHP this means installing an “agent” extension and a local daemon for it to feed information back to. They then get into some of the data New Relic provides including application performance details, browser information, throughput and an Apdex score.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19318

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Inviqa techPortal: New Relic for PHP: Web Application Performance Monitoring

Inviqa techPortal: New Relic for PHP: Web Application Performance Monitoring

On the Inviqa techPortal today there’s a new post talking about the New Relic monitoring service and what it has to offer PHP developers and their applications to help them manage things like performance and resources.

The performance of a web application plays a critical role in how an application is perceived by its users. It is important to measure it, identify the causes if it changes and react swiftly to any unexpected changes. This article describes an industry leading tool, New Relic, and how it can be used to monitor and improve your site performance. [...] New Relic is a real-time application monitoring service, providing various metrics about the performance of your production site, covering everything from application database queries through to the time it takes for the end-user to view a page.

They walk you through a “getting started” with the tool and how to get it running on your server – for PHP this means installing an “agent” extension and a local daemon for it to feed information back to. They then get into some of the data New Relic provides including application performance details, browser information, throughput and an Apdex score.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19318

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>