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Archive for Marzec, 2013

Anna Filina: Like Athletes, Developers Need Practice Before Performing

Anna Filina: Like Athletes, Developers Need Practice Before Performing

Anna Filina has a new post to her site today suggesting that developers are like athletes, they need to practice before they can be good at what they do.

Think of a developer as an athlete. He or she is aiming for a medal in a competition. A figure skater can’t just perform a triple axel in the Olympics after seeing it done on television. This requires a lot of practice, so that when the time comes, the performance is flawless. Of course, programming doesn’t have to be flawless. One must remain pragmatic, yet it still requires practice before a concept can be safely implemented without breaking the project or missing deadlines. Who will pay for that practice?

He relates the development manager to the coach of a sports team, being the one that guides the developers into being all they can be and trying out new ideas in the process. She also recommends making use of idle time between projects to prototype, do R&D and learn in general.

Developers need a sandbox. If you don’t give it to them, you can end up with one of the following issues. Your entire project could become a sandbox, making it unstable. [...] If you want your developers to get better, allow time for practice, not just learning. It’s necessary, easy to do when planned and provides countless benefits to your company. Let me know how that advice worked out for you.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19353

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PHP.net: PHP 5.5.0 beta1 available

PHP.net: PHP 5.5.0 beta1 available

As is mentioned on PHP.net today, the first beta release of the upcoming PHP 5.5.0 series of the language has been posted for testing – PHP 5.5.0 beta1. This is a development preview and is not meant for production use.

The PHP development team announces the release of the first beta of PHP 5.5.0. This release is the first to include the Zend OPCache. Please help our efforts to provide a stable PHP version and test this version carefully against several different applications, with Zend OPCache enabled and report any bug in the bug tracking system.

This beta includes the mentioned OPCache (formerly the Zend Optimizer+), the array_column function, support for non-scalar Iterator keys in foreach and titling your PHP CLI processes. There’s other changes as well, so check out the NEWS for all of them. If you’d like to help out and test this release against your application, check out this post from Phil Sturgeon

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19352

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Inviqa techPortal: PHPNE 2013 Conference Report

Inviqa techPortal: PHPNE 2013 Conference Report

If you weren’t able to attend this year’s PHPNE conference, the Inviqua techPortal has posted this glimpse into what happened during this day long event.

As a native geordie I was pleased to have a chance to attend a PHP conference in the north east. Even after living in Manchester for nearly a decade now, Newcastle still feels like home. [...] I arrived in plenty of time to enjoy the complimentary bacon sandwich and coffee on offer before finding some faces I recognised and settling in to the Electra Room where the main track was due to start, with Inviqa’s very own Rowan Merewood taking to the stage to deliver the opening keynote.

He goes through each of the talks he attended (including the keynote) and gives an overview of their content:

  • Building Better Developers (Rowan Merewood)
  • API Driven Development: Eating Your Own Dog Food (Alex Bilbie)
  • Measuring and Logging Everything in Real Time (Bastian Hofmann)
  • Modernisation of legacy PHP applications using Symfony2 (Fabrice Bernhard)
  • Introduction to Symfony CMF (Likas Kahwe Smith)
  • Keeping The Cloud In Check (Thijs Feryn)

I took something from every talk and I don’t really have a bad word to say about any of it. I hope this does not end up as the only PHPNE, it is only a shame that next year a new venue will likely need to be found as I expect demand for tickets will be high.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19351

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Rob Allen: Objects in the model layer

Rob Allen: Objects in the model layer

In this latest post to his site Rob Allen talks some about application structure and the different kinds of objects he uses in his applications.

I currently use a very simple set of core objects within my model layer: entities, mappers and service objects. [...] I dislike the phrase “service object” as the word “service” means so many things to so many people. I haven’t heard a better phrase yet that everyone understands though.

He defines each of the types of objects to help make the separation clearer. Here they are in brief:

  • Entities are objects that represent something in my business logic.
  • Mappers know how to save and load an entity from the data store.
  • Service objects provide the API that the rest of the application uses.

Some of the comments on the post relate his choices to use in Zend Framework v2-based applications, noting that there are some base components you can extend to create these kinds of objects.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19350

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Rob Allen: Objects in the model layer

Rob Allen: Objects in the model layer

In this latest post to his site Rob Allen talks some about application structure and the different kinds of objects he uses in his applications.

I currently use a very simple set of core objects within my model layer: entities, mappers and service objects. [...] I dislike the phrase “service object” as the word “service” means so many things to so many people. I haven’t heard a better phrase yet that everyone understands though.

He defines each of the types of objects to help make the separation clearer. Here they are in brief:

  • Entities are objects that represent something in my business logic.
  • Mappers know how to save and load an entity from the data store.
  • Service objects provide the API that the rest of the application uses.

Some of the comments on the post relate his choices to use in Zend Framework v2-based applications, noting that there are some base components you can extend to create these kinds of objects.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19350

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W3 Techs: PHP version 5.3 is now the most used version, just ahead of 5.2

W3 Techs: PHP version 5.3 is now the most used version, just ahead of 5.2

According to this new report on the W3 Techs site, the usage of PHP 5.2 has been passed up by the numbers for the usage of PHP 5.3 (finally).

PHP 5.3 has been released in June 2009, so it took a while to gain that level of popularity. End of support for PHP 5.2 has been declared in December 2010, but is was still the most popular version until now. Version 5.3 will enter the end-of-life cycle in March 2013. Version 5.4, used by only 3.0%, is now considered state-of-the-art.

The numbers have been consistently trending towards intersection with the usage of PHP 5.4 picking up, but no where near the 5.3 and 5.2 numbers. They also point out that PHP version adoption has a history of being slow. Contributing factors to this could be the overall impression of the language and how much “room for improvement” it seems to have.

It’s not difficult to predict that PHP as a language will continue to dominate web development in the near future. What will be more exciting is to watch what new versions of PHP will look like.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19349

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Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 03.22.2013

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 03.22.2013Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19348

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Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 03.22.2013

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 03.22.2013Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19347

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Symfony Blog: Symfony Docs Hack Day Needs You on March 30th

Symfony Blog: Symfony Docs Hack Day Needs You on March 30th

On the Symfony blog there’s a post from Ryan Weaver about an upcoming event the project is hosting and how you can help – the Symfony Docs Hack Day (on March 30th).

The first commit to the Symfony documentation was over 3 years ago, and since then, we’ve grown to include a full book, lots of cookbook entries, and sections for most of the individual components. [...] But as we grow, we want to stay aggressive and continue to improve the quality of the docs. This means ensuring that code examples are accurate and pages are easy to understand, balancing the info you need with excess technical clutter. [...] And this is where we need your help! Whether you’re a seasoned-Symfony veteran, a beginner, or even if you don’t think your English is very good, we’d like you to join us on March 30th for our first ever Symfony Docs Hack Day.

The event is a virtual one – everyone will meet up on the Freenode IRC network in the #symfony-docs channel on March 30th from 9am through 5pm Central EU time. Everyone’s invited, not just those who are experts in the framework. Documentation updates are a great way to learn more about a framework too! If you’re interested in what kind of updates they’re looking for, check out this list of open issues with the docs on Github.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19346

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PHPClasses.org: 26 Ways to Show that PHP Can Be Better Than PHP

PHPClasses.org: 26 Ways to Show that PHP Can Be Better Than PHP

In a new blog post on PHPClasses.org today Manuel Lemos has gathered together some of the things that PHP doesn’t have (yet). Most of them are things that developers have expressed a desire for in the core and either have yet to make it into a RFC or are still just being implemented in “userland” code.

The PHP development process is still a bit frustrating. Many developers hoped that PHP had certain features but those are still missing due to several reasons. One way to see those features happen is to write code to implement the features and then submit the code to the PHP core. However that is not a guaranteed process. Even if you provide the necessary code, other developers may object to the addition of those features and the effort is wasted.

Among the things he lists as features that are desired but not implemented yet are things like:

  • Aspect oriented programming
  • Annotations
  • Class generics
  • Introspection of private variables and functions
  • Named parameters

There’s a summary of each of the features mentioned and in some cases links to RFCs that presented the same ideas. If you’re interested in presenting your own ideas to the PHP project for inclusion, you can “demystify” the RFC process by checking out this post from Chris Jones with lots of good suggestions and the flow of how the process (usually) works.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19345

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