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Archive for Luty, 2013

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 02.24.2013

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 02.24.2013Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19228

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Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 02.24.2013

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 02.24.2013Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19228

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r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
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Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 02.23.2013

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 02.23.2013Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19227

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Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 02.23.2013

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 02.23.2013Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19227

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
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Reddit.com: How do you manage many PHP projects? Lots of VMs?

Reddit.com: How do you manage many PHP projects? Lots of VMs?

On Reddit.com there’s a discussion that centers around the management of VMs and PHP projects in a multiple-checkout environments.

I have been using a Linux install for a couple years now and it has development checkouts (and matching databases + live data) for dozens of sites. Since I create a new virtual host for each site there hasn’t been any problems piling more and more projects into this system. However, this computer won’t last forever. [...] Should I setup a new VM + debian install for each project (seems like a lot of work). Should I just move everything to an external drive and point the MySQL data, MongoDB data, Nginx web folders to the attached drive? How do others handle this?

There’s several suggestions made in the comments including things like:

  • Using Ansible for configuration management
  • Bundling the current linux install into one portable VM
  • Using Vagrant for VM management
  • Using source control that can be accessed from any device/VM

Have a VM management method you’ve found useful in your development? Share some about it here.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19223

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Reddit.com: How do you manage many PHP projects? Lots of VMs?

Reddit.com: How do you manage many PHP projects? Lots of VMs?

On Reddit.com there’s a discussion that centers around the management of VMs and PHP projects in a multiple-checkout environments.

I have been using a Linux install for a couple years now and it has development checkouts (and matching databases + live data) for dozens of sites. Since I create a new virtual host for each site there hasn’t been any problems piling more and more projects into this system. However, this computer won’t last forever. [...] Should I setup a new VM + debian install for each project (seems like a lot of work). Should I just move everything to an external drive and point the MySQL data, MongoDB data, Nginx web folders to the attached drive? How do others handle this?

There’s several suggestions made in the comments including things like:

  • Using Ansible for configuration management
  • Bundling the current linux install into one portable VM
  • Using Vagrant for VM management
  • Using source control that can be accessed from any device/VM

Have a VM management method you’ve found useful in your development? Share some about it here.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19223

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Jason Fox: Use the Accept Header to Set Your Return Data With Zend Framework 2

Jason Fox: Use the Accept Header to Set Your Return Data With Zend Framework 2

Jason Fox has a recent post to his site about using “Accept” headers in Zend Framework 2 apps to set the format of the return data from a request.

In this article I detail the process by which you can set up your controller actions in Zend Framework 2 to return either the default HTML, or JSON data depending on the “Accept Header” in the request. It incorporates changes related to a security update added since this very helpful article was written, and expands on some of the intricacies of making your web layer objects better “json providers.”

His example uses a “ViewJsonStrategy” and the criteria to look for to determine which version to respond with (HTML or JSON) – the Accept header. It uses the JSON encoder/decoder instead of the built-in PHP one to he could use the included “toJson” method to customize the output of the JSON instead of just returning everything.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19222

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Jason Fox: Use the Accept Header to Set Your Return Data With Zend Framework 2

Jason Fox: Use the Accept Header to Set Your Return Data With Zend Framework 2

Jason Fox has a recent post to his site about using “Accept” headers in Zend Framework 2 apps to set the format of the return data from a request.

In this article I detail the process by which you can set up your controller actions in Zend Framework 2 to return either the default HTML, or JSON data depending on the “Accept Header” in the request. It incorporates changes related to a security update added since this very helpful article was written, and expands on some of the intricacies of making your web layer objects better “json providers.”

His example uses a “ViewJsonStrategy” and the criteria to look for to determine which version to respond with (HTML or JSON) – the Accept header. It uses the JSON encoder/decoder instead of the built-in PHP one to he could use the included “toJson” method to customize the output of the JSON instead of just returning everything.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19222

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Jason Fox: Use the Accept Header to Set Your Return Data With Zend Framework 2

Jason Fox: Use the Accept Header to Set Your Return Data With Zend Framework 2

Jason Fox has a recent post to his site about using “Accept” headers in Zend Framework 2 apps to set the format of the return data from a request.

In this article I detail the process by which you can set up your controller actions in Zend Framework 2 to return either the default HTML, or JSON data depending on the “Accept Header” in the request. It incorporates changes related to a security update added since this very helpful article was written, and expands on some of the intricacies of making your web layer objects better “json providers.”

His example uses a “ViewJsonStrategy” and the criteria to look for to determine which version to respond with (HTML or JSON) – the Accept header. It uses the JSON encoder/decoder instead of the built-in PHP one to he could use the included “toJson” method to customize the output of the JSON instead of just returning everything.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19222

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Jason Fox: Use the Accept Header to Set Your Return Data With Zend Framework 2

Jason Fox: Use the Accept Header to Set Your Return Data With Zend Framework 2

Jason Fox has a recent post to his site about using “Accept” headers in Zend Framework 2 apps to set the format of the return data from a request.

In this article I detail the process by which you can set up your controller actions in Zend Framework 2 to return either the default HTML, or JSON data depending on the “Accept Header” in the request. It incorporates changes related to a security update added since this very helpful article was written, and expands on some of the intricacies of making your web layer objects better “json providers.”

His example uses a “ViewJsonStrategy” and the criteria to look for to determine which version to respond with (HTML or JSON) – the Accept header. It uses the JSON encoder/decoder instead of the built-in PHP one to he could use the included “toJson” method to customize the output of the JSON instead of just returning everything.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19222

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>