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Archive for Styczeń, 2013

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 01.29.2013

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 01.29.2013Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19101

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Community News: Latest PECL Releases for 01.29.2013

Community News: Latest PECL Releases for 01.29.2013Latest PECL Releases:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19102

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PPI Framework Blog: Tutorial: GeoLocation with FourSquare and Google Maps

PPI Framework Blog: Tutorial: GeoLocation with FourSquare and Google Maps

On the PPI framework blog there’s a recent post showing how to use the framework to create geolocation functionality via an interface with FourSquare and Google Maps.

In this article, we’re going to learn how to work with the framework as a whole by writing a real-world application: making a module, controller, routes, templates (views) and services. In order to achieve this we are will use the Foursquare API, and APC for caching the API lookups. We will plot venues from Foursquare in Google Maps for display.

They help you set up a skeleton application and start on creating the “Foursquare Module” along with its controller and views. There’s Javascript code included to use the Google Maps functionality and a simple class to work with the FourSquare API to get nearby venues. In the end, you’ll have a basic application that maps out the points automatically.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19100

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Patrick Allaert: Composer: speeding up class autoloading

Patrick Allaert: Composer: speeding up class autoloading

In this new post Patrick Allaert offers a solution that can help speed up the inclusion of files via the Composer autoloader (in addition to the already present “optimize-autoloader” option).

The problem with the classmap strategy and the nature of PHP is that there is no (easy) way to have a persistent variable across requests containing the classmap. [...] This [large returned array of mappings] can even take a big portion of your request’s response time when you have hundreds or thousands of classes like it is the case with eZ Publish 5 being based on Symfony, where about 2 600 classes are involved.

He suggests something that could be included into the Composer functionality itself – creating symbolic links in the PSR-0 standard to the location of the files to make it easier for Composer to resolve their location (based on namespace, not having to find them). Some sample code is included showing an additional autoloader that then uses the vendor names to match the path directly.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19099

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7PHP.com: PHP Interview With Paul Dragoonis CTO At BestBuys.com

7PHP.com: PHP Interview With Paul Dragoonis CTO At BestBuys.com

7PHP.com has posted their latest PHP community interview, this time with Paul Dragoonis, Dragoonis CTO At BestBuys.com.

In this edition I talked with Paul Dragoonis who is the CTO at BestBuys.com. [...] With varied skill-sets and having his hand at so many aspects and projects as you will discover when you read through the interview. He is currently “Rising and Shining” with the new PHP meta framework, named PPI Framework – (stay tuned with me, I will bring you an exclusive interview on PPI soon!) The PPI Guy also brews his own Whisky, urmm.. organizes conferences under the entity named WhiskyWeb..

They talk about things like:

  • How he got started with PHP
  • Places he’s involved with in the community
  • His advice to those wanting to be better developers
  • A mention of his PPI framework
  • Things he’s learned from the community

    Check out the full interview here.

    Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19098

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Phil Sturgeon: PHP 6: Pissing in the Wind

Phil Sturgeon: PHP 6: Pissing in the Wind

With some of the recent talk about the consistency of naming methods in PHP (or lack thereof) Phil Sturgeon has put together some ideas about why this (and unicode) changes aren’t happing in the language.

PHP is well known for having an inconsistent API when it comes to PHP functions. Anyone with an anti-PHP point of view will use this as one of their top 3 arguments for why PHP sucks, while most PHP developers will point out that they don’t really care. [...] Another big thing that anti-PHP folks laugh about is the lack of scalar objects, so instead of $string->length() you have to do strlen($string). ANOTHER thing that people often joke about is how PHP 6.0 just never happened, because the team were trying to bake in Unicode support but just came across so many issues that it never happened.

He shares an “obvious answer” to the problems and shares a theory as to why it’s not happening – that no one is really working on out (outisde of this POC) and some of the handling with the recent property accessors RFC. He finishes off the post with three more points, all related to the results of the voting – little points seem to get voted in easier, the representation of developers in the process and that at least one of the “no” votes had to do with not wanting to maintain the results.

Making changes to this language should not be blocked just because a quiet minority of the core team don’t like the idea of being asked to do stuff.

Be sure to check out the comments on the post – there’s lots of them, so be sure you have some good time to read.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19097

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/Dev/Hell Podcast: Episode 27: Artisan Database Administration

/Dev/Hell Podcast: Episode 27: Artisan Database Administration

The latest episode of the /Dev/Hell podcast has been released – Episode 27, “Artisan Database Administration”:

This episode marks a return, both for special guest Selena Deckelmann, and our special hand-made artisan podcasting. Know that this episode was made with locally-sourced bytes, harvested with care and respect for the Earth. We talk with Selena about working at Mozilla, her switch to Linux on the desktop, and how marketing is weightier than merit in determining a product’s success.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page player or by downloading the mp3 of the recording. If you like what you hear, consider subscribing to their feed for more great episodes.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19087

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/Dev/Hell Podcast: Episode 27: Artisan Database Administration

/Dev/Hell Podcast: Episode 27: Artisan Database Administration

The latest episode of the /Dev/Hell podcast has been released – Episode 27, “Artisan Database Administration”:

This episode marks a return, both for special guest Selena Deckelmann, and our special hand-made artisan podcasting. Know that this episode was made with locally-sourced bytes, harvested with care and respect for the Earth. We talk with Selena about working at Mozilla, her switch to Linux on the desktop, and how marketing is weightier than merit in determining a product’s success.

You can listen to this latest episode either through the in-page player or by downloading the mp3 of the recording. If you like what you hear, consider subscribing to their feed for more great episodes.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19087

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PHPMaster.com: PHP and the i, Part 2

PHPMaster.com: PHP and the i, Part 2

On PHPMaster.com today they’ve posted the second part of their “PHP and the i” series (here’s part one). In this new article, he looks a bit closer at what kind of knowledge is needed to develop PHP on the IBM i.

In this somewhat risqué episode, we’ll look at just what you need to be able to do development work on the i. Many people in the i world will that PHP is native to the i, but I don’t think that’s really true. To me, native means that it just runs, no problems or questions asked, nothing special needs to be done, it just sort of happens like when you see someone across a crowded room and know she/he is “the one”. That’s not the way it works with PHP and the i.

He starts off by talking about Zend and its contribution to the IBM i’s abilities to run PHP through RPG thanks to a “bridge” they created. There are other options, but as he points out, they’re not as well developed (or supported) as Zend’s offering (being Zend Server, Zend Studio and Zend Framework).

He then talks about the details of creating and running scripts – where to put them, what kind of RPG knowledge you’ll need to implement them, and which parts of the typical MVC stack work best where.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19086

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PHPMaster.com: PHP and the i, Part 2

PHPMaster.com: PHP and the i, Part 2

On PHPMaster.com today they’ve posted the second part of their “PHP and the i” series (here’s part one). In this new article, he looks a bit closer at what kind of knowledge is needed to develop PHP on the IBM i.

In this somewhat risqué episode, we’ll look at just what you need to be able to do development work on the i. Many people in the i world will that PHP is native to the i, but I don’t think that’s really true. To me, native means that it just runs, no problems or questions asked, nothing special needs to be done, it just sort of happens like when you see someone across a crowded room and know she/he is “the one”. That’s not the way it works with PHP and the i.

He starts off by talking about Zend and its contribution to the IBM i’s abilities to run PHP through RPG thanks to a “bridge” they created. There are other options, but as he points out, they’re not as well developed (or supported) as Zend’s offering (being Zend Server, Zend Studio and Zend Framework).

He then talks about the details of creating and running scripts – where to put them, what kind of RPG knowledge you’ll need to implement them, and which parts of the typical MVC stack work best where.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19086

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