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Archive for Styczeń, 2013

How to fix 404 error reports in WordPress?

How to fix 404 error reports in WordPress?For the most of your visitors are 404 error reports disturbing and maybe a reason to leave your website. For yourself as the website owner, a 404 error report should help you to resolve problems. A “404 – not found” is a sign for a broken link and might harm your website. The best solution would be if [...]


Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/WebDevelopmentBlog/~3/TLAFlYk2VZs/

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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How to fix 404 error reports in WordPress?

How to fix 404 error reports in WordPress?For the most of your visitors are 404 error reports disturbing and maybe a reason to leave your website. For yourself as the website owner, a 404 error report should help you to resolve problems. A “404 – not found” is a sign for a broken link and might harm your website. The best solution would be if [...]


Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/WebDevelopmentBlog/~3/TLAFlYk2VZs/

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Aaron Pollock: Setting up a PHP development environment on a VPS

Aaron Pollock: Setting up a PHP development environment on a VPS

Aaron Pollock has posted a detailed guide that will help you get a full PHP development environment set up on a VPS, complete with a domain name and self-signed certificate.

I’ve been developing PHP apps for over eleven years. PHP remains 85% of what I do on a daily basis. Over that time, I’ve tried lots of WAMP packages to run sites on my Windows computers and, since going Mac, I’ve used the native Apache install that comes with Mac OS X. Six months ago, I decided to try out a remote VPS for my development. The results have been so good that I forget the pain I used to experience on a daily basis doing it any other way.

He walks you through the entire process (you’ll need a VPS first) – it uses an Ubuntu-based setup, but the instructions are relatively easy to port over to other distributions. He helps you set up the system’s hostname, install all needed packages/tools and generate the wildcard self-signed SSL certificate. Finally, he shows how to configure Apache’s virtual hosts and set up a basic site.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19106

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Aaron Pollock: Setting up a PHP development environment on a VPS

Aaron Pollock: Setting up a PHP development environment on a VPS

Aaron Pollock has posted a detailed guide that will help you get a full PHP development environment set up on a VPS, complete with a domain name and self-signed certificate.

I’ve been developing PHP apps for over eleven years. PHP remains 85% of what I do on a daily basis. Over that time, I’ve tried lots of WAMP packages to run sites on my Windows computers and, since going Mac, I’ve used the native Apache install that comes with Mac OS X. Six months ago, I decided to try out a remote VPS for my development. The results have been so good that I forget the pain I used to experience on a daily basis doing it any other way.

He walks you through the entire process (you’ll need a VPS first) – it uses an Ubuntu-based setup, but the instructions are relatively easy to port over to other distributions. He helps you set up the system’s hostname, install all needed packages/tools and generate the wildcard self-signed SSL certificate. Finally, he shows how to configure Apache’s virtual hosts and set up a basic site.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19106

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Brandon Savage: When To Write Bad Code

Brandon Savage: When To Write Bad Code

Brandon Savage has posted some of his thoughts on when it’s okay to write bad code in your development lifecycle:

I’ve been there myself. I recently needed to prototype something. As I sat down to work on it, I had absolutely no idea how I was going to write the component I was working on. And so, I started working – without a plan, without writing tests, without designing an architecture, and without really knowing how the component was going to end up. You know what? The component came out working, but when I was done it was ugly. Totally ugly. The code was bad. But I had a solution, and a solution that worked.

He points out that sometimes, doing things “the right way” can stifle creativity and experimentation – two things that a developer needs to solve the problems they face day to day. He notes that refactoring is a part of their job and moving from a rough prototype to a finished product often improves this skill and can find issues not discovered before.

This does NOT mean that developers can push bad code into a repository. Nothing lives longer than temporary code; see to it that your finished code is always good.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19105

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Brandon Savage: When To Write Bad Code

Brandon Savage: When To Write Bad Code

Brandon Savage has posted some of his thoughts on when it’s okay to write bad code in your development lifecycle:

I’ve been there myself. I recently needed to prototype something. As I sat down to work on it, I had absolutely no idea how I was going to write the component I was working on. And so, I started working – without a plan, without writing tests, without designing an architecture, and without really knowing how the component was going to end up. You know what? The component came out working, but when I was done it was ugly. Totally ugly. The code was bad. But I had a solution, and a solution that worked.

He points out that sometimes, doing things “the right way” can stifle creativity and experimentation – two things that a developer needs to solve the problems they face day to day. He notes that refactoring is a part of their job and moving from a rough prototype to a finished product often improves this skill and can find issues not discovered before.

This does NOT mean that developers can push bad code into a repository. Nothing lives longer than temporary code; see to it that your finished code is always good.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19105

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Symfony Blog: Symfony Live 2013 tour: time to start the new season!

Symfony Blog: Symfony Live 2013 tour: time to start the new season!

As is mentioned in this new post to the Symfony Blog, it’s “time to start a new season” of Symfony-related events (both at other events and Symfony Live).

I’m so happy to announce to all of you Symfony folks, the super exciting Symfony Live year that is waiting for you! This time I promise, this is going to be “Great News” for all of you!

Events mentioned for this year (so far) are:

The largest announcement, though, is the SymfonyCon Europe that will be new this year, an all Symfony conference to be held somewhere in Europe later in 2013.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19104

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Symfony Blog: Symfony Live 2013 tour: time to start the new season!

Symfony Blog: Symfony Live 2013 tour: time to start the new season!

As is mentioned in this new post to the Symfony Blog, it’s “time to start a new season” of Symfony-related events (both at other events and Symfony Live).

I’m so happy to announce to all of you Symfony folks, the super exciting Symfony Live year that is waiting for you! This time I promise, this is going to be “Great News” for all of you!

Events mentioned for this year (so far) are:

The largest announcement, though, is the SymfonyCon Europe that will be new this year, an all Symfony conference to be held somewhere in Europe later in 2013.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19104

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Symfony Blog: Symfony Live 2013 tour: time to start the new season!

Symfony Blog: Symfony Live 2013 tour: time to start the new season!

As is mentioned in this new post to the Symfony Blog, it’s “time to start a new season” of Symfony-related events (both at other events and Symfony Live).

I’m so happy to announce to all of you Symfony folks, the super exciting Symfony Live year that is waiting for you! This time I promise, this is going to be “Great News” for all of you!

Events mentioned for this year (so far) are:

The largest announcement, though, is the SymfonyCon Europe that will be new this year, an all Symfony conference to be held somewhere in Europe later in 2013.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19104

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

PHPMaster.com: Dependency Injection with Pimple

PHPMaster.com: Dependency Injection with Pimple

On PHPMaster.com there’s a new tutorial showing you how to use Pimple (the dependency injection container from the Symfony folks) in your application to manage objects and resources.

In application development, we try to create independent modules so that we can reuse code in future projects. But, it’s difficult to create completely independent modules which provide useful functionality; their dependencies can cause maintenance nightmares unless they are managed properly. This is where Dependency Injection comes in handy, as it gives us the ability to inject the dependencies our code needs to function properly without hard coding them into the modules.

They start with a look at the problem with working with “concerete dependencies”, ones that are hard-coded into your classes making them not only hard to test but potentially difficult to maintain. They include an example of this (a “SocialFeeds” class and friends) and then one of two ways to fix the situation. They start with using constructor-based injection, injecting the Twitter service into the main feeds object. They also talk about another method – setter-based injection – where the objects are injected via specific methods on the object.

As a third alternative, though, they get to using Pimple to manage the objects, making it easier to inject just the one resource into your classes and extract the objects you need from there. There’s also a bit of “advanced” usage of Pimple showing the use of the “share” and “extend” methods.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/19103

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
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