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Archive for Październik, 2012

Optimize your WordPress website

Optimize your WordPress websiteWordPress is already a great piece of software and if you use these great WordPress plugins, is your system is almost ready for production. After your WordPress website is finished, you should do some optimizations on the HTML source code and you have to manipulate the basic behavior of a few features. The following list [...]


Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/WebDevelopmentBlog/~3/BW5EqjU_kww/

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Optimize your WordPress website

Optimize your WordPress websiteWordPress is already a great piece of software and if you use these great WordPress plugins, is your system is almost ready for production. After your WordPress website is finished, you should do some optimizations on the HTML source code and you have to manipulate the basic behavior of a few features. The following list [...]


Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/WebDevelopmentBlog/~3/BW5EqjU_kww/

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Optimize your WordPress website

Optimize your WordPress websiteWordPress is already a great piece of software and if you use these great WordPress plugins, is your system is almost ready for production. After your WordPress website is finished, you should do some optimizations on the HTML source code and you have to manipulate the basic behavior of a few features. The following list [...]


Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/WebDevelopmentBlog/~3/BW5EqjU_kww/

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Optimize your WordPress website

Optimize your WordPress websiteWordPress is already a great piece of software and if you use these great WordPress plugins, is your system is almost ready for production. After your WordPress website is finished, you should do some optimizations on the HTML source code and you have to manipulate the basic behavior of a few features. The following list [...]


Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/WebDevelopmentBlog/~3/BW5EqjU_kww/

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 10.27.2012

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 10.27.2012Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18663

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 10.27.2012

Community News: Packagist Latest Releases for 10.27.2012Recent releases from the Packagist:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18663

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

PHPMaster.com: Introduction to the Law of Demeter

PHPMaster.com: Introduction to the Law of Demeter

On PHPMaster.com today they’ve posted an introduction to the Law of Demeter, an idea that promotes loose coupling between objects that each do their own work. This makes it simpler to make pieces interchangeable and more able to focus on their job.

With so many heuristics stating how and why software systems should cling to a specific approach, it’s pretty disappointing not seeing a broader implementation of them in the world of PHP. For example, the Law of Demeter is probably one of the most underrated in the language’s realm. Effectively, the law’s “talk to your closest friends” mantra still seems to be in a pretty immature state in PHP, something that contributes to rot in the overall quality of several object-oriented code bases.

They look at how keeping the functionality of each object focused and not “knowing too much” is a good thing and include some examples of working with a service locator, serializer and file storage classes.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18662

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

PHPMaster.com: Introduction to the Law of Demeter

PHPMaster.com: Introduction to the Law of Demeter

On PHPMaster.com today they’ve posted an introduction to the Law of Demeter, an idea that promotes loose coupling between objects that each do their own work. This makes it simpler to make pieces interchangeable and more able to focus on their job.

With so many heuristics stating how and why software systems should cling to a specific approach, it’s pretty disappointing not seeing a broader implementation of them in the world of PHP. For example, the Law of Demeter is probably one of the most underrated in the language’s realm. Effectively, the law’s “talk to your closest friends” mantra still seems to be in a pretty immature state in PHP, something that contributes to rot in the overall quality of several object-oriented code bases.

They look at how keeping the functionality of each object focused and not “knowing too much” is a good thing and include some examples of working with a service locator, serializer and file storage classes.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18662

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Smashing Magazine: Why Coding Style Matters

Smashing Magazine: Why Coding Style Matters

On the Smashing Magazine site there’s a new article talking about coding style matters with developing projects with multiple people (or even possible contributors in the future) involved.

Coding style is how your code looks, plain and simple. And by “your,” I actually mean you, the person who is reading this article. Coding style is extremely personal and everyone has their own preferred style. You can discover your own personal style by looking back over code that you’ve written when you didn’t have a style guide to adhere to. Everyone has their own style because of the way they learned to code.

They talk about how everyone has their own personal “style” to their code and how, when working with a team, everyone needs to communicate and make sure their styles match. They also make a few recommendations for your code like leaving “clues” (comments) and making errors easier to spot. There’s also a few links to tools that can help keep your code standardized including CSS Lint and the Eclipse code formatter. PHP, of course, has its own – PHP_CodeSniffer with its own rules.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18661

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Smashing Magazine: Why Coding Style Matters

Smashing Magazine: Why Coding Style Matters

On the Smashing Magazine site there’s a new article talking about coding style matters with developing projects with multiple people (or even possible contributors in the future) involved.

Coding style is how your code looks, plain and simple. And by “your,” I actually mean you, the person who is reading this article. Coding style is extremely personal and everyone has their own preferred style. You can discover your own personal style by looking back over code that you’ve written when you didn’t have a style guide to adhere to. Everyone has their own style because of the way they learned to code.

They talk about how everyone has their own personal “style” to their code and how, when working with a team, everyone needs to communicate and make sure their styles match. They also make a few recommendations for your code like leaving “clues” (comments) and making errors easier to spot. There’s also a few links to tools that can help keep your code standardized including CSS Lint and the Eclipse code formatter. PHP, of course, has its own – PHP_CodeSniffer with its own rules.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18661

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>