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Archive for Sierpień, 2012

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 08.24.2012

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 08.24.2012Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18398

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Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 08.24.2012

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 08.24.2012Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18398

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Anna Filina: Unveiling ConFoo 2013

Anna Filina: Unveiling ConFoo 2013

Anna Filina has a quick new post to her site about the upcoming ConFoo conference happening February 25th through March 1st in Montreal, Canada.

If you have never heard of ConFoo, it is one of the most important developer-oriented conferences. The team brings you speakers from around the globe to share their hands-on experience with various web technologies. The best news is: it’s driven by the community and is non for profit!

The call for papers opens on August 27 and is important even if you are not a speaker. You can vote on all the proposals as they come in, telling the team exactly what you wish to learn.

If you’re interested in speaking this year, you can sign up for their newsletter and get notifications. If you’d just like to find out more about the event, check out the main conference site. (For a look at last year’s event, take a look at its schedule.)

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18397

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Anna Filina: Unveiling ConFoo 2013

Anna Filina: Unveiling ConFoo 2013

Anna Filina has a quick new post to her site about the upcoming ConFoo conference happening February 25th through March 1st in Montreal, Canada.

If you have never heard of ConFoo, it is one of the most important developer-oriented conferences. The team brings you speakers from around the globe to share their hands-on experience with various web technologies. The best news is: it’s driven by the community and is non for profit!

The call for papers opens on August 27 and is important even if you are not a speaker. You can vote on all the proposals as they come in, telling the team exactly what you wish to learn.

If you’re interested in speaking this year, you can sign up for their newsletter and get notifications. If you’d just like to find out more about the event, check out the main conference site. (For a look at last year’s event, take a look at its schedule.)

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18397

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Community News: PHPBestPractices.org – A Short Practical Guide

Community News: PHPBestPractices.org – A Short Practical Guide

There’s another site tossing their hat into the “best practices in PHP” ring (the other being PHP The Right Way) with what they call a “short, practical list for common and confusing tasks” in PHP – PHPBestPractices.org.

[Outdated tutorials and information is] one of the reasons why new PHP programmers are so frequently blamed for ugly, outdated, or insecure code. They can’t help it if the first Google result was a four year old article teaching a five year old method! This document tries to address that. It’s an attempt to compile a set of basic instructions for what can be considered best practices for common and confusing issues and tasks in PHP. If a low-level task has multiple and confusing approaches in PHP, it belongs here.

The site has sections for topics like:

If you’re interested in helping out and adding more content to the site, contain the maintainer and let him know.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18396

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Community News: PHPBestPractices.org – A Short Practical Guide

Community News: PHPBestPractices.org – A Short Practical Guide

There’s another site tossing their hat into the “best practices in PHP” ring (the other being PHP The Right Way) with what they call a “short, practical list for common and confusing tasks” in PHP – PHPBestPractices.org.

[Outdated tutorials and information is] one of the reasons why new PHP programmers are so frequently blamed for ugly, outdated, or insecure code. They can’t help it if the first Google result was a four year old article teaching a five year old method! This document tries to address that. It’s an attempt to compile a set of basic instructions for what can be considered best practices for common and confusing issues and tasks in PHP. If a low-level task has multiple and confusing approaches in PHP, it belongs here.

The site has sections for topics like:

If you’re interested in helping out and adding more content to the site, contain the maintainer and let him know.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18396

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PHPMaster.com: Installing GitList for Local Repos

PHPMaster.com: Installing GitList for Local Repos

If you’re a git user and have thought about bringing things a bit more “in-house” than GitHub but still want some of the perks of the web-based interface, this quick tutorial from PHPMaster about installing Gitlist might interest you.

aking your repositories available in a local intranet is pretty easy, but having a nice interface to interact with those repositories, making collaboration between teams easier, is not that simple. [...] There are other solutions available, but some are too hard to install or, again, hard on the eyes. I recently discovered GitList, a free and open source Git repository viewer. It’s interface resembles GitHub a lot but aims to keep everything simple and clear.

He includes the basic installation steps you’ll need to get it up and running – setting up the environment, downloading and configuring Gitlist to look at your repositories and pointing out that, since the LESS source is included in the download, you can customize it how you see fit.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18395

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PHPMaster.com: Installing GitList for Local Repos

PHPMaster.com: Installing GitList for Local Repos

If you’re a git user and have thought about bringing things a bit more “in-house” than GitHub but still want some of the perks of the web-based interface, this quick tutorial from PHPMaster about installing Gitlist might interest you.

aking your repositories available in a local intranet is pretty easy, but having a nice interface to interact with those repositories, making collaboration between teams easier, is not that simple. [...] There are other solutions available, but some are too hard to install or, again, hard on the eyes. I recently discovered GitList, a free and open source Git repository viewer. It’s interface resembles GitHub a lot but aims to keep everything simple and clear.

He includes the basic installation steps you’ll need to get it up and running – setting up the environment, downloading and configuring Gitlist to look at your repositories and pointing out that, since the LESS source is included in the download, you can customize it how you see fit.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18395

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Anthony Ferrara: Object Scoping: A Triste Against Service Containers

Anthony Ferrara: Object Scoping: A Triste Against Service Containers

In his most recent post Anthony Ferrara talks about service containers, the cousin of dependency injection containers (DIC) that he argues aren’t much better than global variables.

I am a firm believer that service containers are not a form of Dependency Injection, and are only slightly better than global variables. That led me to make a few comments that elicited a reply from two Fuel developers. That led to a rather interesting debate that just couldn’t fit into 140 characters [on Twitter]… So I’m going to go into topics that are tightly related: variable scoping and service locators.

He starts by defining what global variables are (including the requisite Wikipedia definition) and how they’re commonly use “everywhere” in the application, both set and read from. He contrasts this idea against a static variable from a class and redefines the scoping a bit when talking about objects and their properties.

So how does this apply to service locators (aka service containers or dependency injection containers)? Well, all state that’s managed by a service locator immediately becomes global state to the objects that use the locator. So why is it all the rage? It’s simple. It seems simple on the surface. If your object needs another dependency, there’s no need to adjust how it’s constructed, just pull it from the locator. Sounds great, right? Well, not quite.

He points out some of the main issues with using service locators namely difficulty in unit testing them, dependencies within the container, how it violates both the Law of Demeter and the Single Responsibility Principle as well as causing “hidden coupling” issues.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18394

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Anthony Ferrara: Object Scoping: A Triste Against Service Containers

Anthony Ferrara: Object Scoping: A Triste Against Service Containers

In his most recent post Anthony Ferrara talks about service containers, the cousin of dependency injection containers (DIC) that he argues aren’t much better than global variables.

I am a firm believer that service containers are not a form of Dependency Injection, and are only slightly better than global variables. That led me to make a few comments that elicited a reply from two Fuel developers. That led to a rather interesting debate that just couldn’t fit into 140 characters [on Twitter]… So I’m going to go into topics that are tightly related: variable scoping and service locators.

He starts by defining what global variables are (including the requisite Wikipedia definition) and how they’re commonly use “everywhere” in the application, both set and read from. He contrasts this idea against a static variable from a class and redefines the scoping a bit when talking about objects and their properties.

So how does this apply to service locators (aka service containers or dependency injection containers)? Well, all state that’s managed by a service locator immediately becomes global state to the objects that use the locator. So why is it all the rage? It’s simple. It seems simple on the surface. If your object needs another dependency, there’s no need to adjust how it’s constructed, just pull it from the locator. Sounds great, right? Well, not quite.

He points out some of the main issues with using service locators namely difficulty in unit testing them, dependencies within the container, how it violates both the Law of Demeter and the Single Responsibility Principle as well as causing “hidden coupling” issues.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18394

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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