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Archive for Sierpień, 2012

PHPMaster.com: Explore Aspect Oriented Programming with CodeIgniter, Part 3

PHPMaster.com: Explore Aspect Oriented Programming with CodeIgniter, Part 3

PHPMaster.com is back with the third part of their series looking at Aspect Oriented Programming with the CodeIgniter framework. (Part 1, Part 2)

In the previous parts of the series we learned about AOP concepts and the need for using AOP in large scale projects and I introduced CodeIgniter’s hooks as a convenient mechanism for creating AOP functionality from scratch. In this part I’ll show you how to use both XML and comment-based techniques to create custom AOP functionality when a dedicated AOP framework is not available.

They start with the XML configuration that defines a few aspects and pointcuts for the application. This is then read in via the “applyBeforeAspects” and the aspects that should be executed first are extracted, loaded and run. Following this, they take the other approach – based on docblock comments – and pull in the comments (the @before and @after tags) and load/execute the aspects that way instead.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18402

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

PHPMaster.com: Explore Aspect Oriented Programming with CodeIgniter, Part 3

PHPMaster.com: Explore Aspect Oriented Programming with CodeIgniter, Part 3

PHPMaster.com is back with the third part of their series looking at Aspect Oriented Programming with the CodeIgniter framework. (Part 1, Part 2)

In the previous parts of the series we learned about AOP concepts and the need for using AOP in large scale projects and I introduced CodeIgniter’s hooks as a convenient mechanism for creating AOP functionality from scratch. In this part I’ll show you how to use both XML and comment-based techniques to create custom AOP functionality when a dedicated AOP framework is not available.

They start with the XML configuration that defines a few aspects and pointcuts for the application. This is then read in via the “applyBeforeAspects” and the aspects that should be executed first are extracted, loaded and run. Following this, they take the other approach – based on docblock comments – and pull in the comments (the @before and @after tags) and load/execute the aspects that way instead.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18402

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Project: Box – Making Creating PHARs Easier

Project: Box – Making Creating PHARs Easier

There’s a new project on Github that wants to help making your phar archives for your PHP applications. The process is a little obtuse right now and Box wants to simplify it.

Box is a library and command line application for simplifying the PHAR creation process. [Features include] creating new PHARs with a simple configuration file, add and replace files in existing PHARs, extract existing PHARs, with option to cherry pick files and verify PHAR signatures.

The project is still relatively young but it looks like it’s off to a good start. Phar files are a powerful tool to have in a PHP developer’s arsenal but developing them can be a pain. Hopefully something like this can make life easier.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18401

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Project: Box – Making Creating PHARs Easier

Project: Box – Making Creating PHARs Easier

There’s a new project on Github that wants to help making your phar archives for your PHP applications. The process is a little obtuse right now and Box wants to simplify it.

Box is a library and command line application for simplifying the PHAR creation process. [Features include] creating new PHARs with a simple configuration file, add and replace files in existing PHARs, extract existing PHARs, with option to cherry pick files and verify PHAR signatures.

The project is still relatively young but it looks like it’s off to a good start. Phar files are a powerful tool to have in a PHP developer’s arsenal but developing them can be a pain. Hopefully something like this can make life easier.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18401

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

NetTuts.com: Automatic Testing for TDD with PHP

NetTuts.com: Automatic Testing for TDD with PHP

If you practice the TDD (test-driven development) methodology in your work, you know that sometimes switching back and forth between a terminal and your IDE can be distracting. In this new tutorial from NetTuts.com, they show you how to streamline things a bit with a simple Ruby script.

Traditional test-driven development can, at times, be cumbersome. You have to stop writing code in order to run your tests. Luckily, there are solutions, which provide the ability to automatically run your tests as you code. In this tutorial, you will learn how to use a Ruby gem, called watchr, to monitor your code and automatically run the appropriate tests whenever you save your work.

The IDE doesn’t matter in this case because the “watchr” tool keeps an eye on when things change in the watched directory and automatically fires off a script when it sees an update. They include the few short lines of Ruby to make it all happen and even have the “notify-send” command built in to give you a popup about the pass/fail status.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18400

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

NetTuts.com: Automatic Testing for TDD with PHP

NetTuts.com: Automatic Testing for TDD with PHP

If you practice the TDD (test-driven development) methodology in your work, you know that sometimes switching back and forth between a terminal and your IDE can be distracting. In this new tutorial from NetTuts.com, they show you how to streamline things a bit with a simple Ruby script.

Traditional test-driven development can, at times, be cumbersome. You have to stop writing code in order to run your tests. Luckily, there are solutions, which provide the ability to automatically run your tests as you code. In this tutorial, you will learn how to use a Ruby gem, called watchr, to monitor your code and automatically run the appropriate tests whenever you save your work.

The IDE doesn’t matter in this case because the “watchr” tool keeps an eye on when things change in the watched directory and automatically fires off a script when it sees an update. They include the few short lines of Ruby to make it all happen and even have the “notify-send” command built in to give you a popup about the pass/fail status.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18400

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Evan Coury: Q&A about software engineering

Evan Coury: Q&A about software engineering

In response to some questions he got from a student, Evan Coury has shared the answers to his questions about software development and engineering:

I found his questions to be well-posed and thoughtful, so I figured I’d post my responses as a blog post. I’ll be sending this post to Jordan, so if anyone has additional comments or advice for the kid, please feel free to leave some wisdom in the comments!

Some of the questions include:

  • Describe the duties and responsibilities of someone working in software engineering.
  • Do you have assignments that seem to drag on forever, or are they usually pretty quick?
  • Are there any specific tools or equipment required for your job?
  • What are the advantages/disadvantages?
  • So do most people work for themselves, private industry, or the government?

You can read Evan’s answers to these and more in the full post.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18399

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Evan Coury: Q&A about software engineering

Evan Coury: Q&A about software engineering

In response to some questions he got from a student, Evan Coury has shared the answers to his questions about software development and engineering:

I found his questions to be well-posed and thoughtful, so I figured I’d post my responses as a blog post. I’ll be sending this post to Jordan, so if anyone has additional comments or advice for the kid, please feel free to leave some wisdom in the comments!

Some of the questions include:

  • Describe the duties and responsibilities of someone working in software engineering.
  • Do you have assignments that seem to drag on forever, or are they usually pretty quick?
  • Are there any specific tools or equipment required for your job?
  • What are the advantages/disadvantages?
  • So do most people work for themselves, private industry, or the government?

You can read Evan’s answers to these and more in the full post.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18399

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 08.24.2012

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 08.24.2012Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18398

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 08.24.2012

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 08.24.2012Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18398

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>