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Archive for Czerwiec, 2012

Symfony Blog: Symfony Live San Francisco 2012: The Schedule

Symfony Blog: Symfony Live San Francisco 2012: The Schedule

The Symfony Blog has posted about the schedule for this year’s Symfony Live San Francisco being posted:

The schedule for the Symfony Live conference in San Franscico has just been published. For the first time in the US, Symfony developers will be able to take the Symfony certification exam on September 29th. You can already register.

They’re also still looking for sponsors for the event if you’d like to help out. You can also go purchase a ticket if you know you’d like to attend this year’s event (September 26th through 29th in San Francisco, CA).

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18132

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Symfony Blog: Symfony Live San Francisco 2012: The Schedule

Symfony Blog: Symfony Live San Francisco 2012: The Schedule

The Symfony Blog has posted about the schedule for this year’s Symfony Live San Francisco being posted:

The schedule for the Symfony Live conference in San Franscico has just been published. For the first time in the US, Symfony developers will be able to take the Symfony certification exam on September 29th. You can already register.

They’re also still looking for sponsors for the event if you’d like to help out. You can also go purchase a ticket if you know you’d like to attend this year’s event (September 26th through 29th in San Francisco, CA).

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18132

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Jurian Suilman’s Blog: Use 3rd party modules in Zend Framework 2

Jurian Suilman’s Blog: Use 3rd party modules in Zend Framework 2

Jurian Sluiman has posted this guide to using other (3rd party) modules in your Zend Framework 2 applications with a few simple steps (code examples included).

The release of the first RC (release candidate) of Zend Framework 2 is getting close. One last beta (beta5) and then the RC will be announced! With the current pace of modules spawning on GitHub, I think it is a good idea to give some insights in how you can use 3rd party modules. In this blog post I will focus on MVC modules: modules with routes pointing to controllers and view scripts for rendering. Because using a 3rd party MVC module does not mean you are enforced to follow their routing scheme, use their view scripts or use the predefined forms, I will explain how you can modify those options to your needs.

He covers the three steps needed for integration – adding a new route to handle the requests to the module, adding a view script to handle its output and working with a Form instance to add a bit more handling.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18131

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Jurian Suilman’s Blog: Use 3rd party modules in Zend Framework 2

Jurian Suilman’s Blog: Use 3rd party modules in Zend Framework 2

Jurian Sluiman has posted this guide to using other (3rd party) modules in your Zend Framework 2 applications with a few simple steps (code examples included).

The release of the first RC (release candidate) of Zend Framework 2 is getting close. One last beta (beta5) and then the RC will be announced! With the current pace of modules spawning on GitHub, I think it is a good idea to give some insights in how you can use 3rd party modules. In this blog post I will focus on MVC modules: modules with routes pointing to controllers and view scripts for rendering. Because using a 3rd party MVC module does not mean you are enforced to follow their routing scheme, use their view scripts or use the predefined forms, I will explain how you can modify those options to your needs.

He covers the three steps needed for integration – adding a new route to handle the requests to the module, adding a view script to handle its output and working with a Form instance to add a bit more handling.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18131

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Chris Roane’s Blog: Options for Building a Website from a Developers Perspective

Chris Roane’s Blog: Options for Building a Website from a Developers Perspective

Chris Roane has a new post to his blog outlining a few different options web developers today have for creating new websites or applications – static, custom, framework-based or CMS.

Over the years I’ve built many different types of websites. These range from being a few pages, to being very customized with advanced features. I’ve learned there is no clear definition in the best way to create a website. But I do think there are advantages and disadvantages to pursuing different methods. This article takes an analytical look at each option. Let’s take a closer look at the different approaches in building a website.

He includes a brief summary talking about each method and mentions things like benefits and downfalls of the approach and what can be involved in their development.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18130

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Chris Roane’s Blog: Options for Building a Website from a Developers Perspective

Chris Roane’s Blog: Options for Building a Website from a Developers Perspective

Chris Roane has a new post to his blog outlining a few different options web developers today have for creating new websites or applications – static, custom, framework-based or CMS.

Over the years I’ve built many different types of websites. These range from being a few pages, to being very customized with advanced features. I’ve learned there is no clear definition in the best way to create a website. But I do think there are advantages and disadvantages to pursuing different methods. This article takes an analytical look at each option. Let’s take a closer look at the different approaches in building a website.

He includes a brief summary talking about each method and mentions things like benefits and downfalls of the approach and what can be involved in their development.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18130

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Chris Roane’s Blog: Options for Building a Website from a Developers Perspective

Chris Roane’s Blog: Options for Building a Website from a Developers Perspective

Chris Roane has a new post to his blog outlining a few different options web developers today have for creating new websites or applications – static, custom, framework-based or CMS.

Over the years I’ve built many different types of websites. These range from being a few pages, to being very customized with advanced features. I’ve learned there is no clear definition in the best way to create a website. But I do think there are advantages and disadvantages to pursuing different methods. This article takes an analytical look at each option. Let’s take a closer look at the different approaches in building a website.

He includes a brief summary talking about each method and mentions things like benefits and downfalls of the approach and what can be involved in their development.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18130

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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PHPMaster.com: Multi-Factor Authentication with PHP and Twilio

PHPMaster.com: Multi-Factor Authentication with PHP and Twilio

In this new tutorial on PHPMaster.com, Timothy Boronczk looks at using the Twilio API and multi-factor authentication.

You can make and receive phone calls and send and receive text messages using TwiML (Twilio Markup Language) and their REST API. You can work directly with the API, or use one of the available helper libraries. The library I’m using is twilio-php, which is the library released and officially supported by Twilio.

He shows you how to use the Twilio API library to create a connection object to their REST API and perform various actions like sending an SMS and placing a phone call. the code to built the multi-factor authentication is also included – a user login/password is checked against a database and a form is displayed (depending on if they want to voice call or SMS).

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18129

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Mayflower Blog: Software Architecture Decisions – How to do it Wrong the Hard & Easy Way

Mayflower Blog: Software Architecture Decisions – How to do it Wrong the Hard & Easy Way

On the MayFlower blog today there’s a new post looking at two ways to do software architecture (the easy way and hard way) and some of the traditional practices behind its development.

When it comes to software architecture, stuff gets funny. First we learn everything about it at university. We learn to use it as a part of our main project plan. We learn how to do risk evaluation. [...] Since we didn’t have a lot of experience with software back then, the resulting architecture is a badly done, but well documented. This style of software architecture is called “Enterprise Architecture” and usually done by consultants.

They talk about delivering software versus delivering documentation and list some of the actual common reasons software architecture turns out how it does including: “I read about it in a blog”, “It worked for me once” and the idea of the “Golden Hammer” of standardized structures.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18128

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PHP-Tip-a-Day: PHP Tutorial: King Floyd and the Seventeen Princes – A Tale of the Observer Pattern

PHP-Tip-a-Day: PHP Tutorial: King Floyd and the Seventeen Princes – A Tale of the Observer Pattern

On the PHP-Tip-a-Day site today there’s an new “fable” posted in the Design Pattern Fables series. This time it’s about the Observer pattern (and kings and princes).

The first place I recall encountering the observer pattern was not in PHP, but in JavaScript. If you’ve ever set a listener to fire when an event happened, you’ve used the observer pattern. Functions or methods are registered with an object so that when it experiences a specific event, it “notifies” the registered functions or methods by calling them.

His story tells about a royal family, a pregnancy and magic mirrors that allows for instant communication between the family and outlying locations. He relates it to the objects and “watchers” that make up the Observer pattern and gives a brief code example (in Javascript) of a HTML button and a jQuery event observer that fires when it’s clicked.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/18127

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