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Archive for Marzec, 2012

Best of PHP scripts for creating PDF files

Best of PHP scripts for creating PDF filesDynamic PDF generation or HTML to PDF conversions are a common tasks for many web applications. Creating order documents for your eCommerce application, coupons for your sales and marketing campaign or a PDF version from your web pages, are just some examples. You can use PHP class script to create dynamic PDF files. This list is a bout the most popular PHP classes, PDF import functions and PHP scripts with the abbility to convert valid HTML code into PDF files.


Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/WebDevelopmentBlog/~3/DYCA54pKwAs/

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Best of PHP scripts for creating PDF files

Best of PHP scripts for creating PDF filesDynamic PDF generation or HTML to PDF conversions are a common tasks for many web applications. Creating order documents for your eCommerce application, coupons for your sales and marketing campaign or a PDF version from your web pages, are just some examples. You can use PHP class script to create dynamic PDF files. This list is a bout the most popular PHP classes, PDF import functions and PHP scripts with the abbility to convert valid HTML code into PDF files.


Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/WebDevelopmentBlog/~3/DYCA54pKwAs/

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Rob Allen’s Blog: Returning JSON using the Accept header in ZF2

Rob Allen’s Blog: Returning JSON using the Accept header in ZF2

In a previous post Rob Allen showed how to return JSON data from a controller in a Zend Framework 2 application. In this new post he shows how to use the “Accepts” header from the client to do the same thing.

Following yesterday’s article on returning JSON from a ZF2 controller action, Lukas suggested that I should also demonstrate how to use the Accept header to get JSON. So this is how you do it!

You’ll need to create the JsonStrategy first, then you can return the ViewModel from the controller. If all goes well, you should see the sample HTML page rendered in a browser and JSON output when requested with the right “Accept” header (he uses curl in his example).

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17756

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Rob Allen’s Blog: Returning JSON using the Accept header in ZF2

Rob Allen’s Blog: Returning JSON using the Accept header in ZF2

In a previous post Rob Allen showed how to return JSON data from a controller in a Zend Framework 2 application. In this new post he shows how to use the “Accepts” header from the client to do the same thing.

Following yesterday’s article on returning JSON from a ZF2 controller action, Lukas suggested that I should also demonstrate how to use the Accept header to get JSON. So this is how you do it!

You’ll need to create the JsonStrategy first, then you can return the ViewModel from the controller. If all goes well, you should see the sample HTML page rendered in a browser and JSON output when requested with the right “Accept” header (he uses curl in his example).

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17756

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 03.30.2012

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 03.30.2012Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17755

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 03.30.2012

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 03.30.2012Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17755

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Anthony Ferrara’s Blog: The Power of Technical Debt

Anthony Ferrara’s Blog: The Power of Technical Debt

Anthony Ferrara has written up a great post on technical debt, relating it to terms that might be a bit more “real world” for many out there – corresponding financial problems.

Lately, I’ve found myself in a number of discussions about Technical Debt and how it applies to project development. Overall, I think it’s a very powerful tool that — when used wisely — can be a great asset to any team. It seems to me that most of the people that I’ve been talking to really don’t agree, and see Technical Debt as a plague that should be eliminated at first sight. So, I figured I’d share my opinions, and see what you think…

He talks about a few different kinds of technical debt described by the names of their financial counterparts:

  • the Payday Loan (a current concession for the sake of time)
  • a Mortgage (making small parts, payments, of a whole without consideration of the overall picture)
  • a Credit Card (not knowing the need causes a sub-optimal solution)
  • Hidden Debit (an unclear understanding of the full scope of the debt)

He also touches on two other topics – how to find and get rid of the Hidden Debt your project might have and a common misconception that technical debt doesn’t exist in an aglie world.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17754

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Anthony Ferrara’s Blog: The Power of Technical Debt

Anthony Ferrara’s Blog: The Power of Technical Debt

Anthony Ferrara has written up a great post on technical debt, relating it to terms that might be a bit more “real world” for many out there – corresponding financial problems.

Lately, I’ve found myself in a number of discussions about Technical Debt and how it applies to project development. Overall, I think it’s a very powerful tool that — when used wisely — can be a great asset to any team. It seems to me that most of the people that I’ve been talking to really don’t agree, and see Technical Debt as a plague that should be eliminated at first sight. So, I figured I’d share my opinions, and see what you think…

He talks about a few different kinds of technical debt described by the names of their financial counterparts:

  • the Payday Loan (a current concession for the sake of time)
  • a Mortgage (making small parts, payments, of a whole without consideration of the overall picture)
  • a Credit Card (not knowing the need causes a sub-optimal solution)
  • Hidden Debit (an unclear understanding of the full scope of the debt)

He also touches on two other topics – how to find and get rid of the Hidden Debt your project might have and a common misconception that technical debt doesn’t exist in an aglie world.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17754

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

PHPMaster.com: Thoughts of a Pragmatic Tester

PHPMaster.com: Thoughts of a Pragmatic Tester

On PHPMaster.com today there’s a new article with some thoughts of a pragmatic tester – some thoughts from Michael Bodnarchuk about both unit and functional testing.

Here’s how it usually plays out: the developer thinks, “I need to do unit tests, and I should use PHPUnit because it’s a standard. I don’t know much about it, though.” Then he visits the PHPUnit site and reads the first chapter of the documentation, then the second, then the third… and is left scratching his head.

[...] Maybe something similar happened to you. Maybe not. But you really should know what to test and how to test it. Such knowledge comes from experience, so in this article I’ll share some of my experience with unit testing.

The article’s not so much an introduction to unit testing as it is some of the experiences he’s had around testing his applications both at the code level and from a functional perspective. He also mentions some alternatives to the standard PHPUnit testing like Atoum and EnhancePHP.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17753

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

PHPMaster.com: Thoughts of a Pragmatic Tester

PHPMaster.com: Thoughts of a Pragmatic Tester

On PHPMaster.com today there’s a new article with some thoughts of a pragmatic tester – some thoughts from Michael Bodnarchuk about both unit and functional testing.

Here’s how it usually plays out: the developer thinks, “I need to do unit tests, and I should use PHPUnit because it’s a standard. I don’t know much about it, though.” Then he visits the PHPUnit site and reads the first chapter of the documentation, then the second, then the third… and is left scratching his head.

[...] Maybe something similar happened to you. Maybe not. But you really should know what to test and how to test it. Such knowledge comes from experience, so in this article I’ll share some of my experience with unit testing.

The article’s not so much an introduction to unit testing as it is some of the experiences he’s had around testing his applications both at the code level and from a functional perspective. He also mentions some alternatives to the standard PHPUnit testing like Atoum and EnhancePHP.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17753

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>