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Archive for Luty, 2012

Michael Nitschinger’s Blog: RFC: li3_fixtures Rewrite

Michael Nitschinger’s Blog: RFC: li3_fixtures Rewrite

Michael Nitchinger has a new post to his blog about a rewrite for the Lithium framework – changing up the li3_fixtures plugin to make it a bit more of what the community needs.

The li3_fixtures plugin was my first Lithium plugin ever, and while it works okay, I feel there is a lot I can do to make it better and more flexible. In this post I want to share my ideas for a new fixture plugin and also want to gather feedback from the community to make it even more awesome.

He gives three instance where fixtures can come in extremely useful – making effective model unit tests with predictable data, mocking models with shortcuts to the data and mocking out web services. Want to add in your own suggestions for his refactor? Comment on the post!

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17588

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Michael Nitschinger’s Blog: RFC: li3_fixtures Rewrite

Michael Nitschinger’s Blog: RFC: li3_fixtures Rewrite

Michael Nitchinger has a new post to his blog about a rewrite for the Lithium framework – changing up the li3_fixtures plugin to make it a bit more of what the community needs.

The li3_fixtures plugin was my first Lithium plugin ever, and while it works okay, I feel there is a lot I can do to make it better and more flexible. In this post I want to share my ideas for a new fixture plugin and also want to gather feedback from the community to make it even more awesome.

He gives three instance where fixtures can come in extremely useful – making effective model unit tests with predictable data, mocking models with shortcuts to the data and mocking out web services. Want to add in your own suggestions for his refactor? Comment on the post!

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17588

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

7php.com: Interview with Amit Singh – Organizer of PHPCamp.org

7php.com: Interview with Amit Singh – Organizer of PHPCamp.org

On 7php.com today there’s another interview with a member of the PHP community posted – Amit Singh, an organizer of the largest Indian Unconference, PHPCamp.org

In this edition, I talked with Amit Kumar Singh The founder of AmiWorks. Amit (@onlyphp) is a very passionate developer and has been the organizer of the Biggest Un-Conference In Pune in 2008. Following this success, he founded PHPCamp.org. He was the guy who coined the famous “Pune Effect” in India. I have been specially enthusiastic with how he makes each of his projects a simple success by just having the mindset of “Experiments Never Fail” and hence do not hesitate at all in experimenting every of your (coding/projects) dreams.

Questions in the interview ask Amit about things like:

  • His history with the PHP language
  • Some of his advice to a beginner
  • What resources (books, blogs, etc) he recommends
  • How he usually debugs his code
  • Where he sees the PHP ecosystem in five years
  • More about his PHPCamp project/conference

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17587

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

7php.com: Interview with Amit Singh – Organizer of PHPCamp.org

7php.com: Interview with Amit Singh – Organizer of PHPCamp.org

On 7php.com today there’s another interview with a member of the PHP community posted – Amit Singh, an organizer of the largest Indian Unconference, PHPCamp.org

In this edition, I talked with Amit Kumar Singh The founder of AmiWorks. Amit (@onlyphp) is a very passionate developer and has been the organizer of the Biggest Un-Conference In Pune in 2008. Following this success, he founded PHPCamp.org. He was the guy who coined the famous “Pune Effect” in India. I have been specially enthusiastic with how he makes each of his projects a simple success by just having the mindset of “Experiments Never Fail” and hence do not hesitate at all in experimenting every of your (coding/projects) dreams.

Questions in the interview ask Amit about things like:

  • His history with the PHP language
  • Some of his advice to a beginner
  • What resources (books, blogs, etc) he recommends
  • How he usually debugs his code
  • Where he sees the PHP ecosystem in five years
  • More about his PHPCamp project/conference

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17587

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Community News: Latest PEAR Releases for 02.27.2012

Community News: Latest PEAR Releases for 02.27.2012Latest PEAR Releases:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17586

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Community News: Latest PEAR Releases for 02.27.2012

Community News: Latest PEAR Releases for 02.27.2012Latest PEAR Releases:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17586

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Enrise Blog: Zend Framework 2 Performance

Enrise Blog: Zend Framework 2 Performance

On the Enrise blog Tim de Pater has done some benchmarking of some Zend Framework-based applications, comparing the performance of a Zend Framework 1 application to that of a Zend Framework 2 app.

A few days ago I read an article that compared some frameworks. Amongst others, both Zend Framework 1 and Zend Framework 2 were included. What struck me was that ZF2 was 5 times slower then ZF1. I know, it’s in beta, not yet optimized for production use. But I couldn’t believe the difference was so great. So I’ve tested it myself and want to share my results in this blog.

Included in the post are the specs for the machine he used (the host machine and the VirtualBox instances), the versions of ZF he used (1.11.1 and the latest from ZF2) and a script that uses ApacheBench to perform the testing. His testing involved benchmarking the requests per second that each application was able to perform. In all cases the ZF2 performance was slower (consistently) by a factor of about four times. The Zend Framework team are aware of the issues behind this (something involving the DIC) and already have plans to work on it in the future.

And he’s completely right [about it being premature to report benchmarks on a pre-stable release]. This benchmark was meant purely to see if the article from piprime.fr made any sense. And it’s a starting point for me to see what you can do with the different optimizations and what their performance impact is.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17585

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Enrise Blog: Zend Framework 2 Performance

Enrise Blog: Zend Framework 2 Performance

On the Enrise blog Tim de Pater has done some benchmarking of some Zend Framework-based applications, comparing the performance of a Zend Framework 1 application to that of a Zend Framework 2 app.

A few days ago I read an article that compared some frameworks. Amongst others, both Zend Framework 1 and Zend Framework 2 were included. What struck me was that ZF2 was 5 times slower then ZF1. I know, it’s in beta, not yet optimized for production use. But I couldn’t believe the difference was so great. So I’ve tested it myself and want to share my results in this blog.

Included in the post are the specs for the machine he used (the host machine and the VirtualBox instances), the versions of ZF he used (1.11.1 and the latest from ZF2) and a script that uses ApacheBench to perform the testing. His testing involved benchmarking the requests per second that each application was able to perform. In all cases the ZF2 performance was slower (consistently) by a factor of about four times. The Zend Framework team are aware of the issues behind this (something involving the DIC) and already have plans to work on it in the future.

And he’s completely right [about it being premature to report benchmarks on a pre-stable release]. This benchmark was meant purely to see if the article from piprime.fr made any sense. And it’s a starting point for me to see what you can do with the different optimizations and what their performance impact is.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17585

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Marcelo Gornstein’s Blog: Dependency injection with Xml and Yaml in the Ding container

Marcelo Gornstein’s Blog: Dependency injection with Xml and Yaml in the Ding container

In this new post to his blog today Marcelo Gornstein looks at doing some dependency injection in a simple application via XML and YAML configurations and the Ding dependency injection container.

In this past article I’ve discussed the dependency injection features when using annotations. This time, we’ll see how to use the xml and yaml drivers to do the same (setter and constructor injection). If you don’t know how to configure the xml and yaml drivers, please start by reading this.

He describes the different injection methods available with the container – setter injection, constructor injection and method injection. Example configuration content is included – both the XML and YAML versions.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17584

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Marcelo Gornstein’s Blog: Dependency injection with Xml and Yaml in the Ding container

Marcelo Gornstein’s Blog: Dependency injection with Xml and Yaml in the Ding container

In this new post to his blog today Marcelo Gornstein looks at doing some dependency injection in a simple application via XML and YAML configurations and the Ding dependency injection container.

In this past article I’ve discussed the dependency injection features when using annotations. This time, we’ll see how to use the xml and yaml drivers to do the same (setter and constructor injection). If you don’t know how to configure the xml and yaml drivers, please start by reading this.

He describes the different injection methods available with the container – setter injection, constructor injection and method injection. Example configuration content is included – both the XML and YAML versions.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17584

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>