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Archive for Listopad, 2011

Ibuildings techPortal: DPC Radio: Distributed Couch Apps – Embracing eventual consistency

Ibuildings techPortal: DPC Radio: Distributed Couch Apps – Embracing eventual consistency

On the Ibuildings techPortal today they’ve posted the latest episode of their DPC Radio series of podcasts, recordings of sessions from this year’s Dutch PHP Conference. In this new episode they share the presentation by Kore Nordmann “Distributed Couch Apps – Embracing eventual consistency”.

CouchDB is a prominent representative of the NoSQL movement. Using its integrated web server and eventual consistent replication you can not only distribute data, but also full application code. This even works for clients which are not always connected to the internet, like e.g. mobile devices. This session gives you an insight Couch apps, their beauty and pitfalls.

You can either listen via the in-page player, by downloading the mp3 or by subscribing to their feed. You can find his slides over on talks.qafoo.com.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17155

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Ibuildings techPortal: DPC Radio: Distributed Couch Apps – Embracing eventual consistency

Ibuildings techPortal: DPC Radio: Distributed Couch Apps – Embracing eventual consistency

On the Ibuildings techPortal today they’ve posted the latest episode of their DPC Radio series of podcasts, recordings of sessions from this year’s Dutch PHP Conference. In this new episode they share the presentation by Kore Nordmann “Distributed Couch Apps – Embracing eventual consistency”.

CouchDB is a prominent representative of the NoSQL movement. Using its integrated web server and eventual consistent replication you can not only distribute data, but also full application code. This even works for clients which are not always connected to the internet, like e.g. mobile devices. This session gives you an insight Couch apps, their beauty and pitfalls.

You can either listen via the in-page player, by downloading the mp3 or by subscribing to their feed. You can find his slides over on talks.qafoo.com.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17155

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

PHPBuilder.com: Talking to Facebook’s Social Graph with PHP

PHPBuilder.com: Talking to Facebook’s Social Graph with PHP

On PHPBuilder.com there’s a recent post showing you how to connect your application with Facebook’s graph API and grabbing the current user’s public profile information.

In recent years, [Facebook's] influence has dramatically grown thanks to the Facebook Platform, a set of APIs which third-parties can use to create or extend applications which tightly integrate with Facebook.com’s features and users. [...] PHP-minded developers are particularly fortunate, as the Facebook PHP SDK doesn’t only provide users a powerful solution for interacting with the social graph, but because it’s actively maintained by the Facebook development team is often the first of several available APIs to offer the latest features and bug fixes.

He points out the github repostory for grabbing the Facebook SDK, the information you’d get (at a minimum) from the API and the sort of detail you can expect from a user logged into your application. Sample code is included for this last example.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17154

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

PHPBuilder.com: Talking to Facebook’s Social Graph with PHP

PHPBuilder.com: Talking to Facebook’s Social Graph with PHP

On PHPBuilder.com there’s a recent post showing you how to connect your application with Facebook’s graph API and grabbing the current user’s public profile information.

In recent years, [Facebook's] influence has dramatically grown thanks to the Facebook Platform, a set of APIs which third-parties can use to create or extend applications which tightly integrate with Facebook.com’s features and users. [...] PHP-minded developers are particularly fortunate, as the Facebook PHP SDK doesn’t only provide users a powerful solution for interacting with the social graph, but because it’s actively maintained by the Facebook development team is often the first of several available APIs to offer the latest features and bug fixes.

He points out the github repostory for grabbing the Facebook SDK, the information you’d get (at a minimum) from the API and the sort of detail you can expect from a user logged into your application. Sample code is included for this last example.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17154

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

PHPMaster.com: Localizing PHP Applications "The Right Way", Part 4

PHPMaster.com: Localizing PHP Applications "The Right Way", Part 4

In the latest installment of their “Localizing PHP Applications ‘The Right Way’” tutorial series (part four), they show off a feature of gettext that makes it simpler to deal with singular versus plural versions of your translations.

In Part 3 you learned some of the more important aspects of real-world localizing your application, such as using a default fallback locale and separating messages into multiple domain files depending on their usage. In this part I’ll show you what is arguably the most powerful feature of gettext – handling plural forms. The plural forms feature of gettext you enable you to localize your application perfectly and professionally.

The simple example they give is the difference between things like “1 file” versus “2 files”. English is simpler than some other languages but gettext has special handling you can add to your translation files to help. A rule placed at the top of your file defines where to start the singular vs plural switch.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17153

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

PHPMaster.com: Localizing PHP Applications "The Right Way", Part 4

PHPMaster.com: Localizing PHP Applications "The Right Way", Part 4

In the latest installment of their “Localizing PHP Applications ‘The Right Way’” tutorial series (part four), they show off a feature of gettext that makes it simpler to deal with singular versus plural versions of your translations.

In Part 3 you learned some of the more important aspects of real-world localizing your application, such as using a default fallback locale and separating messages into multiple domain files depending on their usage. In this part I’ll show you what is arguably the most powerful feature of gettext – handling plural forms. The plural forms feature of gettext you enable you to localize your application perfectly and professionally.

The simple example they give is the difference between things like “1 file” versus “2 files”. English is simpler than some other languages but gettext has special handling you can add to your translation files to help. A rule placed at the top of your file defines where to start the singular vs plural switch.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17153

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Kevin Schroeder’s Blog: Connecting to the Zend Developer Cloud with PHPStorm

Kevin Schroeder’s Blog: Connecting to the Zend Developer Cloud with PHPStorm

A few days ago Kevin Schroeder showed how to connect the Zend cloud services with the Zend Studio IDE. In this new post he shows how to connect another popular IDE – PHPStorm.

Just because you want to use the Zend Developer Cloud at phpcloud.com doesn’t mean that you necessarily use Zend Studio. While I may wonder why you don’t use Zend Studio ( :-) ) I know there are a lot of other good IDE’s on the market and an IDE like PHPStorm might suit how you do your development.

He walks you through the whole process, complete with screenshots – creating the project on phpcloud, cloning your git repo there, configure PHPStorm for deployment (via SFTP) and set up a little path mapping.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17152

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Kevin Schroeder’s Blog: Connecting to the Zend Developer Cloud with PHPStorm

Kevin Schroeder’s Blog: Connecting to the Zend Developer Cloud with PHPStorm

A few days ago Kevin Schroeder showed how to connect the Zend cloud services with the Zend Studio IDE. In this new post he shows how to connect another popular IDE – PHPStorm.

Just because you want to use the Zend Developer Cloud at phpcloud.com doesn’t mean that you necessarily use Zend Studio. While I may wonder why you don’t use Zend Studio ( :-) ) I know there are a lot of other good IDE’s on the market and an IDE like PHPStorm might suit how you do your development.

He walks you through the whole process, complete with screenshots – creating the project on phpcloud, cloning your git repo there, configure PHPStorm for deployment (via SFTP) and set up a little path mapping.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17152

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Derick Rethans’ Blog: Twig extension

Derick Rethans’ Blog: Twig extension

In a new post from Derick Rethans he talks about an extension version of Twig, the popular templating engine from the creators of the Symfony framework.

A while ago, Fabien asked me to have a look at porting one of Twig’s slowest methods, TwigTemplate::getAttribute(), into a PHP extension. It is a complex method that does a lot of different checks and look-ups. Fabien’s benchmarks showed that this method was responsible for quite a large amount of time. On top of that, it didn’t seem that it could be optimised any further as PHP code itself.

He points to the twig-ext extension that’s a reworked version of the “getAttribute” method from the tool and the performance gain (about 15%) it gives. Compiled templates will automatically call this new method in the extension. This update has already been merged into the main Twig repo.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17151

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Derick Rethans’ Blog: Twig extension

Derick Rethans’ Blog: Twig extension

In a new post from Derick Rethans he talks about an extension version of Twig, the popular templating engine from the creators of the Symfony framework.

A while ago, Fabien asked me to have a look at porting one of Twig’s slowest methods, TwigTemplate::getAttribute(), into a PHP extension. It is a complex method that does a lot of different checks and look-ups. Fabien’s benchmarks showed that this method was responsible for quite a large amount of time. On top of that, it didn’t seem that it could be optimised any further as PHP code itself.

He points to the twig-ext extension that’s a reworked version of the “getAttribute” method from the tool and the performance gain (about 15%) it gives. Compiled templates will automatically call this new method in the extension. This update has already been merged into the main Twig repo.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17151

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>