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Archive for Październik, 2011

Community News: CakePHP 2.0 Released (with some Major Changes)

Community News: CakePHP 2.0 Released (with some Major Changes)

The Bakery (a CakePHP site) has announced the release of CakePHP 2.0, a major shift in the framework with some very large changes to bring it up to the level of other full-stack frameworks currently offered for PHP.

The CakePHP core team is very exited to announce a major jump in the version numbering. CakePHP 2.0 stable is out! we have put endless hours into this release and great ideas have made it into the the framework for this version. [...] The overall CakePHP ecosystem has also been improved. [...] A huge thanks to all involved in terms of both contributions through commits, tickets, documentation edits, and otherwise contribute to the framework. Without you there would be no CakePHP.

Some huge changes have happened in this release including:

  • Dropping PHP4 support
  • Use of more native PHP functions
  • PSR-0 compliance
  • Object injection for libraries/components/helpers/etc
  • Console tools completely rebuilt
  • A move to PHPUnit tests (away from SimpleUnit)
  • HTML support in form helpers
  • Lazy-loading on just about everything making the overall experience faster
  • Several new plugins like: DebugKit, Datasources, MongoDb, Migrations and AclExtras

They’ve created a few resources to help you get started with this new version including a new version of the book, a screencast and a migration guide.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17027

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var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
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Adam Patterson’s Blog: DIY simple staging server.

Adam Patterson’s Blog: DIY simple staging server.

Adam Peterson has posted an interesting idea for those out there running an internal staging server they want to constantly keep up to date with the main line of code (without manual intervention) – a git pull web frontend combined with git post-receive hooks.

This [move from svn to git] left a bit of a gap in my process where I could no longer test on a remote server without updating it manually by S/FTP or opening terminal and manually calling a git pull. Open terminal and manually git pull it did break up the work flow a bit so using the Dingo framework I created a very simple Git helper and gave it its own URL something like git/pull.

He added a post-receive hook to his git server that calls this “git/pull” URL on the staging server and updates the code on the server. This provides an easy asynchronous way to update things on another server. Note, though, that this should never be done on a publicly accessible server – it’s a pretty large security hole (or at the very least made secure somehow). He used Dingo to create his interface, but something like the Slim micro-framework could have worked just as well. You can view his code on github.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17026

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Community News: CakePHP 2.0 Released (with some Major Changes)

Community News: CakePHP 2.0 Released (with some Major Changes)

The Bakery (a CakePHP site) has announced the release of CakePHP 2.0, a major shift in the framework with some very large changes to bring it up to the level of other full-stack frameworks currently offered for PHP.

The CakePHP core team is very exited to announce a major jump in the version numbering. CakePHP 2.0 stable is out! we have put endless hours into this release and great ideas have made it into the the framework for this version. [...] The overall CakePHP ecosystem has also been improved. [...] A huge thanks to all involved in terms of both contributions through commits, tickets, documentation edits, and otherwise contribute to the framework. Without you there would be no CakePHP.

Some huge changes have happened in this release including:

  • Dropping PHP4 support
  • Use of more native PHP functions
  • PSR-0 compliance
  • Object injection for libraries/components/helpers/etc
  • Console tools completely rebuilt
  • A move to PHPUnit tests (away from SimpleUnit)
  • HTML support in form helpers
  • Lazy-loading on just about everything making the overall experience faster
  • Several new plugins like: DebugKit, Datasources, MongoDb, Migrations and AclExtras

They’ve created a few resources to help you get started with this new version including a new version of the book, a screencast and a migration guide.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17027

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

SitePoint Blog: Book Release – "PHP Master: Write Cutting-Edge PHP Code"

SitePoint Blog: Book Release – "PHP Master: Write Cutting-Edge PHP Code"

As is mentioned in this new post to the SitePoint blogs, a new book has been released (by SitePoint press, naturally) about “writing cutting-edge PHP code” by a few well known authors in the PHP community – Lorna Mitchell, Davey Shafik and Matthew Turland.

Savvy PHP web developers can now keep ahead of the game and ensure that their PHP code is safe, secure, and well-structured for the future with the latest release from SitePoint: “PHP Master: Write Cutting-edge Code”
by Lorna Mitchell, Davey Shafik, and Matthew Turland.

The book covers a wide range of topics (somewhat replacing SitePoint’s usual “anthology” type of book) including:

  • An introduction to OOP
  • Working with databases
  • Creating and working with APIs
  • Design patterns
  • Security
  • Automated testing

As part of a special offer, you can pick up your print+ebook bundle for the price of just the book, about $40 USD. If you’d like a sample before purchasing, they’ve posted three sample chapters.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17025

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Adam Patterson’s Blog: DIY simple staging server.

Adam Patterson’s Blog: DIY simple staging server.

Adam Peterson has posted an interesting idea for those out there running an internal staging server they want to constantly keep up to date with the main line of code (without manual intervention) – a git pull web frontend combined with git post-receive hooks.

This [move from svn to git] left a bit of a gap in my process where I could no longer test on a remote server without updating it manually by S/FTP or opening terminal and manually calling a git pull. Open terminal and manually git pull it did break up the work flow a bit so using the Dingo framework I created a very simple Git helper and gave it its own URL something like git/pull.

He added a post-receive hook to his git server that calls this “git/pull” URL on the staging server and updates the code on the server. This provides an easy asynchronous way to update things on another server. Note, though, that this should never be done on a publicly accessible server – it’s a pretty large security hole (or at the very least made secure somehow). He used Dingo to create his interface, but something like the Slim micro-framework could have worked just as well. You can view his code on github.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17026

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Brian Swan’s Blog: Using SQL Azure to Store PHP Session Data

Brian Swan’s Blog: Using SQL Azure to Store PHP Session Data

In a recent post to his blog Brian Swan takes a look at working with sessions in PHP and, specifically, how to save them to Azure along with all of their data.

In my last post, I looked at the session handling functionality that is built into the Windows Azure SDK for PHP, which uses Azure Tables or Azure Blobs for storing session data. As I wrote that post, I wondered how easy it would be to use SQL Azure to store session data, especially since using a database to store session data is a common and familiar practice when building distributed PHP applications. As I found out, using SQL Azure to store session data was relatively easy (as I’ll show in this post), but I did run into a couple of small hurdles that might be worth taking note of.

He uses PHP’s own session_set_save_handler to point to his custom Azure handling class with the needed methods (like write, close and destroy). He breaks it out into three simple steps, some with a bit of code attached:

  • Create the database, table, and stored procedure
  • Add the SqlAzureSessionHandler class to your project
  • Instantiate SqlAzureSessionHandler before calling session functions as you normally would

The code for the Azure handling class can be downloaded here.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17024

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

SitePoint Blog: Book Release – "PHP Master: Write Cutting-Edge PHP Code"

SitePoint Blog: Book Release – "PHP Master: Write Cutting-Edge PHP Code"

As is mentioned in this new post to the SitePoint blogs, a new book has been released (by SitePoint press, naturally) about “writing cutting-edge PHP code” by a few well known authors in the PHP community – Lorna Mitchell, Davey Shafik and Matthew Turland.

Savvy PHP web developers can now keep ahead of the game and ensure that their PHP code is safe, secure, and well-structured for the future with the latest release from SitePoint: “PHP Master: Write Cutting-edge Code”
by Lorna Mitchell, Davey Shafik, and Matthew Turland.

The book covers a wide range of topics (somewhat replacing SitePoint’s usual “anthology” type of book) including:

  • An introduction to OOP
  • Working with databases
  • Creating and working with APIs
  • Design patterns
  • Security
  • Automated testing

As part of a special offer, you can pick up your print+ebook bundle for the price of just the book, about $40 USD. If you’d like a sample before purchasing, they’ve posted three sample chapters.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17025

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Brian Swan’s Blog: Using SQL Azure to Store PHP Session Data

Brian Swan’s Blog: Using SQL Azure to Store PHP Session Data

In a recent post to his blog Brian Swan takes a look at working with sessions in PHP and, specifically, how to save them to Azure along with all of their data.

In my last post, I looked at the session handling functionality that is built into the Windows Azure SDK for PHP, which uses Azure Tables or Azure Blobs for storing session data. As I wrote that post, I wondered how easy it would be to use SQL Azure to store session data, especially since using a database to store session data is a common and familiar practice when building distributed PHP applications. As I found out, using SQL Azure to store session data was relatively easy (as I’ll show in this post), but I did run into a couple of small hurdles that might be worth taking note of.

He uses PHP’s own session_set_save_handler to point to his custom Azure handling class with the needed methods (like write, close and destroy). He breaks it out into three simple steps, some with a bit of code attached:

  • Create the database, table, and stored procedure
  • Add the SqlAzureSessionHandler class to your project
  • Instantiate SqlAzureSessionHandler before calling session functions as you normally would

The code for the Azure handling class can be downloaded here.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17024

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 10.21.2011

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 10.21.2011Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17023

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 10.21.2011

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 10.21.2011Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/17023

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>