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Archive for Wrzesień, 2011

Announcing September’s Zend Framework Bug Hunt Days

Announcing September’s Zend Framework Bug Hunt DaysFor those who haven’t put the recurring event in their calendar, the Zend
Framework Monthly Bug-hunt is here again! This Thursday, Friday and Saturday
(the 22nd, 23rd and 24th of September), we’ll be hosting our monthly bug hunt. For
those of you unfamiliar with the event, each month, we organize the community to
help reduce the number of open issues reported against the framework.


Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ZendDeveloperZone/~3/LBZNvc-GK0U/17208-Announcing-Septembers-Zend-Framework-Bug-Hunt-Days

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Lukas Smith’s Blog: My PHP framework winner predictions

Lukas Smith’s Blog: My PHP framework winner predictions

Lukas Smith has posted some of his thoughts on who the framework winners are right now and which might pull ahead in the future including Symfony and Zend Framework.

I have not been that active on the conference scene in the past few years, but the ones where I did attend I also tried to take a peek at what others are doing. Also this post is kind of exploratory to see what other people think, hopefully without inviting a flame fest upon myself. So with this disclaimer out of the way, I think the big 3 frameworks for the next few years will be Lithium, Zend Framework 2 and Symfony2.

He looks at each of his “winners” and explains his rationale behind their selection including community support, features offered and the overall structure and feel of the framework. He mentions two other interesting frameworks of note that have come out of other projects – Flow3 and Nooku. Comments on the post suggest even more frameworks to look to in the future including Yii and mentions of Nette and CodeIgniter.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16883

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Davey Shafik’s Blog: DateTime Timestamp Parsing

Davey Shafik’s Blog: DateTime Timestamp Parsing

In a new post to his blog Davey Shafik looks at parsing dates with DateTime, the new and improved way to handle dates in PHP (well, not so new but definitely improved).

As part of a recent project, I was tasked with taking timestamps returned by an API and displaying fuzzy dates in the final output (e.g. 3hrs ago, in 2 weeks, tomorrow). The timestamp format in question looks like: 2012-09-01T16:20:01-05:00 This format can be found in PHP as the DATE_ATOM or DateTime::ATOM constants, which contain the date() formatter string: Y-m-dTH:i:sP With this in hand, we can now easily parse the timestamp into a useful object.

Parsing the date into a DateTime object is as easy as giving it the date string and telling it how it’s formatted. Then you can do all sorts of fun things. He shows how to shift the timezone by name, by time increment – simple (like “1 hour”) and more complex (like “1 hour 5 minutes 3 seconds”). You can find out more about the DateTime object in the PHP manual.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16882

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Liip Blog: Easily Test PHP 5.4 Beta on OS X with PHP-OSX

Liip Blog: Easily Test PHP 5.4 Beta on OS X with PHP-OSX

Christian Stocker has a quick new post on the Liip blog today about an easy way to test the PHP 5.4 beta on your OS X-based platform with a simple package install and symlink.

Since the first beta of the next major release of PHP was released a few days ago, I thought we could provide packages for people who’d like to test it and see if there software is still running. And make adjustments or report bugs, if it doesn’t. Complaining after the official stable release was made is usually too late, so testing your software against beta releases is very important. For your project and for PHP.

The install involves grabbing their package from the Liip server and calling the “packager.py” executable to make the version swap. You can go back to the pre-installed PHP5 version anytime by updating the symlink back. If you want more information on the package (or to report bugs) you can find the project over in github.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16881

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Ralph Schindler’s Blog: Autoloading (Revisited)

Ralph Schindler’s Blog: Autoloading (Revisited)

Ralph Schindler has a new post to his today looking back at a sort of history of autoloading and some of what we’ve learned even in just the journey from PHP 5.0 to 5.3 (and has become best practice in the community).

It wasn’t until years later that certain best practices had emerged and the prolific usage of require_once/include_once throughout large bodies of code had started drying up. Even after autoloading had been adopted by larger more visible projects, a common patten had yet to emerge. [...] Fast-forward to today, and we see that this standard for autoloading has agreed upon by a large number of projects and has come to be named the “PSR-0 autoloading standard”.

He covers some of the things we (the development community) have learned about autoloading and resources in our applications. He talks about the classmap tool that Matthew Weier O’Phinney developed (and some of its downfalls) as well as a move into PHP namespacing that has helped to make some of the “namespacing” based on class names obsolete. He’s noticed a pattern in namespacing already – a self-contained structure that provides more of a “drop in” solution and how that’s handled in the code.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16880

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PHPMaster.com: Introduction to PHP Arrays

PHPMaster.com: Introduction to PHP Arrays

On the PHPMaster.com site today, there’s a good introduction to a basic data type in PHP – working with arrays. This tutorial is a low level look at what arrays are and how to work with them (briefly).

Tables organize data in such a way that we can easily find correlations or perform straightforward computations. A array is essentially a way to organize data in a table-like manner. The name “array” comes from the same Latin roots as the word “arrangement.”

If you’re anything other than completely new to the language, this post won’t help you much. If you’re new to programming, though, learning about arrays in PHP is key to your budding development skills. For more in-depth looks at using arrays, checkout these results.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16879

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Community News: Latest PECL Releases for 09.20.2011

Community News: Latest PECL Releases for 09.20.2011Latest PECL Releases:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16878

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Artur Ejsmont’s Blog: How to properly secure remote API calls over SSL from PHP code

Artur Ejsmont’s Blog: How to properly secure remote API calls over SSL from PHP code

Artur Ejsmont has a new post with a passionate call to arms for anyone who thinks that just because their URL has “https” in it, it’s secure. He presents his suggestion on how to properly secure SSL API calls for your PHP application.

Lets make something clear from the very start: JUST BECAUSE THERE IS https:// IN THE URL OF THE REMOTE SERVICE IT DOES NOT MEAN THE CONNECTION IS SECURE! I am sorry for the tone of this post but i am enraged by how popular this issue is online. If you ask why i suggest a little experiment [involving changing your hosts file and using a self-signed certificate].

The issue he spotlights is all too common – a server serves up SSL pages but doesn’t actually verify the certificate in the process. He gives a bad example of how some scripts handle this issue using the CURLOPT_SSL_VERIFYPEER and CURLOPT_SSL_VERIFYHOST to turn off this verification – a very bad idea. To protect yourself from any kind of man-in-the-middle or DNS hijack issues, you should leave these on.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16877

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PHPBuilder.com: Transfer Data via Multiple Protocols with Libcurl

PHPBuilder.com: Transfer Data via Multiple Protocols with Libcurl

On PHPBuilder.com today there’s a new tutorial showing how to use libcurl to communicate with multiple protocols like FTP, HTTP, HTTPS, SMTP and STMPS. The libcurl library that can be compiled in or installed as a shared module in your PHP install to provide enhanced networking abilities.

As I wrote in my PHP multithreading with cURL article, the libcurl is a free and easy-to-use client-side URL transfer library, supporting DICT, FILE, FTP, FTPS, GOPHER, HTTP, HTTPS, IMAP, IMAPS, LDAP, LDAPS, POP3, POP3S, RTMP, RTSP, SCP, SFTP, SMTP, SMTPS, TELNET and TFTP. PHP supports the libcurl library which allows you to connect and communicate to many different types of servers with many different types of protocols.

The tutorial focuses on two different types of connections (well, four really) – FTP/FTPS and HTTP/HTTPS – and how to transfer data across each. Some code is included to create a (procedural) tool to send an uploaded file to a remote site.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16876

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PHPMaster.com: PHP is Moving to Git (Eventually)

PHPMaster.com: PHP is Moving to Git (Eventually)

Recently the PHP project announced a move to git as the primary version control system for the language’s development. In a new post to SitePoint’s PHPMaster.com site, Davey Shafik explains what that means to the average developer and what you can expect of the future.

Just over two years since its move from the antiquated CVS to Subversion (SVN), PHP is once again on the move: this time, to Git. Well, eventually. The migration from CVS to SVN was a huge one and took many months. The need for the PHP project to support its user base, hook scripts (commit mailing list, etc.) means that any change of revision control software means quite a large commitment. This is why even though the voting is over, and the dust has settled, we won’t be seeing PHP on Git until the end of this year.

Davey shares his vote – pro-git – and explains what his choice (and many others’) means for the language, including a modified patch acceptance policy and a convenience for developers to be able to work anywhere.

All in all, I feel migrating from Subversion to Git can only be a good thing for the PHP project and the community as a whole. [...] it is pretty clear that the PHP development community is in favor of the decision.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16875

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