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Archive for Lipiec, 2011

Announcing July’s Zend Framework Bug Hunt Days

Announcing July’s Zend Framework Bug Hunt DaysFor those who haven’t put the recurring event in their calendar, the Zend
Framework Monthly Bug-hunt is here again! This Thursday, Friday and Saturday
(the 28th, 29th and 30th of July), we’ll be hosting our monthly bug hunt. For
those of you unfamiliar with the event, each month, we organize the community to
help reduce the number of open issues reported against the framework.


Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ZendDeveloperZone/~3/OnBAILPp4WI/16578-Announcing-Julys-Zend-Framework-Bug-Hunt-Days

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Community News: Latest PECL Releases for 07.26.2011

Community News: Latest PECL Releases for 07.26.2011Latest PECL Releases:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16630

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Community News: Latest PECL Releases for 07.26.2011

Community News: Latest PECL Releases for 07.26.2011Latest PECL Releases:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16630

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Robert Basic’s Blog: Debugging Zend Framework unit tests with Xdebug and NetBeans

Robert Basic’s Blog: Debugging Zend Framework unit tests with Xdebug and NetBeans

In this quick post today Robert Basic shares a hint for using Xdebug together with Zend Framework unit tests to get effective results.

I’ve spent this weekend hacking on some unit tests for ZendDojo and I ran into an issue where I need Xdebug to, well, debug. Note, that this is not for debugging a Zend Framework application, but for debugging Zend Framework itself. I am using Netbeans + Xdebug to debug regular code, but debugging unit tests was something completely new for me. Turns out, it’s not entirely different from “regular” debugging.

Thanks to hints from this post and some trial and error on working with autoloading, he finally got things working in his Netbeans environment. The trick is setting up the “Index File” to the correct location.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16629

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Robert Basic’s Blog: Debugging Zend Framework unit tests with Xdebug and NetBeans

Robert Basic’s Blog: Debugging Zend Framework unit tests with Xdebug and NetBeans

In this quick post today Robert Basic shares a hint for using Xdebug together with Zend Framework unit tests to get effective results.

I’ve spent this weekend hacking on some unit tests for ZendDojo and I ran into an issue where I need Xdebug to, well, debug. Note, that this is not for debugging a Zend Framework application, but for debugging Zend Framework itself. I am using Netbeans + Xdebug to debug regular code, but debugging unit tests was something completely new for me. Turns out, it’s not entirely different from “regular” debugging.

Thanks to hints from this post and some trial and error on working with autoloading, he finally got things working in his Netbeans environment. The trick is setting up the “Index File” to the correct location.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16629

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Rob Allen’s Blog: Setting up PHP & MySQL on OS X 10.7 Lion

Rob Allen’s Blog: Setting up PHP & MySQL on OS X 10.7 Lion

Rob Allen has posted his own guide to getting PHP 5.3 set up on OS X 10.7 Lion, the just-released update for Apple’s operating system. It comes with a bundled set of PHP-related tools but you might want to set them up your own way. This is where the guide comes in.

With OS X 10.7, Apple continues to ship PHP 5.3 with PEAR, GD and PDO_MYSQL out of the box. This is how to set it up from a clean install of 10.7.

He goes through each of the pieces of software and talks about where to download the latest from and what configuration steps are needed:

  • MySQL
  • Apache
  • the php.ini
  • Xdebug
  • PEAR
  • PHPUnit (and friends)
  • PECL OAuth
  • mcrypt

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16628

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Rob Allen’s Blog: Setting up PHP & MySQL on OS X 10.7 Lion

Rob Allen’s Blog: Setting up PHP & MySQL on OS X 10.7 Lion

Rob Allen has posted his own guide to getting PHP 5.3 set up on OS X 10.7 Lion, the just-released update for Apple’s operating system. It comes with a bundled set of PHP-related tools but you might want to set them up your own way. This is where the guide comes in.

With OS X 10.7, Apple continues to ship PHP 5.3 with PEAR, GD and PDO_MYSQL out of the box. This is how to set it up from a clean install of 10.7.

He goes through each of the pieces of software and talks about where to download the latest from and what configuration steps are needed:

  • MySQL
  • Apache
  • the php.ini
  • Xdebug
  • PEAR
  • PHPUnit (and friends)
  • PECL OAuth
  • mcrypt

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16628

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Gonzalo Ayuso’s Blog: Using node.js to store PHP sessions

Gonzalo Ayuso’s Blog: Using node.js to store PHP sessions

Gonzalo Ayuso has an interesting new post today looking at how to go cross-technology in your application and store your PHP sessions in a basic Node.js instance.

We use sessions when we want to preserve certain data across subsequent accesses. PHP allows us to use different handlers when we’re using sessions. The default one is filesystem, but we can change it with session.save_handler in the php.ini. session.save_handler defines the name of the handler which is used for storing and retrieving data associated with a session. We also can create our own handler to manage sessions. In this post we’re going to create a custom handler to store sessions in a node.js service.

He includes the full code you’ll need (also here on github) to make a custom session handling class on the PHP side and some simple unit tests done on the Node.js side to ensure for proper handling and garbage collection.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16627

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Gonzalo Ayuso’s Blog: Using node.js to store PHP sessions

Gonzalo Ayuso’s Blog: Using node.js to store PHP sessions

Gonzalo Ayuso has an interesting new post today looking at how to go cross-technology in your application and store your PHP sessions in a basic Node.js instance.

We use sessions when we want to preserve certain data across subsequent accesses. PHP allows us to use different handlers when we’re using sessions. The default one is filesystem, but we can change it with session.save_handler in the php.ini. session.save_handler defines the name of the handler which is used for storing and retrieving data associated with a session. We also can create our own handler to manage sessions. In this post we’re going to create a custom handler to store sessions in a node.js service.

He includes the full code you’ll need (also here on github) to make a custom session handling class on the PHP side and some simple unit tests done on the Node.js side to ensure for proper handling and garbage collection.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16627

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Philip Norton’s Blog: PHPUnit Skeleton Classes

Philip Norton’s Blog: PHPUnit Skeleton Classes

In this new post to his blog, Philip Norton reminds you about a handy feature of PHPUnit, the popular PHP unit testing tool, that can make generating tests for your application simpler – the skeleton class generator.

If you create classes in PHP then you should be unit testing them as much as you can. Setting up unit testing classes for your code can be time consuming and involve a bunch of copying and pasting. Thankfully, PHPUnit comes with a couple of helper functions that allow the creation of unit testing classes automatically, which can save a bit of copying and pasting.

He includes an example of a class named “Spider” and shows both the contents of the class and the resulting test that comes from running “phpunit –skeleton-test” on it. The resulting test has methods for each method in your class and marks them all as incomplete. As Philip notes, this is a good start but should never be relied upon as a test to leave as-is.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16626

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