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Archive for Lipiec, 2011

RubySource.com: Confessions of a Converted PHP Developer: Namespace Superhero!

RubySource.com: Confessions of a Converted PHP Developer: Namespace Superhero!

RubySource.com has posted another in their “confessions of a converted PHP developer” series (more here) with a new article comparing namespacing between the two languages.

The moment you start writing code that grows beyond a few classes, you start to realise that you need a way to group files and logic. While this is easy to do, it can become quite difficult to ensure that you have class names that are unique and don’t end up accidentally clashing with other classes in your own code, or classes in other people’s code that you are using.

He talks about PHP’s namespacing, a relatively recent addition, and how pre-5.3 “pseudo-namespacing” was done through class and directory names with autoloading. He compares this to Ruby’s module support that provides a sort of built in namespacing support. He includes a multiple namespace Ruby example and shows how to nest modules for even more fine-grained separation.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16654

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RubySource.com: Confessions of a Converted PHP Developer: Namespace Superhero!

RubySource.com: Confessions of a Converted PHP Developer: Namespace Superhero!

RubySource.com has posted another in their “confessions of a converted PHP developer” series (more here) with a new article comparing namespacing between the two languages.

The moment you start writing code that grows beyond a few classes, you start to realise that you need a way to group files and logic. While this is easy to do, it can become quite difficult to ensure that you have class names that are unique and don’t end up accidentally clashing with other classes in your own code, or classes in other people’s code that you are using.

He talks about PHP’s namespacing, a relatively recent addition, and how pre-5.3 “pseudo-namespacing” was done through class and directory names with autoloading. He compares this to Ruby’s module support that provides a sort of built in namespacing support. He includes a multiple namespace Ruby example and shows how to nest modules for even more fine-grained separation.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16655

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var d = new Date();
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PHPBuilder.com: Build Blazing Fast PHP Websites with Memcached Distributed Caching

PHPBuilder.com: Build Blazing Fast PHP Websites with Memcached Distributed Caching

On PHPBuilder.com today Jason Gilmore has written up a new tutorial about using memcached distributed caching for better performance in your web applications.

You probably know one of the easiest ways to improve performance is by caching all or parts of a page. But what might not be so obvious is exactly how this is accomplished. As it happens, a great solution called Memcached makes it trivial to incorporate caching into your website with great effect. In fact, relied upon by some of the largest websites in the world, among them Facebook, Twitter, Zynga, and YouTube, Memcached has essentially become the de facto website caching solution!

He walks you through installing the memcache extension for PHP (from PECL) and includes a bit of sample code that caches some fetched MySQL results to to the memcache server. With the extension installed you’re just a few simple function calls away from better performance.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16653

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Robert Basic’s Blog: Helping out with Zend Framework 2

Robert Basic’s Blog: Helping out with Zend Framework 2

For anyone looking to get started helping on the Zend Framework 2 project but not sure where to begin, Robert Basic has some recommendations of places to look.

OK, here are some tips and resources so you can start helping out and contributing to Zend Framework 2.0.

Things on the list include:

  • a getting started page on the ZF wiki
  • Fixing unit tests on the framework
  • working on the port of ZendService
  • Porting patches from ZF1 to ZF2
  • Check out the quickstart on github to get the ball rolling

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16652

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Maarten Balliauw’s Blog: Windows Azure SDK for PHP 4 released

Maarten Balliauw’s Blog: Windows Azure SDK for PHP 4 released

Maarten Balliauw has a new post announcing the release of the latest Windows SDK for Azure for PHP, version 4.

The Windows Azure SDK 4 contains some significant feature enhancements. For example, it now incorporates a PHP library for accessing Windows Azure storage, a logging component, a session sharing component and clients for both the Windows Azure and SQL Azure Management API’s. On top of that, all of these API’s are now also available from the command-line both under Windows and Linux. This means you can batch-script a complete datacenter setup including servers, storage, SQL Azure, firewalls, … If that’s not cool, move to the North Pole.

He includes a few things from the changelog including service management API support for SQL Azure, package scaffolders and various performance enhancements. You can find out more about the release and the latest on the project on the Microsoft Interoperability website.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16651

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Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 07.29.2011

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 07.29.2011Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16650

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Anthony Wlodarskis Blog: Authentication with Node.js and Zend Framework

Anthony Wlodarskis Blog: Authentication with Node.js and Zend Framework

Anthony Wlodarski has put together a new post to his blog talking about authenticating a Zend Framework app against Node.js with the help of the Socket.io component for handling credentials.

Zend Framework which is PHP based and Node.js which is JavaScript based don’t have a common connection to pass data in a bi-directional nature. I was tasked with building a bridge of sorts that would utilize existing information from Zend Framework with the latest release of Socket.io’s authorization mechanisms. (If you don’t do this then arbitrary connections can happen and will be authorized.)

He starts with the code (on the Node.js side) to create a simple HTTP server to listen for the requests from the Zend Framework application. He gets into the details of how that all works before moving to the other side – a simple update to the authentication to store a session cookie with the information that is passed, via Socket.io to the waiting Node.js server for handling.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16649

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Lorna Mitchell’s Blog:

Lorna Mitchell’s Blog:

Lorna Mitchell has a quick post to her blog today showing how you can use a simple curl call from PHP to shorten urls with bit.ly and pull back the result.

I’ve been looking around for a really simple API that would be a nice place to get started using web services from PHP – and I realised that bit.ly actually fits the bill really well. They have straightforward api docs on google code, and it’s also a pretty simple function!

Her code is about three lines consisting of a curl_init call to the bit.ly server with the URL, a curl_setopt to tell it to return the information and a curl_exec to execute. The result is a JSON string easily decoded with a “url” parameter containing the newly minted short URL. She also briefly mentions some of the other features of the bit.ly API including reverse translation and bundling of links.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16648

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Zend: Registration Opens for Zend PHP Conference – Interest in Cloud Boosts Submissions by 400%

Zend: Registration Opens for Zend PHP Conference – Interest in Cloud Boosts Submissions by 400%

According to this press release from Zend, the registration for this year’s Zend PHP Conference has officially opened and speaker submissions were up four-hundred percent from previous years.

Zend anticipates its biggest ever conference due to growing interest in the practical use of PHP to develop cloud applications, which is reflected in the 400 percent increase in cloud-related submissions to this year’s Call for Papers. Strong interest in enterprise mobility, web automation and PHP advances are also reflected in this year’s content. ZendCon 2011 will offer keynotes by industry and enterprise IT leaders, in-depth technical sessions and tutorials, technology previews, vendor exhibits and networking opportunities. The event targets professional developers, IT/development managers, system administrators and business managers interested in PHP technologies and solutions for web, mobile and cloud.

The point out a few highlights of this year’s even including topics like cloud infrastructure, RIAs, mobile devices, application architecture and best practices. There’ll also be a preview of what’s coming in Zend Framework 2.0 as related to its cloud integration functionality. You can learn more about the conference and get your tickets at ZendCon.com.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16647

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Voices of the ElePHPant: Interview with Sean Coates

Voices of the ElePHPant: Interview with Sean Coates

The Voices of the ElePHPant podcast has posted it’s latest episode – an interview with Sean Coates (of Gimmie Bar).

Cal asks Sean his three questions about various projects and topics he’s involved with:

  • Can you talk to us about what you see about the process of how PHP is developed and is this a positive or a negative?
  • Can you give us a quick synopsis of why Gimmie Bar moved from CouchDb to MongoDb and are you still confident that it was the right decision?
  • Can you talk a bit about your experience with Node.js?

You can listen to this episode either using the in-page player, by downloading the mp3

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16646

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