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Archive for Czerwiec, 2011

Test.ical.ly Blog: Is forking symfony 1.5 really a realistic option?

Test.ical.ly Blog: Is forking symfony 1.5 really a realistic option?

In this new post to his blog, Christian wonders if forking the 1.x branch of Symfony to create a 1.5 version is a real possibility.

The idea of forking came up. But is this really going to happen? And does it make any sense at all? What would be the benefit of forking symfony 1.4 and continuing development of the 1.x branch?

He suggests that it might be worth it because the branch is currently stable, it has a proven track record, there’s already several plugins available and there’s a comfort level among developers using it. He still asks the “why?” question, though:

Not switching to Symfony2 would essentially mean that you accept these flaws [in 1.x]. Now even if I don’t agree I can not see a reason to argue against this. Being pragmatic is not a bad thing as such.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16535

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PHPBuilder.com: Beyond the PHP Shopping Cart: Five PHP-based Ecommerce Solutions

PHPBuilder.com: Beyond the PHP Shopping Cart: Five PHP-based Ecommerce Solutions

On PHPBuilder.com today, Jason Gilmore has posted a look at five PHP-based ecommerce solutions with a wide range of feature sets and larger support and usage across the web.

Literally hundreds of open source and commercial PHP-based ecommerce solutions exist, yet only a select few will adequately meet the aforementioned requirements. If you’re currently exploring a PHP-based ecommerce project, consider starting your investigations by learning more about these five prominent solutions.

The five that made the list were:

For each he gives a brief overview of what it has to offer and includes links to the official demo for you to try it out before making your decision.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16534

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PHP.net: PHP 5.4 alpha1 Released

PHP.net: PHP 5.4 alpha1 Released

On the PHP.net site today there’s an announcement about the release of the PHP 5.4 alpha1, the first version of the upcoming 5.4 release.

The PHP development team is proud to announce the first PHP 5.4 alpha release. PHP 5.4 includes new language features and removes several legacy (deprecated) behaviors. Read the NEWS file for a complete list of changes. [...] This alpha release exists to encourage users to identify bugs, and to ensure that all new features and backward compatibility breaks are evaluated and documented before PHP 5.4.0 is released. Please report findings to the QA mailing list and/or the PHP bug tracker. Windows binaries can be downloaded from the Windows QA site.

They remind the development community that this is an alpha release and is not meant to be used in production. Changes in this release include traits, array dereferencing, DTrace support, the removal of several ini options and a few session-related functions.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16533

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Bastien Labelle’s Blog: Why PHP is So Much Better than Ruby

Bastien Labelle’s Blog: Why PHP is So Much Better than Ruby

Bastien Labelle has posted a new (tongue-in-cheek) post to his blog today about a presentation he and a friend of his recently gave at a conference – Why PHP is so Much Better than Ruby.

Of course, saying that PHP is so much better than Ruby is pure bullshit, and this talk is, as I hope you guessed, a big big sarcasm. Trolling apart, I think this talk is also quite interesting, since somehow it shows some of the weaknesses of Ruby and its ecosystem.

Included in the post are their slides and a brief transcript of the main points they mentioned. Also interesting are some of the comments mentioning the typing issues the talk discussed and the fact that popularity isn’t the same as quality.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16532

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Community News: Latest Releases from PHPClasses.org

Community News: Latest Releases from PHPClasses.org

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16531

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Josh Adell’s Blog: Path finding with Neo4j

Josh Adell’s Blog: Path finding with Neo4j

In a follow up to his previous post on using Neo4j with PHP, Josh Adell looks in a bit more detail about how to find paths in the data via a REST interface to the database.

The thing that makes graphing databases useful is the ability to find relationship paths from one node to another. There are many algorithms for finding paths efficiently, depending on the use case.

He includes some code showing the REST request (made via this client) to fetch these street-based relationships. He then creates a little sample script that provides driving directions from one intersection to another with a “findPathsTo” call. He modifies it a bit later on to use the Dijkstra algorithm.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16530

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Anthony Ferrara’s Blog: In Response To: Building Secured Web Applications Using PHP – The Basics

Anthony Ferrara’s Blog: In Response To: Building Secured Web Applications Using PHP – The Basics

In a response to this post that introduced some basic security methods for your applications, Anthony Ferrara has posted some corrections and updates to the suggested methods, even pointing out where some of them are completely wrong.

Today an article popped into my feed reader that raise my eyebrows. The article’s title is “Building Secured Web Applications Using PHP – The Basics“. The summary of the item looked interesting, so I decided to open it up…What I found blew me away. It was filled with loads of bad information including some down-right wrong suggestions. Let me go through point by point and shed some light on the subject…

His response goes back through the original article by section header and explains either why the advice was bad and/or the more correct way to do things.

Security is not something you can learn in a page. It’s not something that you can learn in a single book. It takes a lot of time and effort. It should not be trivialized into a simple “Do this and you’ll be secure” style post. It sends the wrong message…

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16529

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Jump In Camp – Who is here and what are they doing?

Jump In Camp – Who is here and what are they doing?Reporting live from the basement of a hotel in Seattle, Washington, here is my report for today on Microsoft’s SQL Server jump In! Camp.


Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ZendDeveloperZone/~3/IQ9IwD520TA/15598-Jump-In-Camp—Who-is-here-and-what-are-they-doing

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Techie Talks Blog: Building Secured Web Applications Using PHP – The Basics

Techie Talks Blog: Building Secured Web Applications Using PHP – The Basics

On the Techie Talks blog today there’s a post from Idrish Laxmidhar with a few simple reminders of things you can do to help with the basic security of your PHP applications, mostly surrounding filtering and escaping.

The list includes some of the basics like:

  • Avoiding $_REQUEST when possible because of the ambiguity of where the information could come from
  • Keep register_globals off (thankfully a default!)
  • Checking values for specific data types before using them
  • Filtering user input
  • Disabling the error output (turning down the reporting levels) on a production environment

For some more good recommendations on good security practices in PHP applications, check out this list or some of the recommendations from the PHP manual itself.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16517

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Kevin Schroeder’s Blog: Deployment beta for Zend Server 5.5 – Getting Started

Kevin Schroeder’s Blog: Deployment beta for Zend Server 5.5 – Getting Started

In a new post today Kevin Schroeder points out a new feature in the Zend Server project (version 5.5, beta) that helps make deployment simple for your site. He also includes a “getting started” guide to show it in action.

We have announced that we are making the beta for our new deployment feature in Zend Server 5.5 beta, available for download. It’s not feature complete (there are some new features being worked on), but it provides the functionality needed for the 90% of us who do not have the need to have crazy complex deployment scenarios.

A short video is also included in the post to show how it’s all set up in the Zend Server interface. His guide, using the “zdpack” tool, shows how to package up a basic Zend Framework project, create the deployment skeleton (including handy hooks like “stage/unstage”, “activate/deactivate” where you can put Zend Framework-based PHP code), modify the deployment file to your needs and “zdpack” the result into a single packaged zip file. There’s a forum for support and some sample applications if you’d like to try it out with less hassle.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/16516

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