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Archive for Luty, 2011

Cal Evans’ Blog: Six ways to be a better client for your developer – Point 8

Cal Evans’ Blog: Six ways to be a better client for your developer – Point 8

Cal Evans has posted the eighth tip in his six-tip series (but who’s counting) about how a client can coordinate better with a developer and make a better relationship for the project. In this new tip, he suggests that the client “own it”.

No, I’m not talking about own it as in Point 7 – “Do your part”, I mean make sure that at the end of the project, you own the project, not your developer.

He mentions two of the aspects you, the client, will need to worry about once the last line of bug free code has been committed and delivered. Be sure that you own the domain name for the project and have a clear understanding of any intellectual property concerns that might come up (what codebase is it built on, who owns the code – client or developer, etc).

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15957

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Titanium Mobile Android Development: Installation

Titanium Mobile Android Development: Installation

In this series of tutorials we use Appcelerator’s Titanium Mobile platform to create Android applications. This tutorial goes over the installation and configuration of the Android SDK and Titanium Mobile on a Windows 7.

Java

Although our Titanium application will be created using Javascript, the Android SDK (which Titanium sits on top of) runs on Java. It’s likely you already have the JRE (Java Runtime Enviroment) installed on your computer, this allows Java applications to run. However to develop applications using Java (and hence Titanium) you will need the JDK (Java Development Kit). Head over to the Oracle website, download and install it. If you have already created Java applications before, this will probably already be installed on your system.

Android SDK

The next step is to get the Android SDK. Download, install and start the application (SDK Manager). Once it’s up and running you will be prompted to install different versions of the Android SDK, documentation and samples. You must install Android SDK Platform-tools. The choice of SDK versions is up to you. If you only intend to develop for Android 2.2, then only choose the 2.2 package. If you want your application to run on all versions of Android, then select all 1.X and 2.X packages. The 3.0 API isn’t stablised yet so Titanium does not support it. Also install Google’s Third Party Addons such as Google Maps and USB Device Support.

Configuring Paths

The last thing we need to do before installing Titanium is to set two environment variables and edit the Path environment variable. This must be done because Titanium checks these environment variables to find the correct path to the JDK and Android SDK. There are a couple of ways to set environment variables, the quickest and easiest way to do this is to type system variables into the search bar of the Windows Menu.

Clicking the Enviroment Variables button brings up this screen..

We need to add 2 environment variables:

android_sdk – The path to the Android SDK, similar (if not the same) to C:\Program Files\Android\android-sdk-windows

JAVA_HOME – The path to the JDK, similar (if not the same) to C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.6.0_24

We also need to add Java and the Android SDK to the Path environment variable. Select the Path environment variable and click edit. It will bring up a dialog box which contains of a long string of file system paths. Scroll to the far right and append ;C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.6.0_24\bin;C:\Program Files\Android\android-sdk-windows\platform-tools (or the appropriate paths to those directories). The semi colon is used as a delimiter, you must include them.

Titanium

Finally we can install Titanium. Head on over to the Appcelerator website and download Titanium Developer. Once installed Titanium Developer should automatically download the Titanium Mobile SDK. If it doesn’t then a notification will appear in the top right hand corner of Titanium Developer and you can install it by clicking on the notification.

Test Application

Now that the Android SDK and Titanium is installed and configured we can finally start making applications. Click the New Project button at the top of Titanium Developer. Select Mobile application and fill out the appropriate fields.

After the project is created click the Test & Package tab and then click the Launch button. Titanium will compile your application and launch it in the Emulator.

Next week we will build a native Android application using Titanium Mobile. It will download and parse an RSS feed and display the items in a TableView. When the item is clicked the default Android web browser will open and navigate to that web page. To be notified when that tutorial is published subscribe to our twitter or rss feeds.

Source: http://query7.com/titanium-mobile-android-development-installation

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This Week In Web – PHP Internals, jQuery Plugins, Kohana Performance

This Week In Web – PHP Internals, jQuery Plugins, Kohana Performance

Podcast: Under PHP’s Hood

The folks over at iBuildings recently put up an mp3 version of Johannes Schlüter’s talk “Under PHP’s Hood”. It was recorded at the Dutch PHP Conference 2010. Schlüter describes how common PHP operations are actually executed in the Zend Engine and the performance impact each has. He covers:

  • How your PHP script is run: compilation, opcodes, zend engine
  • How objects and arrays are stored: hashtables, refcount
  • include vs include_once vs require vs require_once
  • Autoloading
  • References (and why you shouldn’t use them in PHP5)
  • Garbage collection in PHP 5.3+

Reuse your Javascript as jQuery Plugins

Christopher Haupt recently wrote a tutorial for the EngineYard blog titled Reuse your Javascript as jQuery Plugins. Haupt walks you through the process of converting an existing piece of Javascript code into a jQuery plugin. He explains how to structure your plugin so it works with jQuery’s method chaining as well as how to create a standalone plugin that would be called like:

$.pluginName('some', 'param');

Optimizing a Kohana Based Website

A question about increasing the speed and scalability of a Kohana powered website was recently asked on Stackoverflow. User Pascal Martin replied with an incredibly detailed response on the different techniques available to speed up PHP powered websites. In his answer he goes into detail about using a reverse proxy, an opcode cache and implementing data caching in the application. He then explains how to profile your application using xdebug and how to view and interpret the results from that. If you run a PHP powered website (doesn’t necessarily have to run Kohana) then I highly recommend you read this answer.

Initializr

Initializr is a simple tool to help you getting started with an HTML5 project. It is built on HTML5 Boilerplate, a powerful HTML5 template created by Paul Irish and Divya Manian. Initializr will generate for you a clean customizable template based on Boilerplate with just what you need to start.

LimeJS

LimeJS is a new open source HTML5 game framework that targets iOS, Android and desktop web browsers. All audio, video and graphics display is done using HTML5 and Javascript, no Flash objects are loaded on the page. LimeJS utilises the Google Closure Library and provides an API similar to that of the Cocos2D library. There is a 7 part tutorial which introduces the different components that make up LimeJS (events, animations, sprites etc). Get LimeJS on Github. Below is a screenshot of a playable game created with LimeJS.

Source: http://query7.com/this-week-in-web-php-jquery-kohana

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SpeckBoy.com: Getting Started with CRUD In PHP

SpeckBoy.com: Getting Started with CRUD In PHP

On SpeckBoy.com there’s a new tutorial posted that introduces you to the concept of CRUD – Create, Read, Update, Delete – in the database interface for your application. Technically CRUD can be applied to any sort of data store, but they chose to go with a MySQL-based example.

It has become a common necessity for website owners to collect data and manage it properly. Creating a MySQL CRUD class allows you to conveniently create, read, update and delete entries for any of your projects, indifferent of how the database is devised. CRUD allows us to generate pages to list and edit database records.
So, in this tutorial I will show you how to build a simple CRUD web app, that will empower you with the basic functions of database management.

They briefly walk you through the setup of a XAMPP server to use as a base and give you the settings needed to create a simple users table. The rest of the post is the code you’ll need to make the connection from your PHP script, insert data into the table, update them, remove the rows and display their contents. They’ve wrapped it all up in a single “index.php” file to make it simpler.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15929

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Zend Developer Zone: Podcast: Interview with Mike Pavlak

Zend Developer Zone: Podcast: Interview with Mike Pavlak

On the Zend Developer Zone there’s a recent post of an interview with Mike Pavlak, a Solutions Consultant and IBM Series i expert, as interviewed in a podcast by Kevin Schroeder of Zend.

In this podcast Mike talks a little bit about where he’s come from, the history of PHP on the i and, what I think is most interesting, what it is that PHP developers can learn from the “old-school” RPG developers and vice versa.

Mike also talks about one of his favorite parts of his job – being able to go out and give talks and just being out in the communities (user groups, conferences, etc). You can listen to this interview via the in-page player for the post.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15928

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Symfony Blog: Symfony Live Unconference

Symfony Blog: Symfony Live Unconference

On the Symfony blog today Stefan Koopmanschap has announced the Symfony Live Unconference that will be happening at the same time as the second day of the Symfony Live Paris event.

It is with great pleasure that I present to you the Symfony Live Unconference. The Unconference will take place parallel to the second day of Symfony Live 2011 in Paris, and is sponsored by Interlutions and my own company Ingewikkeld.

The event opens the floor to anyone wanting to come and present on their topic – something Symfony or PHP development related, obviously. You can find out more about this new addition to the Symfony Live Paris event on its page and start getting those slides ready!

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15927

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Web Builder Zone: Can you use PHP without frameworks nowadays?

Web Builder Zone: Can you use PHP without frameworks nowadays?

On the Web Builder Zone today Giorgio Sironi has posed a question for all PHP developers out there – is it possible to (effectively) use PHP without a framework these days?

In the same days [of the PHP Barcelona Conference], I attended Matteo Vaccari’s talk at Webtech 2010. It was in Italian, but the translation would sound like Framework-free web programming. The context was the Java platform, where frameworks are even more invasive than in PHP. In that talk, I learned some interesting points which are often overlooked while considering frameworks adoption, delighted by the hope of writing less code.

Three of the points mentioned were the learning curve (and eventual lock-in) of using a framework, upgrading/version management and the errors/bugs/missing features that come with using another group’s code. Giorgio talks about using external libraries from frameworks (like the Zend Framework) by including them and that frameworks are generally “catch all” tools that you only may want these certain parts of to be effective.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15926

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StackOverflow.com: Optimizing Kohana-based Websites for Speed and Scalability

StackOverflow.com: Optimizing Kohana-based Websites for Speed and Scalability

On StackOverflow a question was asked about how to tweak and tune the performance of a Kohana-powered website. The result was a detailed answer from Pascal Martin that can be applied to just about any kind of web application out there, not just ones written in PHP.

Here are some points that come to my mind when talking about performances, scalability, PHP, …First of all, there are many aspects/questions that are to consider : configuration of the server (both PHP, MySQL, and system) ; you might get more help about that on serverfault, I suppose, PHP code, database queries, using or not your webserver? Can you use any kind of caching mechanism ? Or do you need always more that up to date data on the website ?

He goes on to give tips about using a reverse proxy (like Varnish), using an opcode cache, caching data as well, profiling and optimizing SQL queries. He finishes it off with a more specific look at Kohana and how you can use some of its built in tools to accomplish these same goals.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15925

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Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 02.18.2011

Site News: Popular Posts for the Week of 02.18.2011Popular posts from PHPDeveloper.org for the past week:

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15924

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Sven Eisenschmidt’s Blog: Symfony2 Tips

Sven Eisenschmidt’s Blog: Symfony2 Tips

Sven Eisenschmidt has put together a site that want to help beginners with the Symfony2 framework get up to speed quickly with some handy tips and tricks they can use in their development.

Some of the tips listed so far include:

Check out the full blog for more tips and links to presentations.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15923

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