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Archive for Listopad, 2010

Label Media Blog: Design Patterns in PHP – Factory method

Label Media Blog: Design Patterns in PHP – Factory method

On the Label Media blog today there’s a new post from Tom Rawcliffe (the first part of a series) about a common design pattern you can use in your applications – the factory pattern.

A design pattern is a template used by software engineers as a guideline of how to solve a particular problem. [...] In this series of articles I plan to explore some of the design patterns that i have found most useful in my time as a PHP developer, providing examples and notes. So, this being the first, we’ll take a look at the Factory Method Pattern.

He defines the pattern – an interface to a class without the caller having to know what type of class it is – and a code example showing an abstract class with a “Factory” method that pulls information from either a jpeg or png class based on the extension of the file name given.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15501

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Label Media Blog: Design Patterns in PHP – Factory method

Label Media Blog: Design Patterns in PHP – Factory method

On the Label Media blog today there’s a new post from Tom Rawcliffe (the first part of a series) about a common design pattern you can use in your applications – the factory pattern.

A design pattern is a template used by software engineers as a guideline of how to solve a particular problem. [...] In this series of articles I plan to explore some of the design patterns that i have found most useful in my time as a PHP developer, providing examples and notes. So, this being the first, we’ll take a look at the Factory Method Pattern.

He defines the pattern – an interface to a class without the caller having to know what type of class it is – and a code example showing an abstract class with a “Factory” method that pulls information from either a jpeg or png class based on the extension of the file name given.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15501

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Label Media Blog: Design Patterns in PHP – Factory method

Label Media Blog: Design Patterns in PHP – Factory method

On the Label Media blog today there’s a new post from Tom Rawcliffe (the first part of a series) about a common design pattern you can use in your applications – the factory pattern.

A design pattern is a template used by software engineers as a guideline of how to solve a particular problem. [...] In this series of articles I plan to explore some of the design patterns that i have found most useful in my time as a PHP developer, providing examples and notes. So, this being the first, we’ll take a look at the Factory Method Pattern.

He defines the pattern – an interface to a class without the caller having to know what type of class it is – and a code example showing an abstract class with a “Factory” method that pulls information from either a jpeg or png class based on the extension of the file name given.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15501

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Chris Tankersley’s Blog: Playing with Lithium

Chris Tankersley’s Blog: Playing with Lithium

Chris Tankersley has posted his look at the Lithium framework as someone familiar with frameworks, just not one quite like this.

Since my day job was generous enough to give me the entire week off (as a reward, thankfully not a “Don’t bother coming into work next week, or ever” kind of thing), I decided that I would spend some time looking at a new framework. I haven’t looked hard a new framework since I really started working with Zend Framework a few years ago. I decided to take a look at Lithium, an up-and-coming 5.3 only PHP framework.

In the process of following through their blog tutorial, Chris came across a few other things to mention like the filtering system, the simplicity of getting the MVC app up and working and the 5.3-ness of it all. He also mentions a few downsides to using the framework:

  • the rapid evolution of the code is good, but the documentation is lacking and not as up to date
  • a lack of community documentation/examples
  • relational databases are treated as a second class citizen

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15500

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Chris Tankersley’s Blog: Playing with Lithium

Chris Tankersley’s Blog: Playing with Lithium

Chris Tankersley has posted his look at the Lithium framework as someone familiar with frameworks, just not one quite like this.

Since my day job was generous enough to give me the entire week off (as a reward, thankfully not a “Don’t bother coming into work next week, or ever” kind of thing), I decided that I would spend some time looking at a new framework. I haven’t looked hard a new framework since I really started working with Zend Framework a few years ago. I decided to take a look at Lithium, an up-and-coming 5.3 only PHP framework.

In the process of following through their blog tutorial, Chris came across a few other things to mention like the filtering system, the simplicity of getting the MVC app up and working and the 5.3-ness of it all. He also mentions a few downsides to using the framework:

  • the rapid evolution of the code is good, but the documentation is lacking and not as up to date
  • a lack of community documentation/examples
  • relational databases are treated as a second class citizen

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15500

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Chris Tankersley’s Blog: Playing with Lithium

Chris Tankersley’s Blog: Playing with Lithium

Chris Tankersley has posted his look at the Lithium framework as someone familiar with frameworks, just not one quite like this.

Since my day job was generous enough to give me the entire week off (as a reward, thankfully not a “Don’t bother coming into work next week, or ever” kind of thing), I decided that I would spend some time looking at a new framework. I haven’t looked hard a new framework since I really started working with Zend Framework a few years ago. I decided to take a look at Lithium, an up-and-coming 5.3 only PHP framework.

In the process of following through their blog tutorial, Chris came across a few other things to mention like the filtering system, the simplicity of getting the MVC app up and working and the 5.3-ness of it all. He also mentions a few downsides to using the framework:

  • the rapid evolution of the code is good, but the documentation is lacking and not as up to date
  • a lack of community documentation/examples
  • relational databases are treated as a second class citizen

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15500

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Maarten Balliauw’s Blog: Writing for the Windows Azure for PHP portal

Maarten Balliauw’s Blog: Writing for the Windows Azure for PHP portal

Maarten Balliauw has a new post to his blog with some resources you can use if you’re looking to get started using PHP and Azure for your application.

The good reason for not being that active on my blog lately is the fact that I’m producing content for Microsoft’s Interoperability team. Have you ever wanted to start working with Windows Azure and PHP? No idea where to start? Meet the official portal: Developing Applications for Azure with PHP.

He also links to a few specific resources that are cover Azure+Eclipse, the Azure SDK, using the Queue and using blob storage.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15499

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Maarten Balliauw’s Blog: Writing for the Windows Azure for PHP portal

Maarten Balliauw’s Blog: Writing for the Windows Azure for PHP portal

Maarten Balliauw has a new post to his blog with some resources you can use if you’re looking to get started using PHP and Azure for your application.

The good reason for not being that active on my blog lately is the fact that I’m producing content for Microsoft’s Interoperability team. Have you ever wanted to start working with Windows Azure and PHP? No idea where to start? Meet the official portal: Developing Applications for Azure with PHP.

He also links to a few specific resources that are cover Azure+Eclipse, the Azure SDK, using the Queue and using blob storage.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15499

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Maarten Balliauw’s Blog: Writing for the Windows Azure for PHP portal

Maarten Balliauw’s Blog: Writing for the Windows Azure for PHP portal

Maarten Balliauw has a new post to his blog with some resources you can use if you’re looking to get started using PHP and Azure for your application.

The good reason for not being that active on my blog lately is the fact that I’m producing content for Microsoft’s Interoperability team. Have you ever wanted to start working with Windows Azure and PHP? No idea where to start? Meet the official portal: Developing Applications for Azure with PHP.

He also links to a few specific resources that are cover Azure+Eclipse, the Azure SDK, using the Queue and using blob storage.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15499

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Sameer Borate’s Blog: How not to create a Random string

Sameer Borate’s Blog: How not to create a Random string

In this latest post to his blog, Samer Borate talks about how not to create random strings and how, if you’re not careful, it could backfire on you.

It is surprising to see how after all the code floating around people still find it hard to create random numbers. In a recent piece of code I encountered, the following was used to generate a string of random numbers. The code was written to provide a random string to be passed to a email verifier system – the type wherein a new user when he subscribes to a website needs to verify his email by clicking on a provided link.

He includes a snippet of the code that uses a call to str_shuffle on the set of numbers 1-10 to generate a random number. The only problem with the method is that, when the number gets large enough, PHP would automatically kick it into exponential format – not exactly ideal for an email link. Let this serve as a reminder for any scripts you might make that are similar.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/15498

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>