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Archive for the ‘WEB and PHP Development’ Category

SitePoint PHP Blog: How to Master Your API Workflow with Postman

SitePoint PHP Blog: How to Master Your API Workflow with Postman

On the SitePoint PHP blog author Younes Rafie has returned with another tutorial, this time with a focus on how Postman can help master your API workflow by making use of several of the features it already includes.

Building good APIs is hard, and anyone who had the chance to do so can relate to this. A project can easily grow to become a mess. One can keep trying to adopt an approach to make it more enjoyable, like trying a documentation-first workflow, but something always feels clumsy.

I was trying out Postman lately, a tool we’ve briefly covered before, and I discovered that they’re doing a great job by providing an integrated environment for different components of an API, like authorization, testing, documentation, versioning, etc.

He then goes through the use of the tool, including screenshots along the way for:

  • Making requests
  • Authorization
  • Environment Variables
  • Testing
  • Validating JSON schemas
  • Working with collections

The post finishes up with a look at generating documentation for the API using Postman’s "View in Web" feature including integrating example calls and publishing it. There’s also a look at exporting and importing data and a few links to some other helpful resources.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25492

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

SitePoint PHP Blog: How to Master Your API Workflow with Postman

SitePoint PHP Blog: How to Master Your API Workflow with Postman

On the SitePoint PHP blog author Younes Rafie has returned with another tutorial, this time with a focus on how Postman can help master your API workflow by making use of several of the features it already includes.

Building good APIs is hard, and anyone who had the chance to do so can relate to this. A project can easily grow to become a mess. One can keep trying to adopt an approach to make it more enjoyable, like trying a documentation-first workflow, but something always feels clumsy.

I was trying out Postman lately, a tool we’ve briefly covered before, and I discovered that they’re doing a great job by providing an integrated environment for different components of an API, like authorization, testing, documentation, versioning, etc.

He then goes through the use of the tool, including screenshots along the way for:

  • Making requests
  • Authorization
  • Environment Variables
  • Testing
  • Validating JSON schemas
  • Working with collections

The post finishes up with a look at generating documentation for the API using Postman’s "View in Web" feature including integrating example calls and publishing it. There’s also a look at exporting and importing data and a few links to some other helpful resources.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25492

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

North Meets South Podcast: Conventions, configuration, and becoming a lead developer

North Meets South Podcast: Conventions, configuration, and becoming a lead developer

The North Meets South podcast, hosted by Jacob Bennett and Michael Dyrynda, has posted their latest episode: Episode #32 – Conventions, configuration, and becoming a lead developer.

Topics mentioned in this show include:

You can listen to this latest episode either using the in-page audio player or by downloading the show for listening offline. If you enjoy the show, be sure to subscribe to their feed and follow them on Twitter to get the latest updates when new episodes are released.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25491

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

SitePoint PHP Blog: How to Master Your API Workflow with Postman

SitePoint PHP Blog: How to Master Your API Workflow with Postman

On the SitePoint PHP blog author Younes Rafie has returned with another tutorial, this time with a focus on how Postman can help master your API workflow by making use of several of the features it already includes.

Building good APIs is hard, and anyone who had the chance to do so can relate to this. A project can easily grow to become a mess. One can keep trying to adopt an approach to make it more enjoyable, like trying a documentation-first workflow, but something always feels clumsy.

I was trying out Postman lately, a tool we’ve briefly covered before, and I discovered that they’re doing a great job by providing an integrated environment for different components of an API, like authorization, testing, documentation, versioning, etc.

He then goes through the use of the tool, including screenshots along the way for:

  • Making requests
  • Authorization
  • Environment Variables
  • Testing
  • Validating JSON schemas
  • Working with collections

The post finishes up with a look at generating documentation for the API using Postman’s "View in Web" feature including integrating example calls and publishing it. There’s also a look at exporting and importing data and a few links to some other helpful resources.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25492

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

North Meets South Podcast: Conventions, configuration, and becoming a lead developer

North Meets South Podcast: Conventions, configuration, and becoming a lead developer

The North Meets South podcast, hosted by Jacob Bennett and Michael Dyrynda, has posted their latest episode: Episode #32 – Conventions, configuration, and becoming a lead developer.

Topics mentioned in this show include:

You can listen to this latest episode either using the in-page audio player or by downloading the show for listening offline. If you enjoy the show, be sure to subscribe to their feed and follow them on Twitter to get the latest updates when new episodes are released.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25491

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Tideways.io: Using php-fpm as a simple built-in async queue

Tideways.io: Using php-fpm as a simple built-in async queue

On the Tideways blog Benjamin Eberlei has written up a post showing how to use php-fpm as a "poor man’s queue" system, making it easier to hand off requests to be worked on out of band without having to install other software.

There are many tasks that a web-request should not perform directly so the user doesn’t have to wait many seconds for a response. [...] The usual advice you find on the internet is to setup a queue such as RabbitMQ, Redis, Kafka, Gearman or Beanstalkd. But this means another service that you need to install, setup, maintain and monitor. With some of the queue systems operating them includes a steep learning phase that requires time and money for additional hardware.

But maybe you just need a poor mans version of an asynchronous queue without all the overhead? Then why not just use PHP-FPM itself?

He admits that it’s more of an "experimental approach" but feels like it could be a viable option for the php-fpm users out there. He then shows how to use the hollodotme/fast-cgi-client library to execute an asynchronous request for a "SendEmail" command. The request is then passed off to another PHP-FPM worker for processing without the user having to wait on a result. He ends the post with a few words of warning about using this approach and some other methods for getting around the offloading of longer processing.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25490

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Tideways.io: Using php-fpm as a simple built-in async queue

Tideways.io: Using php-fpm as a simple built-in async queue

On the Tideways blog Benjamin Eberlei has written up a post showing how to use php-fpm as a "poor man’s queue" system, making it easier to hand off requests to be worked on out of band without having to install other software.

There are many tasks that a web-request should not perform directly so the user doesn’t have to wait many seconds for a response. [...] The usual advice you find on the internet is to setup a queue such as RabbitMQ, Redis, Kafka, Gearman or Beanstalkd. But this means another service that you need to install, setup, maintain and monitor. With some of the queue systems operating them includes a steep learning phase that requires time and money for additional hardware.

But maybe you just need a poor mans version of an asynchronous queue without all the overhead? Then why not just use PHP-FPM itself?

He admits that it’s more of an "experimental approach" but feels like it could be a viable option for the php-fpm users out there. He then shows how to use the hollodotme/fast-cgi-client library to execute an asynchronous request for a "SendEmail" command. The request is then passed off to another PHP-FPM worker for processing without the user having to wait on a result. He ends the post with a few words of warning about using this approach and some other methods for getting around the offloading of longer processing.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25490

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Laravel News Podcast: Episode 43 – Laracon US 2017 wrap, Laravel Horizon, and new versions galore

Laravel News Podcast: Episode 43 – Laracon US 2017 wrap, Laravel Horizon, and new versions galore

The latest episode of the Laravel News podcast, hosted by Jacob Bennett and Michael Dyrynda, has posted their latest episode: Episode 43.

Jake and Michael return after a few weeks’ hiatus to recap Laracon US 2017, the big reveal of Laravel Horizon, and catch up on the latest framework news.

You can read the full episode transcript which includes time markers and links.

The post also includes links to several of the topics and software mentioned in the episode. If you enjoy the show be sure to subscribe to their feed to get notifications when the latest episodes are released.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25489

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Laravel News Podcast: Episode 43 – Laracon US 2017 wrap, Laravel Horizon, and new versions galore

Laravel News Podcast: Episode 43 – Laracon US 2017 wrap, Laravel Horizon, and new versions galore

The latest episode of the Laravel News podcast, hosted by Jacob Bennett and Michael Dyrynda, has posted their latest episode: Episode 43.

Jake and Michael return after a few weeks’ hiatus to recap Laracon US 2017, the big reveal of Laravel Horizon, and catch up on the latest framework news.

You can read the full episode transcript which includes time markers and links.

The post also includes links to several of the topics and software mentioned in the episode. If you enjoy the show be sure to subscribe to their feed to get notifications when the latest episodes are released.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25489

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>

Laravel News Podcast: Episode 43 – Laracon US 2017 wrap, Laravel Horizon, and new versions galore

Laravel News Podcast: Episode 43 – Laracon US 2017 wrap, Laravel Horizon, and new versions galore

The latest episode of the Laravel News podcast, hosted by Jacob Bennett and Michael Dyrynda, has posted their latest episode: Episode 43.

Jake and Michael return after a few weeks’ hiatus to recap Laracon US 2017, the big reveal of Laravel Horizon, and catch up on the latest framework news.

You can read the full episode transcript which includes time markers and links.

The post also includes links to several of the topics and software mentioned in the episode. If you enjoy the show be sure to subscribe to their feed to get notifications when the latest episodes are released.

Source: http://www.phpdeveloper.org/news/25489

<!–
var d = new Date();
r = escape(d.getTime()*Math.random());
document.writeln('’);
//–>